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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Mirela Vlastelica

In the course of group analytic psychotherapy, where we discovered the power of the therapeutic effects, there occurred the need of group analytic psychotherapy

Abstract

In the course of group analytic psychotherapy, where we discovered the power of the therapeutic effects, there occurred the need of group analytic psychotherapy researches. Psychotherapeutic work in general, and group psychotherapy in particular, are hard to measure and put into some objective frames. Researches, i. e. measuring of changes in psychotherapy is a complex task, and there are large disagreements. For a long time, the empirical-descriptive method was the only way of research in the field of group psychotherapy. Problems of researches in group psychotherapy in general, and particularly in group analytic psychotherapy can be reviewed as methodology problems at first, especially due to unrepeatability of the therapeutic process.

The basic polemics about measuring of changes in psychotherapy is based on the question whether a change is to be measured by means of open measuring of behaviour or whether it should be evaluated more finely by monitoring inner psychological dimensions. Following the therapy results up, besides providing additional information on the patient's improvement, strengthens the psychotherapist's self-respect, as well as his respectability and credibility as a scientist.

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Mental Illness, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Marilena Maglia, Roberta Auditore, Stefano Pipitone, Rachele DiPasqua, Lucio Inguscio and Pasquale Caponnetto

This study aims to investigate the effects of combining 12-week group psychotherapy with yoga exercises on stress perception and quality of life in mental health professionals.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of combining 12-week group psychotherapy with yoga exercises on stress perception and quality of life in mental health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was a parallel-arm randomized controlled trial, in which the participants was unaware of which group was the experimental one. Participants involved in our research were assigned to two groups of separate treatment that followed for three months group psychotherapy combined with yoga program for stress management or usual stress coping strategies.

Findings

The findings did not reveal a significant difference in stress perception assessed in the two groups either before or after intervention but reveal a significant difference in the quality of life in the two groups before and after the psycho behavioral interventions.

Originality/value

The findings did not reveal a significant difference in stress perception assessed in the two groups either before or after intervention but reveal a significant difference in the quality of life in the two groups before and after the psycho behavioral interventions.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

David O'Driscoll

Individual psychodynamic psychotherapy for people with learning disabilities has been more available since the 1980s, with numerous case studies and reports of…

Abstract

Individual psychodynamic psychotherapy for people with learning disabilities has been more available since the 1980s, with numerous case studies and reports of effectiveness, yet little is know about the history of psychodynamic psychotherapy. This paper is a historical account of the international development of psychodynamic psychotherapy for people with learning disabilities. It discusses some of the clinicians' case reports, views and conclusions. It is important that, as therapists, we continue to learn and develop. This is a story of ‘opportunities lost’. Although a number of therapists were well‐placed to develop psychotherapy as a valuable treatment option, it did not happen. The paper discusses the reasons, ranging from widespread therapeutic pessimism to inability in the therapist to process the ‘disability transference’. It outlines the various British contributions before and since the ground‐breaking and well‐known work of Valerie Sinason, whose 1992 book is still the most influential contribution. Psychodynamic psychotherapy has developed more of a tradition than other therapy approaches in this field, but there is still only sparse literature on and recognition of this work.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Graham Barnes

Addresses the problem of psychotherapy coming to understand itself formally as a conversation in which healing of distortions and breakdowns in communication occurs. The…

Abstract

Addresses the problem of psychotherapy coming to understand itself formally as a conversation in which healing of distortions and breakdowns in communication occurs. The paper proposes making concepts the basis for the psychotherapy conversation by linking psychotherapy to second‐order cybernetics and utilizing Pask’s conversation theory. The first part describes cybernetics as the context for the study of the distortions and breakdowns in communication. The second part discusses conversation theory as a formal description of the procedures of psychotherapy, as a way to converse in psychotherapy, as a way to talk about psychotherapy and as a way to change the conversation of psychotherapy. The final part discusses four distinctive characteristics of the evolving conversation of psychotherapy where psychotherapy composes itself as a conversation. These characteristics are what psychotherapy is (its definition), what it is about (its object), how it proceeds (its methods), and what it is for (its value).

