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Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

John M. Rudd, Matti Jaakkola and Greg W. Marshall

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Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Debbie Isobel Keeling and Greg W. Marshall

The research landscape is rapidly changing and people need to evolve the way in which they think about publishing their work. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the…

Abstract

Purpose

The research landscape is rapidly changing and people need to evolve the way in which they think about publishing their work. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the new article type – the impact article – which is specifically designed to allow collaborators to showcase their impact work and also share learning about how impact is (or is not) achieved.

Design/methodology/approach

This introductory paper outlines the rationale for the impact article and explains its new structure, using examples from the very first set of five impact articles to be published in the journal.

Findings

There is a clear appetite for sharing and learning more about the reality of impact. Providing a facilitating structure to enable sharing, this study identifies five core building blocks to bringing about valuable impact: problem generation and identifying the impact to be achieved; working with stakeholders; the (co-)creation and learning process; impact outcomes; and the ethics of impact.

Research limitations/implications

The new impact article type encourages authors to explore the impact process from start to finish, and to share learning about the process, including dealing with the unexpected and often changing nature of impact. These important learnings will inform future impact work, especially learning about what can (and cannot) be achieved and in what timeframes.

Practical implications

Collaboration is key to achieving impact. The new impact article aims to give voice to all stakeholders, through co-authorship opportunities and exploring the differences in perspectives on impact between stakeholders, including differing understanding of the ethics of impact. And to encourage multi-stakeholder co-creative working by enabling the sharing of best practice models and methods of collaborative working.

Originality/value

This new type of article aims to celebrate and make explicit the impact of research and so complements existing types of articles that might be separately published on the research itself. The impact article is designed to facilitate knowledge exchange about impact, not underlying research conceptualization and methodologies, but the challenge of designing, developing, tracking and demonstrating impact.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2021

Kelly R. Hall, Dana E. Harrison, Haya Ajjan and Greg W. Marshall

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a rapidly growing frontier. One promising area for AI is its potential to assist sales managers in providing salesperson feedback. Despite…

Abstract

Purpose

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a rapidly growing frontier. One promising area for AI is its potential to assist sales managers in providing salesperson feedback. Despite this promise, little work has been done within the business-to-business (B2B) sales domain to investigate the potential impact of AI feedback on critical sales outcomes. The purpose of this research is to explore these issues and respond to calls in the literature to determine how AI can enhance salesperson adaptability and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from a sample of 246 B2B salespeople was used to test the conceptual model and research hypotheses. The data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The findings provide broad support for the model. An AI-feedback rich environment and salesperson feedback orientation predicted perceived accuracy of AI feedback which, in turn, strengthened intentions to use AI feedback. These favorable reactions to AI feedback positively related to adaptive selling behaviors, and adaptive selling behaviors mediated the relationships between intentions to use AI feedback and organizational commitment, as well as sales performance. Contrary to expectations, it did not mediate the relationship between intentions to use AI feedback and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

The managerial implications of this study lie in explaining practical considerations for the implementation and use of AI feedback in the sales context.

Originality/value

This study extends literature on technology adoption, performance feedback and the use of AI in the B2B sales domain. It offers practical insight for sales managers and those responsible for implementing AI solutions in sales.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Andrew T. Thoeni, Greg W. Marshall and Stacy M. Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to define a typology of strategic segmentation accounting for antecedents (potentially conscious or subconscious) that influence marketing…

3045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define a typology of strategic segmentation accounting for antecedents (potentially conscious or subconscious) that influence marketing managers’ practice of strategic segmentation, thereby formulating a new theoretical basis to bridge the current theory–practice literature gap in strategic segmentation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the resource-advantage theory, this paper defines a typology of strategic segmentation that depicts how a firm’s access to imperfectly mobile resources relates to the marketing manager’s assumed heterogeneity of the market and to the manager’s approach to the market.

Findings

The authors postulate a typology of firms’ strategic segmentation and approach to the market that is heavily influenced, and potentially limited, by the firm’s available resources to effectively segment and address the market.

Research limitations/implications

The typology suggests that resource availability affects a manager’s view and approach to the market. Therefore, testing of this typology should be performed to provide an empirical basis for a taxonomical foundation of strategic segmentation. Empirical testing should examine whether: resource availability is directly related to managers’ views of market heterogeneity, resources are negatively correlated with market approach, market-based intelligence (customer needs) are linked to the market approach, and there is relationship between a firm’s position within the typology and its long-term performance.

