Search results

1 – 10 of 31
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Stacy Torres and Griffin Lacy

Purpose: This chapter explores the role of life course transitions, personal networks, community, and social support in the physical and mental health of LGBTQ+ elders…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter explores the role of life course transitions, personal networks, community, and social support in the physical and mental health of LGBTQ+ elders. Specifically, we review the literature on formal and informal supports and resources available to LGBTQ+ elders as they age.

Methodology: We use an intersectional lens that explores dimensions of social identity and social location among diverse subpopulations within sexual and gender minority (SGM) elders. We outline the implications of access (or lack of access) to formal and informal care for SGM elders' physical and mental health and well-being in late life. We examine the availability of these supports in the context of broad inequalities and life events that structure the life course for LGBTQ+ elders and have long-term health implications.

Findings: Our findings from this review demonstrate how social factors over the life course shape SGM mental and physical health later in life for aging LGBTQ+ populations. We reflect on how strained relationships and lack of acceptance compel some to seek alternative sources of support and relationships. Our analysis uncovers individual and institutional sources of support: personal social networks and formal spaces, such as healthcare settings, that connect elders with resources to develop social support and avoid social isolation.

Implications: The implications of our review reveal the unique needs and barriers to practical and social support that SGM older adults face. We explore alternative supports that LGBTQ+ elders need compared with their heterosexual cisgender peers, given the disproportionate rejection they face in a range of public and intimate spaces. We conclude by identifying and celebrating sources of support and resilience as LGBTQ+ elders have crafted alternate support networks and advocated for increased recognition, rights, and care.

Originality and Value: Despite some recent flourishing of research in SGM health, a road map for scholars, practitioners, and community members outlining future research in understudied areas such as LGBTQ+ aging and transgender health would help advance scholarship and policy. Our commentary highlights quantitative and qualitative studies and suggests avenues for research that put in conversation literatures on rural studies, urban sociology, and social networks; gerontology; health; and gender/sexuality studies.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Sexual and Gender Minority Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-147-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Brea L. Perry and Allen J. LeBlanc

Purpose: The goal of Volume 21 of Advances in Medical Sociology, entitled Sexual and Gender Minority Health, is to showcase recent developments and areas for future…

Abstract

Purpose: The goal of Volume 21 of Advances in Medical Sociology, entitled Sexual and Gender Minority Health, is to showcase recent developments and areas for future research related to the health, well-being, and healthcare experiences of LGBTQA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Queer, Asexual, and related communities that do not identify as heterosexual) persons and communities.

Approach: In this introduction to the volume, we trace the historical development of research on sexual and gender minority (SGM) health, discussing how priorities, theories, and evidence have evolved over time. We conclude with brief suggestions for future research and an overview of the articles presented in this volume.

Findings: Research on SGM health has flourished in the past two decades. This trend has occurred in conjunction with a period of intense social, political, and legal discourse about the civil rights of SGM persons, which has increased understanding and recognition of SGM experiences. However, recent advances have often been met with resistance and backlash rooted in enduring social stigma and long histories of discrimination and prejudice that reinforce and maintain health disparities faced by SGM populations.

Value: Our review highlights the need for additional research to understand minority stress processes, risk factors, and resiliency, particularly for those at the intersection of SGM and racial/ethnic or socioeconomic marginality.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Lorraine Sweeney

The corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement has gathered great momentum over the past number of years and is now regarded as being at its most prevalent. However

Abstract

Purpose

The corporate social responsibility (CSR) movement has gathered great momentum over the past number of years and is now regarded as being at its most prevalent. However, there has been a lack of attention to, and discussion of, CSR in Ireland and in relation to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). The purpose of this paper is to overcome both of these research gaps and provide deep understanding of the nature of CSR in Ireland. Specifically this research aims to uncover the difference between large firms and SMEs operating in Ireland with regard to their understanding of CSR, the type of CSR activities undertaken and the management of CSR. In addition, this research analyses the barriers and opportunities experienced by SMEs when undertaking CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the relevant literature of CSR. Then, through semi‐structured in‐depth interviews with 13 firms, this study analyses CSR from both a large firm and an SME perspective in an Irish context.

Findings

This paper highlights the way in which firms operating in Ireland define CSR. It differentiates between the management and activities of CSR among SMEs and large firms and uncovers barriers and opportunities experienced by SMEs when undertaking CSR.

Originality/value

It is hoped that this paper provides initial insights into the nature of CSR in Ireland.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

James Baba Abugre

The purpose of this paper is to examine the managerial role in the practices of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing economies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the managerial role in the practices of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an empirical analysis of employees' opinions based on a quantitative survey of 100 middle and senior level managers from four organisations chosen from relatively high impact industry sectors.

Findings

Managerial role in the practice of CSR is limited and ineffective in Ghana. Difficulties of effective CSR implementation mainly stem from leadership weak spots in the form of mismanagement and corruption, lack of leadership commitment and unwillingness to allocate monies due for CSR activities. Organisations can do better in the practice of CSR if management's attitude to CSR, corruption, and work behaviors are positive.