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Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Andrew John Howe

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the theoretical potential of applying Jungian/analytical psychology concepts to a contemporary therapeutic community (TC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the theoretical potential of applying Jungian/analytical psychology concepts to a contemporary therapeutic community (TC) within the national health service.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review concerning a Jungian understanding of group psychotherapy and TCs was undertaken. A summary and discussion of a detailed written account of a previous Jungian TC was then conducted. A comparison between a modern-day TC and Jungian approaches was then conducted with an ending discussion on the feasibility of incorporating Jungian ideas into modern work.

Findings

While Jung is thought to have a wholly negative view of groups and group psychotherapy, this was not found in the case. Furthermore, post-Jungian authors have attempted to use ideas from analytical psychology in their group work. While there are some aspects that could be implemented with relative ease in the modern TC, a complete shift into this different way of working would be a challenge and its current evidence base would not support this.

Originality/value

To the best of author’s knowledge, there are no other academic papers that have considered this subject.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Barbro Carlsson, Sheila Hollins, Alf Nilsson and Valerie Sinason

Historically, professionals did not consider that people with learning disabilities could make use of psychoanalytic psychotherapy because of limitations of intelligence…

Abstract

Historically, professionals did not consider that people with learning disabilities could make use of psychoanalytic psychotherapy because of limitations of intelligence (Symington, 1981; Symington, 1993; Sternlicht, 1965). Additionally, many believed that people with learning disabilities enjoyed immunity from emotional stress and psychiatric disturbances (Fletcher, 1993). Maladaptive behaviours were perceived as a manifestation of the condition of learning disability and not as a possible sign of psychiatric disorder or emotional problems. However, over the last decade there has been a growing realisation that people with learning disabilities have emotional problems in the same way as others, but are in some ways more vulnerable to developing psychiatric and psychological disturbances. Psychoanalytic practitioners wishing to undertake outcome research have experienced difficulties in finding a measuring device that understands the subtleties of change in the internal psychological structure over time. PORT and DMT (the Percept‐genetic Object Relation Test and the Defence Mechanism Test) are two projective tests that have been extensively validated in Sweden. This paper explores the use of the PORT and DMT outcome measures in the context of Anglo‐Swedish psychotherapy research.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Nicola Walker, Madeleine Vernon-Smith and Michael Townend

No current psychotherapeutic intervention is designed to enhance job retention in employees with moderate–severe recurrent depression. The aim of this study is to test the…

Abstract

Purpose

No current psychotherapeutic intervention is designed to enhance job retention in employees with moderate–severe recurrent depression. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of a new, interdisciplinary work-focused relational group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment programme for moderate–severe depression.

Design/methodology/approach

The programme was based on a theoretical integration of occupational stress, psychological, social/interpersonal and bio-medical theories. It consisted of up to four 1:1 psychotherapy sessions; 12 work-focused, full-day, weekly CBT sessions facilitated by a cognitive behavioural therapist and occupational therapist; and up to four optional 1:1 sessions with an occupational therapist. Depression severity (primary outcome) and a range of secondary outcomes were assessed before (first CBT session) and after (twelfth CBT session) therapy using validated instruments.

Findings

Eight women (26–49 years) with moderate–severe depression participated. Five were on antidepressant medication. While there was no statistically significant change in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale depression scores after therapy (n = 5; p = 0.313), Beck Depression Inventory-II depression scores significantly decreased after therapy (n = 8; –20.0 median change, p = 0.016; 6/8 responses, 7/8 minimal clinically important differences, two remissions). There were significant improvements in the secondary outcomes of overall psychological distress, coping self-efficacy, health-related quality of life and interpersonal difficulties after therapy. All clients in work at the start of therapy remained in work at the end of therapy. The intervention was safe and had 100% retention.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation was recruitment shortfall, resulting in a small sample of middle-aged women, which reduces representativeness and increases the possibility of methodological weaknesses in terms of the statistical analysis. A definitive trial would need much larger samples to improve statistical power and increase confidence in the findings. Another major limitation was that two of the authors were involved in delivering the intervention such that its generalisability is uncertain.

Practical implications

This novel programme was evaluated and implemented in the real world of clinical practice. It showed promising immediate positive outcomes in terms of depressive symptoms, interpersonal difficulties and job retention that warrant further exploration in a longer-term definitive study.

Social implications

Empirical studies focused on enhancing job retention in employees with moderate–severe recurrent depression are lacking, so this study was highly relevant to a potentially marginalised community.

