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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

William S. Piper and Louis M. Capella

Presents the results of research on male grocery shoppers′ (MGS)attitudes, behaviour and demographics. Demographic data are used asindependent variables and differences in…

Abstract

Presents the results of research on male grocery shoppers′ (MGS) attitudes, behaviour and demographics. Demographic data are used as independent variables and differences in attitude and behaviour towards the grocery shopping task are observed. Preferences for the task, list preparation and task participation are the three dependent variables. The results show that different demographic characteristics account for changes in MGS attitudes and behaviour towards the grocery shopping task. Proposes implications for strategy development.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Art Thomas and Ron Garland

The presence of a written shopping list on a major grocery buyingtrip to the supermarket is tangible evidence of out‐of‐store planning bythe shopper. This pre‐planning may…

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1022

Abstract

The presence of a written shopping list on a major grocery buying trip to the supermarket is tangible evidence of out‐of‐store planning by the shopper. This pre‐planning may influence both time spent in store and grocery expenditure, two factors of importance to supermarket retailers. Set in a New Zealand city, examines the extent to which a written grocery shopping list affects these two factors by comparing the behaviour of two matched samples, one with lists and one without. The findings are conclusive: written shopping lists significantly reduce average expenditure; the presence of children accompanying the shopper significantly increases expenditure and time spent in store. While supermarket retailers cannot dissuade customers from bringing a written shopping list to the store, they can encourage customers to spend more time in‐store, and to shop with someone else, thereby increasing average expenditure.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Lee-Andra Bruwer, Nkosivile Welcome Madinga and Nqobile Bundwini

The purpose of this paper is to determine the key factors influencing the adoption of grocery shopping and to examine the moderating effect of education between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the key factors influencing the adoption of grocery shopping and to examine the moderating effect of education between antecedents of the adoption of grocery shopping apps and user attitude and intention to purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to evaluate the relationship between the latent variables: perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude and intention to use grocery shopping apps. Partial least squares multigroup analysis (PLS-MGA) was used to examine the moderating effect of education. A total of 305 grocery shopping apps users were surveyed using a structural questionnaire.

Findings

The results indicated that all the factors considered in the framework were significant in predicting the intention to use the grocery shopping apps. The findings show that education has no significant impact on any relationship.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the factors that affect the acceptance of mobile grocery shopping apps is important for developing better strategic management plans.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to research the adoption of grocery shopping apps in a developing country, as well as the first to focus on consumers in South Africa.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Kim Ramus and Niels Asger Nielsen

To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and…

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20503

Abstract

Purpose

To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven focus group interviews, four in the United Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework was used to construct the interview guide that was followed in all focus groups.

Findings

An unexpected result of the explorative study was that the seven groups consisting of more or less experienced internet shoppers differed only little in their pool of beliefs (outcome and control beliefs). Beliefs about internet grocery shopping, positive as well as negative, were remarkably congruent across groups. In the minds of consumers, internet grocery shopping is an advantage compared with conventional grocery shopping in terms of convenience, product range and price. Disadvantages, which could act as mental barriers, are, for instance, the risk of receiving inferior quality groceries and the loss of the recreational aspect of grocery shopping.

Research limitations/implications

An important potential limitation of this research is the choice of focus groups as research methodology, which can prevent the elicitation of certain types of beliefs. If important beliefs concern issues of a more sensitive, personal character they are not likely to be mentioned in a focus group. Another limitation is the explorative nature of the research, which makes it impossible to attach weights to the importance of the elicited beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior.

Practical implications

The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e‐commerce.

Originality/value

To shed some light on the role of consumers in an underperforming and understudied branch of internet retailing. Barriers in the consumers' minds to shop for groceries online are identified using an established theoretical framework.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Elin Nilsson, Tommy Gärling, Agneta Marell and Anna-Carin Nordvall

The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive set of grocery store attributes that can be standardized and used in empirical research aiming at increasing…

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3089

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive set of grocery store attributes that can be standardized and used in empirical research aiming at increasing retailers’ understanding of determinants of grocery store choice, and assessing how the relative importance of the attributes is affected by consumer socio-demographic characteristics and shopping behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

An internet survey of 1,575 Swedish consumers was conducted. A large set of attributes was rated by the participants on seven-point scales with respect to their importance for choice of grocery store. Principal component analysis (PCA) resulted in a reduced set of reliably measured aggregated attributes. This set included the attractiveness attributes price level, supply range, supply quality, service quality, storescape quality, facilities for childcare, and closeness to other stores, and the accessibility attributes easy access by car, easy access by other travel modes, and availability (closeness to store and opening hours).