Practical implications

The paper provides valuable information on managerial activities with regards to organisational CSR, and how these can be improved.

Originality/value

Empirical literature on CSR in developing countries is limited. This paper identifies the roles that management and organisational leadership can play in the practice of CSR in developing countries. The paper proposes a universal approach which aims to address the need for adequate and effective enforcement of CSR.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Mauricio Melgarejo, Eduardo Montiel and Luis Sanz

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stock price and volume reactions around firms’ earnings announcement dates in two Latin American stock markets: Chile and Peru.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stock price and volume reactions around firms’ earnings announcement dates in two Latin American stock markets: Chile and Peru.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses multivariate regression analysis to determine the impact of accounting information on stock prices and volume traded around the firms’ earnings announcement dates.

Findings

The authors find that quarterly earnings surprises explain stock abnormal returns and abnormal trading volumes around the earnings announcement dates in the Santiago (Chile) and Lima (Peru) stock exchanges. The authors also find that these two effects are driven by small firms.

Originality/value

This is one of the first articles to study the price and volume reactions to accounting information in Latin American stock markets.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

José Luis Fernández Fernández, Juan Benavides Delgado and Nuria Villagra García

The purpose of this research is to attempt to gain a deeper understanding on small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and point out some of the most serious barriers for

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to attempt to gain a deeper understanding on small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and point out some of the most serious barriers for small Spanish companies to implement such kind of strategic approach and connect it with its day‐to‐day operations.

Design/methodology/approach

After laying out the conceptual framework, and after giving a short description of the Spanish institutional landscape on corporate social responsibility (CSR), the paper focuses on SMEs and the practical issues relating to strategy design, core business and implementation as identified by managers and academics.

Findings

The paper shows a joint venture and a strategic partnership between the Javier Benjumea Chair and a new small Spanish company, in which the partners start a process of mutual help and learning. That partnership is itself an interesting experiment as a case of collaboration between the enterprise and an academic institution.

Research limitations/implications

This is only the first step in generating a model applied to improve CSR uptake at the SME level.

Originality/value

The theoretical goal that is sought after in this paper is how to advance the design of a conceptual model and tools for analyzing and managing dynamically some of the most relevant intangible aspects of an SME, in order to improve its strategic management of the relationships with the stakeholders.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Michael Oshiro and Pamela Valera

This article examines how contact with the police led to the death of Michael Brown (an unarmed 18-year-old Black teenager from Ferguson, Missouri, who was shot and killed…

Abstract

This article examines how contact with the police led to the death of Michael Brown (an unarmed 18-year-old Black teenager from Ferguson, Missouri, who was shot and killed during an altercation with a police officer). And, how Darren Wilson (the White police officer from the Ferguson Police Department who shot and killed Michael Brown) was portrayed in mainstream newspaper articles covering the story of Brown’s death.

Using both frame analysis and Hall’s framework of discursive domains for organizing and making sense of events in social life, we analyzed news coverage of Brown in three of the top circulating daily newspapers in the US: The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. The Lexis Nexis database was used to retrieve a set of newspapers using the search term “Michael Brown.” Articles from the three leading newspapers were collected from the day the event occurred, August 9, 2014, through the end of the year, December 31, 2014.

The news articles used in this study were mostly written with an episodic frame. The articles presenting the socioeconomic background of Brown and Wilson were described as profiles on each individual and the neighborhood they came from, rather than a discussion about where they fell on the economic structure of this country and the larger, upstream forces that might influence those positions. The feelings and attitudes of the reader are also likely to be influenced by details included in the articles and how they were presented.

The findings contribute to the broader literature looking at the relationships between police and Black communities. Public health can play a role in advocating and facilitating programs that build better linkages between police and community. The public health field can take a leadership role in holding the news media accountable when they are engaging in frenetic inaction. Only by having difficult and challenging conversations that examines the upstream causes of violence and deaths like Brown’s, can we make progress in preventing them.

Details

Inequality, Crime, and Health Among African American Males
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-051-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Nina Toren, Alison M. Konrad, Izumi Yoshioka and Roger Kashlak

Addresses the debate about gender‐based leadership/management styles by examining and comparing managerial task preferences and rating of work characteristics of women and…

Abstract

Addresses the debate about gender‐based leadership/management styles by examining and comparing managerial task preferences and rating of work characteristics of women and men in management positions in the USA, Japan, Australia, Israel and Italy. The findings do not support the notion that women have a distinct leadership style, e.g. that they are more people‐oriented than men, or that they differ consistently in their evaluation of various job factors, such as extrinsic versus intrinsic components. However, country of origin has strong and pervasive effects on management style and orientation in these terms. Japanese managers are markedly different from those in other countries (they exhibit a so‐called “feminine” style), while the Americans and Israelis resemble each other. The findings sustain the argument that managerial style is not mainly determined by gender but rather by contextual factors, such as national culture, organization and occupation.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

1 – 10 of 31