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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Gregory B. Murphy and Dennis Smart

This article reviews literatures on legitimacy, trust, and e-commerce and integrates them to propose a model of strategies designed to enhance the perceived legitimacy and…

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1185

Abstract

This article reviews literatures on legitimacy, trust, and e-commerce and integrates them to propose a model of strategies designed to enhance the perceived legitimacy and trustworthiness of ventures.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gina L. Miller, Naresh K. Malhotra and Tracey M. King

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Gregory B. Murphy

Trust has become a major issue among online shoppers. This underresearched subject will predictably determine the success or failure of e-commerce vendors. The lack of…

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1891

Abstract

Trust has become a major issue among online shoppers. This underresearched subject will predictably determine the success or failure of e-commerce vendors. The lack of face-to-face interaction, the inability to inspect goods and services prior to purchase, and the asynchronous exchange of goods and money all contribute to the perceived risk of purchasing online and the resulting need for trust. Trust is particularly critical for small and new Internet ventures confronted by the liability of newness (Stinchcombe 1965). Lacking, among other things, a name that is readily recognized in the marketplace, entrepreneurial Internet ventures require trust if they are to succeed. The research presented in this article addresses this issue by building on the work of McKnight and colleagues and considering the effects of propensity to trust on trusting beliefs. Specifically, the author predicts that propensity to trust will significantly affect perceived ability, benevolence, and integrity but only for those individuals with limited direct experience. Based on a sample of web survey participants, the author found that propensity to trust significantly impacted perceived ability and benevolence for individuals with limited direct experience only. No statistically significant results were found for the effects of propensity to trust on perceived integrity.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Gregory B. Murphy and Robert Hill

Entrepreneurship researchers use various types of screening criteria to select samples for study. In that selecting these criteria is, in effect, choosing a definition or…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship researchers use various types of screening criteria to select samples for study. In that selecting these criteria is, in effect, choosing a definition or model of entrepreneurship, the consequences are immense and have had a direct impact on the generalizability of research and theory development in our field. The purpose of this study is to help entrepreneurship researchers better understand these consequences and, thereby, improve our understanding of entrepreneurial phenomenon. Four of the most commonly used screening criteria are included in this study: firm age, firm size, firm growth, and innovation. Based on a sample of 368 manufacturing firms, the results indicate that few firms fit all or even most of the considered screening criteria and independent-dependent variable relationships vary considerably by screening criteria selection.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Gregory Murphy and Neil Tocher

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) commonly struggle to acquire needed financial, human, and technological resources. The above being stated, recent scholarly research…

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1206

Abstract

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) commonly struggle to acquire needed financial, human, and technological resources. The above being stated, recent scholarly research argues that SMEs that are able to successfully navigate the legitimacy threshold are better able to gather the resources they need to survive and grow. This article provides an empirical test of that claim by examining whether the presence of a corporate parent positively influences SME resource acquisition. Results of the study show that SMEs with corporate parents, when compared to like-sized independent SMEs, have higher credit scores, have more complete management teams, use more computers, and are more likely to be on the Internet. These differences are most pronounced for very small firms and diminish in significance as firm size increases. Study implications include the notion that presence of a corporate parent likely represents a successful navigation of the legitimacy threshold, positively increasing SME resource acquisition.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Gregory B. Murphy and Stephen K. Callaway

The importance of performance measurement is largely undisputed. There is debate, however, regarding the equivalency of objective and subjective performance measures.This…

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1077

Abstract

The importance of performance measurement is largely undisputed. There is debate, however, regarding the equivalency of objective and subjective performance measures.This debate has not considered a frequently used subjective measure, satisfaction with performance, to be an important measure independent of its equivalency with objective measures. Using a sample of 368 manufacturing firms, this study found that objective measures explained only a modest amount of variance in satisfaction with performance and that other variables added significantly to the explained variance.These factors included perceived environmental hostility, vulnerability, perceived competitive advantage, and commitment.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Stephen K. Callaway, Kevin Celuch and Gregory B. Murphy

The purpose of the current study was to assess the impact of information technology on strategic flexibility for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Results of the…

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1258

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to assess the impact of information technology on strategic flexibility for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Results of the study show that under conditions of low environmental dynamism, IT capabilities are associated with greater reactive strategic flexibility. Specifically, IT capabilities enabling the management of internal activities was significant. Under conditions of high environmental dynamism, IT capabilities are associated with greater proactive strategic flexibility. Specifically, IT capabilities enabling the management of competitor information was significant. Managerial as well as future research implications are discussed.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Gregory Murphy, James Athanasou and Neville King

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of organizational citizenship behaviour as a component of job performance. Participants comprised 41 human‐service…

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10921

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of organizational citizenship behaviour as a component of job performance. Participants comprised 41 human‐service workers, who completed a job satisfaction questionnaire and were rated for their organizational citizenship, as well as being measured on three discretionary organizational participant behaviours. Job satisfaction correlated significantly with organizational citizenship and participation behaviours (correlations ranged from +0.40 to +0.67). Findings were consistent with the view that satisfaction may not be reflected in productivity but is evident in discretionary involvement in the workplace. Implications for monitoring and managing a wide range of employee behaviours are outlined.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Rod Green, Susan Malcolm, Ken Greenwood, Michael Small and Gregory Murphy

In recent years responsibility for the administration of schools internationally has shifted from education departments towards self‐governing schools. This trend has…

Abstract

In recent years responsibility for the administration of schools internationally has shifted from education departments towards self‐governing schools. This trend has resulted in major changes to the role of school principals. Such changes in role may impact on the psychological and physical health of principals, but there has been very little research into this population. A survey of the health and wellbeing of a representative sample of 50 principals of State primary schools in Victoria, Australia is reported. Subjects completed questionnaires measuring health‐related behaviour and stress and arousal levels and participated in comprehensive health appraisals. Principals reported better smoking patterns than the population as a whole. Despite a higher socioeconomic status than the population as a whole, the health status of the principals was not apparently better. Principals reported higher stress levels and worse physical health than a group of white‐collar employees of similar socioeconomic status.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Rod Green, Susan Malcolm, Ken Greenwood and Gregory Murphy

The role of a school principal has changed dramatically in the last decade and there has been widespread concern regarding the impact of this change of role on principal…

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1001

Abstract

The role of a school principal has changed dramatically in the last decade and there has been widespread concern regarding the impact of this change of role on principal health and wellbeing. Worksite health promotion programs have been used in many different settings to encourage employee health, but there is very little information on the effectiveness of such programs, particularly in improving principal health. This study evaluated the impact of a 12‐month health promotion program on a group of 50 volunteer principals. Participants in the program reported improvements in their diet and exercise habits and this was reflected in improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol and body fat measures. These results indicate that worksite health promotion can play a significant role in improving the health and wellbeing of school principals.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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