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Abstract

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Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Book part

Eunju Ko and Heewon Sung

“Trading up” is the phenomenon that describes consumers’ willingness to pay premiums on goods that are emotionally meaningful to them. The meaning of a good is reliant on…

Abstract

“Trading up” is the phenomenon that describes consumers’ willingness to pay premiums on goods that are emotionally meaningful to them. The meaning of a good is reliant on an individual's consumption values. The purpose of this study was to examine the phenomenon of trading up among Korean university students. A total of 223 usable surveys were analyzed. Fifty-one product categories were reported for trading up, and divided into four classifications: clothes, fashion accessories, small electronics, and other appliances. These four classifications were significantly associated with brand types, retailing formats, and information sources. Finally, respondents were classified into three groups according to consumption values and each group exhibited different relationships with the marketing mix variables.

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Cross-Cultural Buyer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-485-0

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Article

Erik Masao Eriksson and Lars Nordgren

There is a current trend in healthcare management away from produced and standardized one-size-fits-all processes toward co-created and individualized services. The…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a current trend in healthcare management away from produced and standardized one-size-fits-all processes toward co-created and individualized services. The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of the value concept in healthcare organization and management by recognizing different levels of value (private, group and public) and the interconnectedness among these levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses social constructionism as a lens to problematize the individualization of service logic’s value concept. Theories from consumer culture theory/transformative service research and public management add group and public levels of value to the private level.

Findings

An intersubjective (rather than subjective) approach to value creation entails the construction and sharing of value perceptions among groups of people. Such an approach also implies that group members may face similar barriers in their value creation efforts.

Practical implications

Healthcare management should be aware of the inherent individualism of service logic and, consequently, the need to balance private value with group and public levels of value.

Social implications

Identifying and addressing disadvantaged groups and the reasons for their disadvantaged positions is important in order to enhance the individual’s value creation prerequisites as well as to address public and societal values, such as equal/equitable health(care).

Originality/value

It is important to complement service logic’s value creation with group and public levels in order to understand the complexity and interconnectedness of value and the creation thereof.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Yoser Gadhoum, Jean‐Pierre Gueyié and Maher Zoubeidi

This paper aims to assess the impact of group affiliation and anticipated expropriation on North American firms' value.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the impact of group affiliation and anticipated expropriation on North American firms' value.

Design/methodology/approach

The net impact of firms' affiliation to groups is generally far from evident. While group affiliation can be perceived as positive news because of the benefits of internal capital markets, the fear of expropriation of minority interests by large shareholders can mitigate such benefits. This commands some empirical investigations, which are done in this paper through statistical analyses.

Findings

The results indicate that group affiliation has a positive and significant impact on North American firms' value and, more specifically, on US firms' value. The negative impact of the anticipated expropriation of minority shareholders mainly comes from divergence in ownership and voting rights between the first and second ultimate owners. Group affiliation, then, is valuable, even in countries with well‐organized capital markets. The results may explain the current wave toward mergers and acquisitions.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on the impact of group affiliation and anticipated expropriation on North American firms' value.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article

Karen A. Jehn

This study investigates the benefits and detriments of emotional and task‐related conflict in work groups. Group value consensus (GVC), or the extent to which group

Abstract

This study investigates the benefits and detriments of emotional and task‐related conflict in work groups. Group value consensus (GVC), or the extent to which group members share values, and group value fit (GVF), or the degree to which the culture of the group matches the ideal culture envisioned by external parties with control over the group, are hypothesized to decrease conflict. In examining 88 workgroups performing comparable organizational tasks, it was found that groups with low levels of value similarity among members and between the group and governing superiors had higher levels of conflict than groups with high levels of value similarity. As hypothesized, emotional conflict was negatively associated with group performance and satisfaction, while task conflict was positively associated with group performance. The implications of these results for conflict management and group effectiveness are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

J.C. Peng and Julian Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between ethical leadership and group-level performance outcomes and show that group value congruence and group

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between ethical leadership and group-level performance outcomes and show that group value congruence and group trust play pivotal mediating roles in the relationship between ethical leadership and work group performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine the proposed model, survey data from 116 branches of a baked goods and beverages chain located in Northern Taiwan were analyzed.

Findings

The results revealed that ethical leadership was positively and significantly related to group in-role performance and group helping behavior; the relationship was fully mediated by group value congruence and group trust after controlling for idealized influence leadership.

Research limitations/implications

This study features a cross-sectional study design, thus limiting the accuracy of inferences about causality.

Practical implications

The results of the current study revealed that ethical leadership behaviors enhance group trust. Hence, these leadership behaviors could be among the best and most appropriate practices to be implemented in China and Taiwan.