Findings

The results showed that accessibility by car is the most important grocery store attribute, storescape quality and availability the next most important and facilities for childcare the least important. It was also found that socio-demographic factors and shopping behaviour have an impact on the importance of the store attributes.

Originality/value

A comprehensive set of attractiveness and accessibility attributes of grocery stores that can be standardized and used in empirical research is established. The results are valid for the Swedish-European conditions that differ from the conditions in North America where most previous research has been conducted. The results reveal the relative importance grocery-shopping consumers place on controllable attractiveness attributes compared to uncontrollable accessibility attributes as well as the relative importance of the attributes within each category.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Patricia Harris, Francesca Dall’Olmo Riley, Debra Riley and Chris Hand

Grounded on approach/avoidance behaviour theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of grocery shoppers based on the concomitant perceived advantages and…

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5839

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded on approach/avoidance behaviour theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of grocery shoppers based on the concomitant perceived advantages and disadvantages of shopping online and in store for a single cohort of consumers who buy groceries in both channels.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was employed using a sample of 871 UK shoppers who had purchased groceries online and offline. The survey instrument contained items that measured the perceived advantages and disadvantages of grocery shopping online, and items relating to the perceived advantages and disadvantages of grocery shopping in traditional supermarkets. Items were selected from the extant literature and subjected to content and face validity checks. Cluster analysis was used to develop typologies of online and offline grocery shoppers. The inter-relation between the two typology sets was then examined.

Findings

The results of the research provide several insights into the characteristics, perceptions and channel patronage preferences of grocery shoppers. In particular, profiling e-grocery shoppers on the basis of their concomitant perceptions of shopping online and in store suggests that the choice of whether to shop online or in store may be driven not by the perceived advantages of one channel vs the other, but by the desire to avoid the greater disadvantages of the alternative. These perceptions differ somewhat between different consumer groups.

Originality/value

This study makes a noteworthy contribution to the internet and general shopping literature by providing a profile of grocery shoppers based on their concomitant and often conflicting perceived advantages and disadvantages of shopping online and their perceived advantages and disadvantages of shopping in traditional supermarkets. The use of a single cohort of consumers overcomes the bias in previous studies that employ separate cohorts of online and offline shoppers and reveal important insights into the complex perceptions and behaviours of multichannel grocery shoppers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2017

Johan Hagberg and Ulrika Holmberg

Although the movement of goods by consumers represents a large proportion of the economic and environmental impact of the distribution chain, this topic has been…

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1402

Abstract

Purpose

Although the movement of goods by consumers represents a large proportion of the economic and environmental impact of the distribution chain, this topic has been insufficiently explored in the retailing literature. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of shopping travel-mode choice in the context of grocery shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents findings from a Swedish national survey of 1,694 respondents that included questions regarding travel-mode choices and consumer characteristics, mobility conditions, shopping behaviours and environmental interests and engagements.

Findings

This paper shows how travel modes interrelate and how various consumer characteristics, shopping behaviours, mobility conditions and environmental interests and engagements relate to and affect travel-mode choice in grocery shopping. General travel patterns and distance to store are shown to be the most important factors in explaining the mode of transport for grocery shopping.

