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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Joko Mariyono, Hanik Anggraeni Dewi, Putu Bagus Daroini, Evy Latifah, Arief Lukman Hakim and Gregory C. Luther

A research and development project disseminated ecological technologies to approximately 3,250 vegetable farmers through farmer field schools (FFS) in four districts of…

Abstract

Purpose

A research and development project disseminated ecological technologies to approximately 3,250 vegetable farmers through farmer field schools (FFS) in four districts of Bali and East Java provinces of Indonesia. This article aims to assess the economic sustainability of vegetable production after FFS participation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey randomly sampled 500 farmers, comprised of FFS participants (50%) and non-FFS participants (50%). Based on 1,000 farm operations, this analysis employed input-saving technology as the fundamental model examined using the double-difference method. Simultaneous reduction of agrochemicals and improvement of productivity represent indicators of economic sustainability.

Findings

Results indicate that pesticide use decreased without jeopardising farm productivity; moreover, vegetable production increased. These findings indicate that the ecological technologies transferred through FFS significantly improved economic sustainability performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study purposively selected farmers who grew tomato and chilli. Thus, the outcomes are not generalisable to other crops.

Practical implications

FFS continues to be an effective method for transferring agricultural technologies to farmer communities. Policymakers are recommended to use FFS for disseminating beneficial and sustainable technologies to broader agricultural communities.

Social implications

The adoption of ecological technologies provides positive economic and ecological milieus.

Originality/value

This study employs a double-differences approach to verify input-saving technological progress. Therefore, the performance of economic sustainability attributable to the project intervention is theoretically justified.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Abstract

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2006

Alexander J. Field

This volume of Research in Economic History (REH) includes eight papers, five of which were submitted and evaluated through our regular channels. An additional three were…

Abstract

This volume of Research in Economic History (REH) includes eight papers, five of which were submitted and evaluated through our regular channels. An additional three were solicited from among those presented at the conference “Toward a Global History of Prices and Wages,” held in Utrecht in August of 2004. Because of the emphasis of these papers on data and the relevance of their findings for our understanding of long-run economic growth and development in different parts of the world, we encouraged a number of authors from this conference to submit their work to REH. Associate editor Gregory Clark took responsibility for soliciting, refereeing, selecting, and editing the submissions. We anticipate publishing up to three more of these in the next volume, enriching both REH and our understanding of economic history.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-379-2

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Catrin Johansson and Ann T. Ottestig

The purpose of this research is to study how communication executives perceive their internal and external legitimacy, how they reflect on recent developments in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to study how communication executives perceive their internal and external legitimacy, how they reflect on recent developments in their work, and which future challenges they perceive as being important.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of in‐depth interviews with communication executives.

Findings

Communication executives have a distinct strategic managerial role within their organizations. The executive role involves three different performances: the organizational leader; the communication leader; and the communication manager. Executives perceived high external legitimacy, whereas internal legitimacy varied between organizations, and status and formal position were both dynamic and subject to negotiation. The communication technology development, termed as a “revolution”, has considerably affected executives' work. Future communication challenges such as globalization and organizational change were discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Recent changes have strengthened the roles of the communication executives. Internal status and legitimacy appear to be dependent on the attitudes of the other executives. These relationships and the emerging executive roles will be an important basis for study in future research.

Practical implications

Internal legitimacy was clearly an issue of negotiation, which is important for practitioners to consider. Acting out the educational role, working with communication support and the coaching of managers, and initiating and pursuing strategic organizational issues may be means by which communication executives are further able to enhance their internal legitimacy.

Originality/value

New insights with regard to the legitimacy, practice and self‐perceptions of communication executives are provided. This is the first study of Swedish communication executives, adding to the knowledge base derived from studies from The Netherlands, UK and USA.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Emmett Steed and Zheng Gu

The purpose of this study is to investigate and document current US hotel management company practices in budgeting and forecasting, and to recommend a process to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate and document current US hotel management company practices in budgeting and forecasting, and to recommend a process to improve accuracy and efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Key corporate financial executives of hotel management companies operating in the USA were surveyed. Different from prior studies that surveyed the US property‐level managers, or European hotel operators, the study surveyed the authors of budget guidelines of US hotel management companies with at least ten units or 1,000 rooms, to discover and document the budgeting and forecasting practices of multi‐unit hotel management companies. Chi‐square and t‐tests for equality of means were used to identify the differences between large and small hotel management companies.

Findings

Many concepts were identified that are not found in hospitality management textbooks. Current budgeting and forecasting methods used in the industry present opportunities for improving accuracy. There are also opportunities for time efficiencies, which may lead to improved participant satisfaction. Some significant differences were identified in budgeting and forecasting processes between large and small management companies.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may not apply to independently owned and operated hotels, or small hotel management companies. Future research may focus on identifying economic factors that most influence hotel revenues at the local or regional level. Also, future research may focus on corporate computer software that facilitates intranet consolidation of property level budgets and forecasts and also allows spreadsheet flexibility for exploring various scenarios.

Practical implications

The practical application of the study is the recommendation for a centralized budget process that enhances accuracy, improves efficiency, and reduces “gamesmanship”.

Original/value

There are four main contributions of the study: the obtaining of inputs from corporate officers of hotel management companies with operations in the USA; the documenting of forecasting and budgeting practices of hotel management companies operating in the USA; the recommending of a forecasting and budgeting process that may improve accuracy and participant satisfaction; and the identifying of differences between large and small companies in relation to forecasting and budgeting practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2007

Abstract

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-459-1

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2006

Abstract

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-344-0

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2006

Abstract

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-379-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2006

Abstract

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-379-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Johanna Gunnlaugsdottir

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of studies conducted during the period 1986‐2010 in 75 Icelandic organizations on how employees classified or did not

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of studies conducted during the period 1986‐2010 in 75 Icelandic organizations on how employees classified or did not classify information and records.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used, involving open‐ended interviews, participant observations and internal documentary material.

Findings

The studies revealed that very few of the organizations used a functional classification scheme (FCS) organization‐wide to classify records when the data collection took place. When FCS was not used, records were variably stored unclassified or were classified by the employees according to individualistic schemes made up by themselves. It was further discovered that influential factors in a successful implementation of FCS were user participation in designing FCS, proper training and top management support in its use.

Practical implications

The findings could be practical for organizations that intend to improve information and records management and to maximize efficient retrieval of records for business and legal purposes. They could be a starting point in successful introduction of FCS in organizations, both in Iceland and abroad.

Originality/value

There is a lack of systematic analysis of studies on classification of records and FCS, not only in Iceland but in other countries as well. The findings provide new knowledge on how employees classify or do not classify records and use or do not use FCS and of which are the most influential factors in a successful implementation of such schemes.

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