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Article

David Coghlan

Points out that a significant element of an individual′s life is throughgroups and that there are many different aspects of groups inorganizational life. Holds that the…

Abstract

Points out that a significant element of an individual′s life is through groups and that there are many different aspects of groups in organizational life. Holds that the informal influence a group exerts on individual members through socialization, enforcement of norms and development of culture is powerful in how individuals respond to organizational change. Argues that teambuilding is critical to forming group responses to change issues, whether through the formal teams or through temporary task forces and committees.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Jennifer Jane Britton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the expansion of the coaching context in organizations through team and group coaching. The paper provides definitions and several…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the expansion of the coaching context in organizations through team and group coaching. The paper provides definitions and several examples of what these engagements look like, along with key considerations when expanding the coaching conversation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on research undertaken during the writing of two books on group and team coaching, including more than two dozen interviews with team and group coaches.

Findings

Group and Team Coaching are two modalities for expanding the coaching conversation in organizations. They provide opportunities to scale coaching, build organizational capacity and reduce the silos.

Practical implications

The paper provides examples of what team and group coaching can look like in action, informing coaches, leaders and other practitioners as they approach expanding the coaching conversation.

Originality/value

Group and team coaching are emerging sub-disciplines of the coaching profession. This paper will stimulate dialogue regarding how these modalities can be leveraged within organizations, and differences with related fields.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part

Laura Fink

This article examines the effect of the customer focus (CF) group of competencies, which includes communication and negotiation skills, on project performance as measured…

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines the effect of the customer focus (CF) group of competencies, which includes communication and negotiation skills, on project performance as measured by reaching the internal and the overall budget, the quality, and the deadline goals.

Methodology/approach

The multiple regression model was based on a dataset from Trimo, an engineering and production company of prefabricated buildings.

Findings

The inverted U-shaped relationship of the CF group has been proven to exist with all project goals.

Research implications

The present study provides a starting-point for further empirical research on the international construction sector, projects, teams, and competence research.

Details

A Focused Issue on Building New Competences in Dynamic Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-274-6

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part

Jennifer M. George and Eden B. King

We propose that group affective tone may be dysfunctional for teams faced with complex, equivocal, and dynamically changing tasks and environments. Group affective tone …

Abstract

We propose that group affective tone may be dysfunctional for teams faced with complex, equivocal, and dynamically changing tasks and environments. Group affective tone (and in particular, a positive affective tone) may exacerbate pre-existing tendencies of teams to develop a single-shared reality that team members confidently believe to be valid and to be prone to group-centrism. Alternatively, heterogeneity in member mood states within teams may lead to the development of multiple-shared realities that reflect the equivocality of the teams’ tasks and circumstances and other functional outcomes (e.g., multiple perspectives and minority dissent), which ultimately may enhance team effectiveness.

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Affect and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1413-3

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Book part

Claudia A. Sacramento, M.-W. Sophie Chang and Michael A. West

As other researchers have done previously, we conceptualize innovation not as a linear process but as a cyclical one (e.g., Van de Ven, Polley, Garud, & Venkataraman, 1999

Abstract

As other researchers have done previously, we conceptualize innovation not as a linear process but as a cyclical one (e.g., Van de Ven, Polley, Garud, & Venkataraman, 1999), which consist periods of innovation initiation, implementation, adaptation, and stabilization (West, 1990). Within this cycle it is possible to distinguish two major components: the beginning of the cycle, which is dominated by the generation of ideas that is generally also designated as creativity; whereas the dominant activity at the end of the cycle which is the implementation of ideas (hereafter referred to as the implementation of innovation). Creativity is then likely to be most evident in the early stages of the innovation process, when those in teams are required to develop or offer ideas in response to a perceived need for innovation. Creative thinking is also likely when teams proactively initiate proposals for change and consider their initial implementation. As the innovation is adapted to organizational circumstances, there is less need for creativity. At the outset of the process, creativity dominates, to be superseded later by innovation implementation processes. Of course, it can be argued that creativity is important throughout the innovation process, but in general, the requirements for creative ideas will be greater at the earlier stages of the innovation process than the later stages.

