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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2006

Alexander J. Field

This volume of Research in Economic History (REH) includes eight papers, five of which were submitted and evaluated through our regular channels. An additional three were…

Abstract

This volume of Research in Economic History (REH) includes eight papers, five of which were submitted and evaluated through our regular channels. An additional three were solicited from among those presented at the conference “Toward a Global History of Prices and Wages,” held in Utrecht in August of 2004. Because of the emphasis of these papers on data and the relevance of their findings for our understanding of long-run economic growth and development in different parts of the world, we encouraged a number of authors from this conference to submit their work to REH. Associate editor Gregory Clark took responsibility for soliciting, refereeing, selecting, and editing the submissions. We anticipate publishing up to three more of these in the next volume, enriching both REH and our understanding of economic history.

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-379-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-337-8

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Malissa A. Clark, Gregory W. Stevens, Jesse S. Michel and Lauren Zimmerman

This chapter examines the role of leader workaholism in relation to their own and their followers’ well-being. We begin with an overview of workaholism, along with a…

Abstract

This chapter examines the role of leader workaholism in relation to their own and their followers’ well-being. We begin with an overview of workaholism, along with a description of how workaholism may relate to typical leader behaviors. We propose a conceptual model linking the various components of workaholism to leaders’ well-being and followers’ well-being. In our model, we propose that leaders’ workaholism can negatively influence their own well-being, and also their followers’ well-being through interindividual crossover of affective, cognitive, and behavioral components of workaholism. Furthermore, the negative well-being outcomes experienced by the workaholic leader can also crossover to the followers through interindividual strain–strain crossover. Several moderating factors of these relationships are discussed, as well as avenues for future research.

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The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Gregory Clark

Estimates are developed of the major macroeconomic aggregates – wages, land rents, interest rates, prices, factor shares, sectoral shares in output and employment, and…

Abstract

Estimates are developed of the major macroeconomic aggregates – wages, land rents, interest rates, prices, factor shares, sectoral shares in output and employment, and real wages – for England by decade between 1209 and 2008. The efficiency of the economy in the years 1209–2008 is also estimated. One finding is that the growth of real wages in the Industrial Revolution era and beyond was faster than the growth of output per person. Indeed until recently the greatest recipient of modern growth in England has been unskilled workers. The data also create a number of puzzles, the principal one being the very high levels of output and efficiency estimated for England in the medieval era. These data are thus inconsistent with the general notion that there was a period of Smithian growth between 1300 and 1800 which preceded the Industrial Revolution, as expressed in such recent works as De Vries (2008).

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-771-4

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2006

Research in Economic History volume 24 includes seven papers, four of which were submitted and evaluated through our regular channels. An additional three were solicited…

Abstract

Research in Economic History volume 24 includes seven papers, four of which were submitted and evaluated through our regular channels. An additional three were solicited from among those presented at the conference Toward a Global History of Prices and Wages, held in Utrecht in August 2004. Owing to the emphasis in these papers on data and the relevance of their findings for our understanding of long-run economic growth and development in different parts of the world, we encouraged a number of authors from this conference to submit their work. Three of these contributions have already been published in REH 23, and an additional three are included here. Associate editor Greg Clark took responsibility for soliciting, refereeing, selecting, and editing the submissions.

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-344-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2006

Metin M. Coşgel

This paper provides standardized estimates of labor productivity in arable farming in selected regions of the early Ottoman Empire, including Jerusalem and neighboring…

Abstract

This paper provides standardized estimates of labor productivity in arable farming in selected regions of the early Ottoman Empire, including Jerusalem and neighboring districts in eastern Mediterranean; Bursa and Malatya in Anatolia; and Thessaly, Herzegovina, and Budapest in eastern Europe. I use data from the tax registers of the Ottoman Empire to estimate grain output per worker, standardized (in bushels of wheat equivalent) to allow productivity comparisons within these regions and with other times and places. The results suggest that Ottoman agriculture in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries had achieved levels of labor productivity that compared favorably even with most European countries ca. 1850.

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-344-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-337-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-337-8

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2007

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-459-1

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2006

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Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-344-0

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