Practical implications

This paper provides an understanding that a manager’s knowledge of resource availability may be strategically counter-productive when creating a strategic segmentation. This limitation may lead to short-run choices for segmentation and market approach. Managers should, therefore, consider their strategic goals both with and without limiting their view based on current resources.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first typology of strategic segmentation by considering theoretical foundations of business that could bridge the often-noted theory–practice gap of segmentation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Fernando Jaramillo and Greg W. Marshall

This article identifies the selling techniques that are critical success factors (CSFs) for salespeople who sell banking products and services in Ecuador. The study…

6930

Abstract

This article identifies the selling techniques that are critical success factors (CSFs) for salespeople who sell banking products and services in Ecuador. The study examines the selling techniques that differentiate top and bottom sales performers in the Ecuadorian banking industry. Both self‐reported and supervisor ratings are used to measure salesperson performance. The results suggest that differences in performance between top and bottom performing salespeople relate to the use of five selling techniques: examining records at the prospecting stage of the selling process; approaching prospects using statements about the salesperson, the bank, or the names of persons who referred the prospect; using customer friendly language during the sales presentation; being knowledgeable of the benefits of the banks’ products and being able to clarify the products’ benefits; and ensuring post‐purchase satisfaction of existing customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Greg W. Marshall, Felicia G. Lassk and William C. Moncrief

Job involvement is the psychological identification with one's job. Recent trends in sales organizations have heightened the need for increased job involvement among…

2730

Abstract

Job involvement is the psychological identification with one's job. Recent trends in sales organizations have heightened the need for increased job involvement among salespeople. Little research has been done to investigate the relationship of job involvement to demographic, job situational, and market variables in a sales setting. Results of a survey of 417 field salespeople revealed support for associations between job involvement and these variables. Implications are discussed for sales managers and sales researchers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Greg W. Marshall, Julie Baker and David W. Finn

An often overlooked aspect of service delivery in business‐to‐business settings is the issue of service quality among internal organizational units. Yet, in practice many…

7119

Abstract

An often overlooked aspect of service delivery in business‐to‐business settings is the issue of service quality among internal organizational units. Yet, in practice many organizational departments are service providers primarily to customers within the organization. For example, management information systems, human resources, and purchasing departments all share an important function supporting other employees as they perform their jobs. Managers of those internal service functions are becoming more concerned with delivering high levels of service quality to their internal customers. This article explores the dimensionality of customer service quality as perceived by a set of internal customers of an organizational buying unit, and examines the potential for segmentation of internal customers. Managerial implications and recommendations are presented to aid organizations desiring to improve internal service quality.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 13 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Fernando Jaramillo, Daniel M. Ladik, Greg W. Marshall and Jay Prakash Mulki

In the years since Saxe and Weitz developed a scale to measure the selling orientation and customer orientation (SOCO) of a salesperson, research findings on the effect of…

5005

Abstract

Purpose

In the years since Saxe and Weitz developed a scale to measure the selling orientation and customer orientation (SOCO) of a salesperson, research findings on the effect of SOCO on salesperson job performance have shown mixed results. This article aims to synthesize the findings from the empirical studies to identify the direction and the strength of this relationship. In addition, it aims to investigate the moderating effect of customer type (business or end user consumer) and type of job performance measure used (subjective or objective).

Design/methodology/approach

Research questions were addressed by a meta‐analysis of 16 studies containing 17 effect sizes from 3,477 respondents.

Findings

Meta‐analysis results reveal an attenuated weighted mean effect size (r) of this relationship of 0.14, with a 90 percent confidence interval of 0.04 to 0.23. The disattenuated mean effect size (rc) is 0.16. Findings also reveal that neither customer type nor type of job performance measures moderated the SOCO and job performance relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Although diligence was exercised to reduce selection bias, relevant studies may have been excluded from this meta‐analysis.

Practical implications

Study findings demonstrate that SOCO is an important predictor of salesperson job performance. High performance occurs when salespeople focus their energy on identifying the customer's individual needs and offer products to satisfy those needs.

Originality/value

This is the first published SOCO meta‐analysis.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Ultimate Gig
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-860-7

Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2008

Herbert Sherman and Daniel James Rowley

Derived from field and telephone interviews, e-mail communications, and secondary sources, this two part case describes how Gerald Mahoney, a shoes salesman in a Foley's…

Abstract

Derived from field and telephone interviews, e-mail communications, and secondary sources, this two part case describes how Gerald Mahoney, a shoes salesman in a Foley's Department store, is faced with a problem - Macy's has bought out the Foley's chain and, in doing so, has upscale the product line of shoes and altered his commission-based compensation system. These changes have resulted in less sales for Mr. Mahoney and therein lower commission - a difficult situation since he, his wife, and his daughter were barely getting by on his currently salary. Part A of the case describes an opportunity that presents itself to Mr. Mahoney; to leave his current job with a guaranteed low salary with possible additional income from commissions for a job selling residential homes which becomes purely commission-based to start with after three months of a salary plus commission pay that includes job training. In Part B Mr. Mahoney has decided to take the sales job with ABC Home Builders and receives his assignment. He finds that the working conditions of the sales office are not conducive to selling. His office is located in the rear of a trailer that is extremely run down and is paired with a competitive, noncommunicative saleswoman. The case ends with Mr. Mahoney feeling hopeless and alienated.

This two part case has been written primarily for an undergraduate junior level course in career planning or sales management and deals with the issues of recruitment, placement, training, and compensation. The case may also be employed in a course dealing with human resource management (from an individual's perspective), salesmanship, and organizational behavior.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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