Originality/value

This paper presents data from a national representative survey and provides novel analyses of travel-mode choices in grocery shopping and the interrelationships among those choices, in addition to the interrelationship between travel-mode choice and the use of home delivery. This paper contributes to a further understanding of consumer mobility in the context of grocery shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Omar S. Itani and Linda D. Hollebeek

COVID-19 and its precautions, including social distancing, have revolutionized traditional retailing- and consumption patterns. In this turbulent environment, the purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 and its precautions, including social distancing, have revolutionized traditional retailing- and consumption patterns. In this turbulent environment, the purpose of this study is twofold. First, this paper explores the direct effect of consumers’ internal/external health locus-of-control on their hygiene consciousness, which, in turn, affects their social distancing behavior. Second, this study posits that social distancing, in turn, impacts consumers’ current online grocery shopping behavior and their future online grocery shopping intentions, thus uncovering important insight.

Design/methodology/approach

To address these gaps, this paper develops a model that links consumers’ internal/external health locus-of-control to their adoption of e-tailing-based grocery services. Data collected through a web-based survey was analyzed by using partial least squares-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers’ health locus-of-control indirectly affects the way they shop for their groceries during the pandemic. In particular, consumers’ internal (external) health locus-of-control drives higher (lower) hygiene consciousness and greater (lower) social distancing behavior. In turn, consumers’ online grocery shopping behavior was found to increase during the pandemic, with their corresponding intent to continue this behavior in the future. Moreover, this study finds the effects of consumers’ social distancing on their current grocery shopping behavior and future intentions to be contingent on consumer age, with stronger effects identified for older consumers.

Originality/value

This study shows how consumers’ internal/external health loci-of-control exert opposing effects on their social distancing behavior, as mediated by hygiene consciousness. Overall, the empirical analyzes corroborate the association of consumers’ social distancing- and online grocery shopping behavior (for consumers of different age profiles), both during and after the pandemic.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Torben Hansen

To empirically investigate whether consumers who have adopted online grocery buying perceive this way of shopping differently from other online consumers.

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11712

Abstract

Purpose

To empirically investigate whether consumers who have adopted online grocery buying perceive this way of shopping differently from other online consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data presented in this study were collected from an online (web‐based) survey of US consumers using self‐administered questionnaires. Data from 784 US online consumers are analyzed.

Findings

Multiple discriminant results suggest that online grocery shopping adopters attach higher compatibility, higher relative advantage, more positive social norms, and lower complexity to internet grocery shopping both compared with consumers who have never bought anything on the internet yet and also compared with consumers who have purchased goods/services on the internet but not groceries. The results also suggest that online grocery shopping adopters have higher household incomes than non‐adopters.

Research limitations/implications

This research used a single respondent as a household representative. Since grocery buying concerns the entire household, this procedure assumes that the selected respondent provides answers which are representative of the household's opinion.

Practical implications

Provides practical advice to online retail managers on how to attract different consumer online grocery segments.

Originality/value

This paper investigates both experienced and inexperienced online grocery consumers. Thereby the paper adds to the understanding on how different groups of online consumers perceive characteristics of the online grocery channel.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Reema Singh and Magnus Söderlund

This study aims to assess factors influencing customers’ online grocery shopping experiences, and it evaluates the central role of customer service and consumers…

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3201

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess factors influencing customers’ online grocery shopping experiences, and it evaluates the central role of customer service and consumers’ responses to satisfying grocery shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was used; linguistic inquiry and the word count (LIWC) method captured qualitative aspects of consumers’ grocery shopping experience, whereas partial least square-structure equation modeling tested hypotheses regarding antecedents to consumers’ overall online grocery shopping experience.

Findings

The PLS-based analysis confirmed the qualitative insights, establishing the significance of customer service, which accounted for 68% variance in the overall experience and 42% variance in customer satisfaction, along with other experience antecedents such as website, product and delivery.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers could further analyze experience as a dynamic process focusing on consumer and retailer brand-focused constructs, specifically focusing on creating a holistic understanding of customer service that establishes coherence between retailers’ marketing values and their customer service.

Practical implications

Managers should acknowledge the importance of customer service in creating a satisfying customer experience, and they should respond to consumer concerns, resulting in enhanced brand-related experience.

Originality/value

Responding to the call for a better understanding of customer service, this study brings out the challenges online grocery shoppers are facing in terms of customer service and empirically establishes customer service as a key driver of customer experience, thereby extending the earlier work on customer service and online customer experience.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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