Search results

1 – 10 of 128
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Marcia M Ward, Xi Zhu, Michelle Lampman and Greg L. Stewart

Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) is being widely promoted in healthcare settings to train staff in evidence-based…

Abstract

Purpose

Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) is being widely promoted in healthcare settings to train staff in evidence-based approaches that promote patient safety. It involves a comprehensive curriculum that spells out key principles and actionable tools for a culture change toward patient-safety-focussed teamwork. Activities begin with selected personnel attending TeamSTEPPS Master Trainer Training (MTT) and then organizing and providing TeamSTEPPS training for staff in their organization. The authors conducted interviews with respondents at community hospitals conducting TeamSTEPPS staff training. To structure the interviews, the authors used 11 key questions identified by Weaver et al. in their in-depth team training literature review. The purpose of this paper is to examine approaches taken by community hospital personnel and compare those to the best practices recommended by Weaver et al.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed 57 staff and administrators at 22 community hospitals sending teams to TeamSTEPPS MTT.

Findings

The authors find that training implementation in community hospitals differs significantly from the established, research-based principles for effective team training described in the research literature, which is largely based in academic medical centers.

Originality/value

The current findings suggest that several TeamSTEPPS training features could be enhanced in community hospitals including: choosing staff who have the skills to be effective trainers in this train-the-trainer model; emphasizing active learning; and sustaining lessons through on-the-job application, practice and feedback. These principles apply to many training approaches employed in small healthcare organizations.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Roland T. Rust, Greg L. Stewart, Heather Miller and Debbie Pielack

Argues that employee turnover is highest among employees who are not satisfied with their jobs. Because qualified employees are becoming more scarce and difficult to…

Abstract

Argues that employee turnover is highest among employees who are not satisfied with their jobs. Because qualified employees are becoming more scarce and difficult to retain, organizations need to focus on increasing employee satisfaction. Suggests that one useful approach for increasing employee satisfaction is to view workers as customers. Based on the notion of employee as customer, illustrates how a customer satisfaction measurement approach can be applied to the measurement of employee attitudes. Suggests that the metaphor of employee as customer is indeed useful. Also demon‐strates how this approach yields actionable results that managers can implement to increase employee satisfaction and thereby retention.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Greg Krzysko and Claudia Marciniak

This paper discusses ways that corporate real estate managers can use creative financial structuring to optimise their real estate portfolios. The corporate real estate…

Abstract

This paper discusses ways that corporate real estate managers can use creative financial structuring to optimise their real estate portfolios. The corporate real estate manager can most effectively arrive at an optimal decision by considering three perspectives: the corporate real estate market, business unit needs, and investor preferences. After gathering the relevant information and evaluating the pros and cons of the full range of financial structures, the real estate manager can make a sound recommendation to the business unit and the finance department. The manager knows that the solution is acceptable to the marketplace, can provide flexibility in the event of a changed business model, and provides the space at the most reasonable cost.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Justin L. Davis, R. Greg Bell, G. Tyge Payne and Patrick M. Kreiser

Organizational researchers have long recognized the important role that top managers play within entrepreneurial firms (Ireland, Hitt and Sirmon 2003). Utilizing Covin and…

Abstract

Organizational researchers have long recognized the important role that top managers play within entrepreneurial firms (Ireland, Hitt and Sirmon 2003). Utilizing Covin and Slevin’s (1989) conceptual framework, the current study explores three key entrepreneurial characteristics of top managers and the impact these characteristics have on firm performance. Specifically, we argue that top managers with a high tolerance of risk, those who favor innovative activities and those who display a high degree of proactiveness will positively impact firm performance. In addition, this study examines the influence of top managers’ prestige, structural and expert power on the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and firm performance. We conclude the study with a discussion of theoretical and practical implications of our findings and suggestions for future research in this area of study.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Kimberly Barsamian Kahn, Kris Henning, Greg Stewart, Brian C. Renauer, Christian Peterson, Renée Jean Mitchell, Yves Labissiere and Sean Sothern

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an experiment to improve residents’ opinions of the police in Portland, Oregon. Officers conducted community engagement patrols…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an experiment to improve residents’ opinions of the police in Portland, Oregon. Officers conducted community engagement patrols (CEPs) in 60 high-crime areas. The CEPs prioritized non-investigative contacts with community members to build trust and promote positive police–community interactions in designated high-crime locations. It is hypothesized that community members living in/near intervention sites would report greater exposure to officers, more positive interactions and feel more positively about police than residents in control areas.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 90 crime hot spots were identified using crime reports and calls for service. Locations were randomized into three groups: 2 CEPs/day (n=30), 4 CEPs/day (n=30), and control (i.e. no supplemental patrols, n=30). Officers were dispatched to treatment locations via the computer-aided dispatch system for 90 consecutive days, resulting in 16,200 scheduled CEPs. Surveys were mailed to 11,760 households immediately after the intervention ended and 1,537 were returned (13.1 percent).