Originality/value

While limited by a recruitment shortfall, missing data and client heterogeneity, this study showed promising immediate positive outcomes for the new programme in terms of depressive symptoms, interpersonal difficulties and job retention that warrant exploration in a definitive study.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Nancy J. Razza, Daniel J. Tomasulo and Dick Sobsey

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to summarize data on rates of sexual abuse and interpersonal trauma in people with intellectual disability (ID); to demonstrate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to summarize data on rates of sexual abuse and interpersonal trauma in people with intellectual disability (ID); to demonstrate the relationship between such trauma and psychological distress; and to describe a promising treatment technique for such exposed individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature on rates of abuse and trauma among people with ID is presented with particular attention paid to the role of developmental level in both the experience and impact of trauma. Drawing from this understanding of the phenomenology of traumatic exposure in people with ID, the authors present a theoretical framework for psychotherapeutic intervention.

Findings

This paper establishes the inverse relationship between the higher‐than‐average rates of trauma and interpersonal violence in the ID population, co‐occurring with lower‐than‐average access to treatment, and lower‐than‐average treatment model development for this population. Further, this paper provides a description of a theoretically based therapeutic intervention with preliminary research efficacy.

Practical implications

This paper documents three key areas in need of attention in order to reduce the suffering of people with ID: the need to address the high rates of exposure to abuse; the importance of taking into account developmental level when assessing the impact of potentially traumatic experiences; and the efficacy of the interactive‐behavioral model of group psychotherapy for people with ID who have trauma‐related distress.

Originality/value

This paper points to the need for systematic efforts to reduce the rate of traumatic exposure to which people with ID are disproportionately exposed. Moreover, it establishes how important the role of developmental level is in understanding how exposure to abuse may result in the development of psychological disorders. Finally, this paper provides a clear understanding of a targeted therapeutic approach and the need for a system of accessible care so that afflicted individuals may have the benefit of such therapy.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Zoë Meropi Hepburn, Emily Rose Rothwell and Julia Ann Fox-Clinch

To evaluate the effectiveness of an adaptation of Interpersonal Group Psychotherapy (IPT-G), in facilitating short- and longer-term improvements in eating disorder…

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the effectiveness of an adaptation of Interpersonal Group Psychotherapy (IPT-G), in facilitating short- and longer-term improvements in eating disorder symptomology, psychosocial impairment, anxiety, depression and attachment difficulties among adults living with overweight and diagnosed with binge eating disorder (BED).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 24 participants completed measures at the start of IPT-G, mid-treatment, discharge and six-month follow-up. Quantitative outcomes were analysed utilising one-way repeated measures analysis of variance.

Findings

Treatment retention was 100%. Significant improvements in binge-eating frequency, psychosocial impairment and depression were achieved at mid-treatment and maintained at post-treatment and six-month follow-up, and with large effect sizes. Attachment anxiety had reduced significantly at post-treatment and was maintained at six-month review. Body mass index (BMI) had stabilised by mid-treatment and was maintained at post-treatment and six-month follow-up. All hypotheses were supported, with the exception that attachment avoidance did not improve significantly and following a post-treatment reduction, anxiety symptoms deteriorated slightly by six-month follow-up, such that they were no longer significantly different from pre-treatment levels.

Practical implications

Despite being the most prevalent of the eating disorders (compared to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa), BED is under-recognised and under-treated in clinical settings. Results indicate the sustained effectiveness of IPT-G in improving eating disorder and comorbid symptomology associated with BED.

Originality/value

This is the first UK study to investigate the effectiveness of IPT-G at treating BED. Unlike previous studies in the field, this study did not exclude participants based on age, BMI or psychiatric comorbidity.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Isabelle Streng

This article focuses on group work with children using a board game format. Combining the principles of group work and board games helps to engage and motivate children…

Abstract

This article focuses on group work with children using a board game format. Combining the principles of group work and board games helps to engage and motivate children and adolescents to address and work through their difficulties. Lifegames are a series of six therapeutic board games developed for group work with children and adolescents who encounter adversity in their life as a consequence of bereavement, family break up, poor relationships, bullying, chronic illness or obesity. The games facilitate the understanding and disclosure of the complex feelings experienced by children and young people when they are confronted with traumatic life events. The games encourage and assist the participants to obtain and maintain behavioural change. Lifegames are a means to assist professionals in their group work with children and adolescents.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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