Search results

1 – 7 of 7
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Holly Slay Ferraro, Greg Prussia and Shambhavi Mehrotra

The purpose of this paper is to examine how age norms influence the relationship between individual differences, job attitudes, and intentions to pursue career transitions…

Downloads
1036

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how age norms influence the relationship between individual differences, job attitudes, and intentions to pursue career transitions for midlife adults (aged 35 and above). The authors hypothesized that the effects of individual difference variables (i.e. resilience and reframing abilities) on career change intentions in addition to the effects of job attitude (i.e. commitment) on such intentions are moderated by career youth norms (CYN) which the authors defined as perceptions that the typical worker in a career field is younger than midlife.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 206 people comprised the sample which was derived from an online survey. Moderated regression analysis was used to assess the extent to which age norms operated as a moderator of proposed relationships. Control variables were included based on prior research findings.

Findings

Findings demonstrated that age norms operate as a significant moderator for midlife adults. Specifically, the relationships between resilience, reframing, and commitment on intentions to pursue alternative careers are moderated by CYNs.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from a single source and assessed behavioral intentions in place of actual career change choice. Future research should derive data from multiple sources and assess behavior beyond intentions.

Practical implications

Industry leaders’ stereotypes about the appropriate ages for specific occupations or professions may impact the psychological mobility of midlife workers. Managers may wish to highlight midlife workers with particular skills (e.g. technological savvy), examine recruitment advertising for language that emphasizes youth, and invest in resilience training for aging workers.

Originality/value

Research examining careers at midlife and beyond has extensively discussed age discrimination and stereotypes as potential barriers to professional or occupational change. However, few studies have investigated how age norms and the comparisons people make between themselves and those they believe are occupying the jobs they desire may also pose barriers to career transition.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Rubina Mahsud, Gary Yukl and Greg Prussia

Leader empathy, ethical values, and relations‐oriented behavior all appear to be relevant for effective leadership, but nobody has examined how all three variables are…

Downloads
17196

Abstract

Purpose

Leader empathy, ethical values, and relations‐oriented behavior all appear to be relevant for effective leadership, but nobody has examined how all three variables are jointly related to leader‐member exchange quality (LMX). The purpose of this study is to examine these relationships and test a proposed model describing them.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with a questionnaire from subordinates of leaders in several organizations, and SEM path analysis was used to test alternative models.

Findings

The results indicated that a leader's relations‐oriented behavior fully mediated the relationship between leader empathy on LMX and partially mediated the relationship between ethical leadership and LMX. Recommendations for future research to verify and extend the results were provided.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to simultaneously examine the complex relationships among these four different aspects of leadership (i.e. a skill, values, behaviors, and exchange relationship). The authors' measure of ethical leadership minimizes confounding with other constructs, which is a problem in earlier studies. The practical implication is that leader empathy and ethical leadership should be included in leadership selection and development programs.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Downloads
295

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1910

“WHAT a place to be in, is an old library! It seems as though all the souls of all the writers, that have bequeathed their labours to these Bodleians, were reposing here…

Abstract

“WHAT a place to be in, is an old library! It seems as though all the souls of all the writers, that have bequeathed their labours to these Bodleians, were reposing here, as in some dormitory or middle state. I do not want to handle, to profane the leaves, their winding sheets… I seem to inhale learning, walking amid their foliage.” Thus wrote Charles Lamb, of the Bodleian Library, which is the largest library to bear the name of a private benefactor, and amongst British libraries, is second only in importance to the British Museum.

Details

New Library World, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1940

LIBRARIANS do not desire tribute because, in the clenched antagonisms of to‐day, they carry on their normal work, so far as that is possible. Happy are those who have been…

Abstract

LIBRARIANS do not desire tribute because, in the clenched antagonisms of to‐day, they carry on their normal work, so far as that is possible. Happy are those who have been allowed to continue their whole‐time devotion to library service, because there has seldom if ever been so much opportunity for good work. In some areas it must be limited, because the dark hours are hours of perpetual air raids or warnings of them, and our people in the more exposed towns cannot be expected to attend evening lectures, talks or recitals. A certain amount of afternoon work is possible, if there is adequate shelter in or adjacent to libraries. The confinement to their homes of our readers affords opportunities to persuade them to read, if persuasion is necessary. First we can instil into folk the desirability of always carrying a book, so that when they are caught by a warning they have something with which to wile away the time in the shelter. Then, there appears a chance of drawing attention to the books which we ought to have read but have not, and our readers may be urged to make black‐out hours profitable by special Studies. Few recent publications are better designed for this than the twenty‐one “Suggestions” which have just come from Leeds. Each consists of a four‐page leaflet, three pages bearing carefully selected and annotated titles, and they are on the subjects that matter—Modern Poetry, Voyages, Modern Thought, Without Passport (travel in Continental Europe), Humour, Amateur Drama, Popular Science, Kitchen Ranging, and so on—the range is great; and we believe these are worthy of national circulation. Reverting to lectures, Bristol has arranged its usual excellent programmes for adults and children respectively.

Details

New Library World, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Alex Scrimpshire and Marcia Lensges

The purpose of this paper is to study how the interplay of the emotion of fear and the personality trait of resilience affect time to reemployment after job termination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how the interplay of the emotion of fear and the personality trait of resilience affect time to reemployment after job termination. The authors carried out the research by extending affective events theory (AET) beyond the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper intended to lay the groundwork for future analysis in the areas of fear and resilience, specifically in the time after job termination.

Findings

The paper suggests that fear is a natural response to job termination, and there are two responses to fear: one of action to rid oneself of fear (“fight or flight”) and one of paralysis, in which an individual remains in a fear state. The authors put forth that one's level of resilience is a factor in determining time to reemployment.

Originality/value

While there are numerous studies on the role emotions play in the workplace and in particular, the role of fear about potentially getting fired, there are few, if any, studies on the role of fear after losing a job. The authors feel this is a warranted area of study as fear can have both positive and negative responses. The authors also contend that a major diver of these fear responses is an individual's level of resilience, and this can be a significant predictor of the individual's time to reemployment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Myrtle P. Bell, Daphne P. Berry, Dennis J. Marquardt and Tiffany Galvin Green

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of discriminatory job loss (DJL), which occurs when discrimination and job loss intersect. The paper aims to discuss…

Downloads
1369

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of discriminatory job loss (DJL), which occurs when discrimination and job loss intersect. The paper aims to discuss the antecedents and consequences of DJL and calls for research on the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

Diversity and careers research from management, psychology, economics, and sociology literatures on discrimination, job loss, and unemployment are examined.

Findings

Discriminatory job loss involves discriminatory termination, discriminatory layoff, retaliatory termination, and constructive discharge and exacerbates negative outcomes of discrimination or job loss alone. Antecedents to DJL are the external and internal environments. DJL affects unemployment duration and reemployment quality and targets self‐esteem, self‐efficacy, and perceived control.

Social implications

When large numbers of people experience DJL and long unemployment durations and lower re‐employment quality, this affects the individuals as well as society. In times of high employment, when jobs are scarce, individuals have fewer employment options and employers have more freedom to engage in discrimination. Having large groups of people know that their ability to maintain employment is negatively affected by their demographic group membership while others know that their demographic membership provides employment privileges can result in long‐term negative individual, organizational, and societal consequences.

Originality/value

This paper brings attention to, and calls for research on, DJL and its negative consequences.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7