Findings

Residents from intervention areas reported a higher number of positive police contacts, whereas contacts that residents perceived as negative did not differ between the three conditions. Community attitudes, including perceived police legitimacy, were generally unaffected by CEP dosage.

Originality/value

This paper documents the outcomes of a large-scale field experiment seeking to improve public attitudes toward police using directed CEPs in crime hot spots. Whereas the intervention succeeded in providing more opportunities for positive contact with police, attitude change may necessitate longer-term strategies.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1909

THE following abstract in tabular form has been prepared by some junior members of the Islington Public Libraries staff for the use of candidates in Section V. of the…

Abstract

THE following abstract in tabular form has been prepared by some junior members of the Islington Public Libraries staff for the use of candidates in Section V. of the Library Association Examination. It does not pretend to do more than set out the chief provisions of the various Public Libraries Acts in a clear manner, as an aid to the memorization of the principal powers and duties conferred upon library authorities. The whole of the Acts can be purchased through any bookseller for 1s. 4½d., and every student of librarianship is advised to procure them.

Details

New Library World, vol. 11 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Greg G. Wang, Jon M. Werner, Judy Y. Sun, Ann Gilley and Jerry W. Gilley

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extant human resource development (HRD) definition research literature and theorizes a new definition of HRD.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the extant human resource development (HRD) definition research literature and theorizes a new definition of HRD.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted keyword and content analyses to examine selected 32 HRD definitions in relation to different organizational and sociopolitical contexts base on theory development criteria and methodology for definition research.

Findings

From a theoretical perspective, the extant definitions were mostly empirical descriptions of HRD practice with conceptualization being absent. From a context perspective, the definitions were based on HRD phenomena indigenous to the western world, especially the USA and Western Europe. They can hardly explain HRD phenomena in a non-western context. The glaring gaps lead to theorizing a new definition by focusing on the hard core of HRD in defining and criterial attributes. The defining attribute of HRD is its host-system-dependence, and the criterial attributes are its shaping and skilling mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

This study unveils that HRD is a means to support the ends defined by the corresponding host system, and not an end in itself. This definition is applicable to different sociopolitical, cultural, and organizational contexts. It provides clear criteria and boundaries to gauge the relevance of HRD research and shows the unique identity of HRD, thus offering new directions to expand the landscape of HRD research.

Practical implications

The new definition can help human resources practitioners better understand the role and mechanism of HRD that the worldwide practitioners can resonate in various sociocultural and political contexts. Communicating the definition and goals of HRD will enhance internal clients’ understanding and appreciation of the value of HRD.

Originality/value

This study fills important research gaps in HRD definition research. It is the first HRD definition derived through a rigorous theory development process. The new definition connects the HRD research niche to the general human resource literature and lead to new HRD research.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2017

Carolyn M. Youssef-Morgan, Paul P. Poppler, Ernie Stark and Greg Ashley

Much like “Yeti,” the Abominable Snowman whose footprints are everywhere but itself nowhere to be seen, unfounded assertions of human capital as valuable contributors to…

Abstract

Much like “Yeti,” the Abominable Snowman whose footprints are everywhere but itself nowhere to be seen, unfounded assertions of human capital as valuable contributors to strategic success continue to proliferate. Many of these treatments are nonbinding, nonmeasureable, idiosyncratic, tautological, and therefore nearly impossible to use for any comparative market valuation. In this chapter, we selectively review the interdisciplinary literature on exemplars of human-derived capital. We systematically examine specific epistemological strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in recognized theories, measures, and practices. In particular, a multidisciplinary, multilevel, connectionist point of view is suggested. We present the case for an evidence-based classification system of human-derived capital at the micro-, meso-, and macro-levels. Our framework goes beyond static stock models by emphasizing dynamic human-derived capital flows, as well as their within-level and cross-level linkages, all within the context of a modern society that increasingly is networked, fluent with technology, and prodigious with social media.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

1 – 10 of 128