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Innovation through Collaboration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-331-0

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Book part

Florian Jentsch, Raegan M Hoeft, Stephen M Fiore and Clint A Bowers

Most traditional research on work groups has studied groups and teams that are homogeneous with respect to culture. To alleviate the dearth of material on culturally…

Abstract

Most traditional research on work groups has studied groups and teams that are homogeneous with respect to culture. To alleviate the dearth of material on culturally heterogeneous teams, this chapter provides an overview of the impact of cultural diversity on groups and teams in today’s workforce. First, we focus on the problems involved in defining the constructs of “teamsand “culture.” Second, we provide a brief review of the cultural factors that have been identified as affecting human performance. This review serves as the basis for the third section of this chapter, which investigates if – and how – cultural heterogeneity affects team performance. Finally, we conclude with how culturally diverse workplaces can be managed and how to improve performance when faced with cultural diversity.

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Cultural Ergonomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-049-4

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Roni Reiter-Palmon, Anne E. Herman and Francis J. Yammarino

This chapter provides an in-depth understanding of the cognitive processes that facilitate creativity from a multi-level perspective. Because cognitive processes are…

Abstract

This chapter provides an in-depth understanding of the cognitive processes that facilitate creativity from a multi-level perspective. Because cognitive processes are viewed as residing within the individual and as an individual-level phenomenon, it is not surprising that a plethora of research has focused on various cognitive processes involved in creative production at the individual level and the factors that may facilitate or hinder the successful application of these processes. Of course, individuals do not exist in a vacuum, and many organizations are utilizing teams and groups to facilitate creative problem solving. We therefore extend our knowledge from the individual to the team level and group level, providing more than 50 propositions for testing and discussing their implications for future research.

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Multi-Level Issues in Creativity and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-553-6

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Book part

Shelley D. Dionne and Peter J. Dionne

Previous literature has compared the effectiveness of different styles of leadership, yet most of this research has not compared different levels of analyses regarding…

Abstract

Previous literature has compared the effectiveness of different styles of leadership, yet most of this research has not compared different levels of analyses regarding leader styles or behaviors. This shortcoming often limits our understanding of how leadership acts on a phenomenon of interest to a single level of analysis. This article develops a computational model and describes a levels-based comparison of four types of leadership that represent three different levels: individual, dyad, and group. When examined across a dynamic group decision-making optimization scenario, group-based leadership is found to produce decisions that are closer to optimal than dyadic-based and individual-based leadership. An alternative computational model varying individual cognitive and experience-based components among group members also indicates that group-based leadership produces more optimal decisions. First published in Leadership Quarterly (Dionne, S. D., & Dionne, P. J. (2008). Levels-based leadership and hierarchical group decision optimization: A simulation. Leadership Quarterly, 19, 212–234), this version offers an updated introduction discussing simulation as a theoretical development tool and supplies additional evidence regarding the growth of simulation methods in leadership research.

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Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-503-7

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Book part

Miriam Matteson

This qualitative study investigated how small group communication influences the development of shared mental models in a committee of public librarians addressing a…

Abstract

This qualitative study investigated how small group communication influences the development of shared mental models in a committee of public librarians addressing a problem-solving task. It examines the influence of communication themes, functions, roles, and rules on the group's development of shared mental models about the task and about team interaction. Data were collected over the course of a year from group meetings, email messages, group documents, and participant interviews and then analyzed using existing coding schemes and qualitative coding techniques. The findings indicate that within the group there was a strong superficial convergence around the task mental model and the team interaction mental model but a weaker convergence at a deeper level. Analysis of the group communication data shows that the group focused discussion on understanding the problem and identifying tasks, enacting group roles and rules that facilitated sharing information. The functions of their messages focused on task communication. The findings suggest that, in this group, communication themes most heavily influenced the development of a shared mental model about the task, while communication roles, rules, and functions were more influential toward the development of a shared mental model about team interaction. Implications for practice include adopting intentional tactics for surfacing mental models at various points in the group life and anchoring the emerging model within the collective cognition of the group through devices such as narratives, objects, or documentary materials.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-287-7

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