Originality/value

The data suggested that ethical leadership was associated with not only individual-level behavior but also group-level performance. Furthermore, this paper also uncovered the mediation mechanism through which ethical leadership enhances group performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Alicia Izquierdo-Yusta, Carmen M. Gómez-Cantó, Jorge Pelegrin-Borondo and María Pilar Martínez-Ruiz

The purpose of this paper is to understand consumers’ behaviour in fast-food restaurants in Spain. To this end, the authors conducted a survey that combined a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand consumers’ behaviour in fast-food restaurants in Spain. To this end, the authors conducted a survey that combined a classification of food values, as proposed in the relevant literature, with a related model that links personal values to behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 400 consumers was gathered from two different, leading fast-food chains operating in Spain. With these data, respondents were grouped through hierarchical cluster analysis and K-measures, and in accordance with Lusk and Briggeman’s (2009) food values and the food-related lifestyle model. The authors validated these clusters by means of ANOVA and discriminant analysis, which led to useful observations about inter-group differences in consumers’ habits, as well as their satisfaction, trust and loyalty.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers can be clustered into three groups based their food values assessments: the “mainly utilitarian” group, the “mainly hedonic” group and the “ethical valuesgroup. These groups not only demonstrate diverse habits, but also differ on key variables such as satisfaction, trust and loyalty.

Practical implications

The authors offer several managerial recommendations for designing and developing segmentation strategies in the fast-food industry. Any such strategies should acknowledge that all consumer groups appear to value restaurants’ efforts to provide them with both hedonic and utilitarian benefits, although the extent varies across groups.

Originality/value

Among the relevant literature, this research is the only one that examines the existence of distinct consumer groups based on their food values assessments. In addition, this paper analyses inter-group differences in terms of both diverse consumptions habits (frequency of visits, expenditure, etc.) and key marketing variables (satisfaction, trust and loyalty).

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Karen A. Jehn, Clint Chadwick and Sherry M.B. Thatcher

In this quasi‐experimental study we investigate value congruence and demographic dissimilarity among group members as factors which influence various types of conflict…

Abstract

In this quasi‐experimental study we investigate value congruence and demographic dissimilarity among group members as factors which influence various types of conflict within workgroups. We also examine whether it is beneficial for members to be different or alike, to agree or disagree, in order to foster work group productivity. Results indicate that visible individual demographic differences (i.e., sex, age) increase relationship conflict, while informational demographic differences (i.e., education) increase task‐focused conflict. Value congruence of members decreased both relationship and task conflict, and the specific content of the values held by members influenced performance. Specifically, both detail and outcome group value orientations increased objective performance; outcome, decisiveness, and stability orientations increased perceptions of high performance; and both decisiveness and supportiveness orientations increased the satisfaction level of group members while a team orientation decreased individual member satisfaction in this sample.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part

Tyler G. Okimoto, Michael Wenzel and Michael J. Platow

Purpose – To develop a new model of restorative reparation that attempts to capture the dynamic role of shared identity perceptions.Design/methodology/approach – Drawing…

Abstract

Purpose – To develop a new model of restorative reparation that attempts to capture the dynamic role of shared identity perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on recent advances in restorative justice theory (Wenzel, Okimoto, Feather, & Platow, 2008), we explore the theoretical proposition that a greater understanding of the identity relations between victims, offenders, and the groups in which they are embedded is key to understanding a victim's underlying motives toward justice, and thus, predicting when victims will react favorably to restorative justice processes and prefer them over traditional retributive justice interventions.

Findings – We argue that a perceived shared identity between the victim and the offender determines the extent to which the victim understands the transgression as requiring a revalidation of the rules, values, or morals undermined by the offense. Moreover, we propose that these identity relations are dynamic in that they both affect and are affected by the experience of injustice. Thus, identity is also shaped by the transgression itself through, inter alia, processes associated with positive social identity maintenance. Importantly, these shifts in identity determine how injustice victims are likely to respond to constructive approaches to conflict resolution such as restorative justice.

Originality/value – We offer a series of testable hypotheses aimed at engendering future research in the domain of constructive justice restoration in groups. Moreover, this work suggests that to develop effective resolution strategies, we must consider how an injustice event shapes the relations between the affected parties over time rather than simply assuming identity relations are static.

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Fairness and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-162-7

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Tyler G. Okimoto and Michael Wenzel

This chapter proposes and provides evidence for a conceptual framework for understanding the restoration of justice. Specifically, there is a fundamental distinction…

Abstract

This chapter proposes and provides evidence for a conceptual framework for understanding the restoration of justice. Specifically, there is a fundamental distinction between two primary symbolic concerns that follow from transgressions: concern over the status/power relations between the involved parties, and over the violation of the values those parties expect to share. Recognizing these concerns is paramount to understanding the psychological needs of injustice victims, how they conceptualize the restoration of justice, and the processes by which various interventions instill feelings of justice. This framework also elucidates when alternative avenues towards justice might be more effective than traditional retributive responses.

Details

Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-104-6

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