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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2021

Lars Balslev, Sof Thrane and Ivar Friis

This paper aims to analyze the impact of information technology (IT) system implementation on the integration of data and information between sales and accounting…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the impact of information technology (IT) system implementation on the integration of data and information between sales and accounting departments, and how data integration affects relations with supplier and customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The change between three different reservation and distribution systems in an airline company was assessed over 20 years based on qualitative data collected while events unfolded and interviews that traced events retrospectively.

Findings

This study finds that data integration challenges affect the capacity to use revenue and sales data for control purposes and integrating with suppliers and customers. The systems either facilitated the ability to integrate sales and accounting data or enabled integration in wider supplier and customer networks. The implementation of different reservation and distribution systems resulted in a trade-off between integration within the firm and into wider customer and supplier networks.

Research limitations/implications

Data were mainly obtained from the focal firm, Air Greenland. The protracted study period meant that the data were not as concentrated as they would have been had the analysis been performed over a shorter duration or had the focus been on one implementation process.

Originality/value

Extant research suggests that integration challenges when implementing IT systems are caused by differences in information needs between groups with different logics. The authors illustrate how data integration is also a crucial challenge when implementing IT systems.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Attention is returning to Greenland’s natural resources -- especially rare-earth elements (REEs) -- and its strategic location, something China and Russia also recognise…

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Sof Thrane and Lars Balslev

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how contradictions between institutional pressures shape accounting and organisational change within Air Greenland.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how contradictions between institutional pressures shape accounting and organisational change within Air Greenland.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies document analysis and retrospective interviews to trace accounting and organisational change spanning 50 years and analyses developments on multiple levels: societal, governance and micro levels.

Findings

The paper illustrates the didactical development of the organisation and management accounting. The contradictory impetus from the institutional level generates a space where actors are able to affect development and change management accounting systems. Actors at the company level further acted on the institutional level to affect change in governance and institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The case differs from case studies in emerging countries owing to the low number of inhabitants in Greenland, its income per capita and the legislative influence asserted by Denmark, the former colonial power, restricting the generalizability of findings.

Originality/value

The paper extends extant research on development of organisations and management accounting change in developing countries through a longitudinal study of how contradictory demands from the governance and legislative levels affect accounting and organisational change. Moreover, the paper is the first case study to address management accounting practices in Greenland.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2019

Lotte Holck and Sara Louise Muhr

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the construction and everyday maintenance of racialized psychological borders in the Greenlandic Police Force reproduce a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the construction and everyday maintenance of racialized psychological borders in the Greenlandic Police Force reproduce a postcolonial hierarchy of knowledge, where Danish knowledge and perceptions of professionalism are constructed as superior to Greenlandic knowledge and perceptions of professionalism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an ethnographic study comprising 5 days of observation of a training course for Danish police officers going to Greenland on summer assistance, 13 days of observation of police work in Greenland, 2 days of participatory observation of a leadership development seminar in Greenland, 26 interviews conducted in Denmark and Greenland with both Danish and Greenlandic officers and interventions in Denmark and Greenland.

Findings

The racialized borders create strong perceptions of “us” and “them”, which are maintained and reinforced through everyday work practices. The borders have damaging effects on the way police officers collaborate in Greenland and as the borders are maintained through (often implicit) everyday micro-processes, management has difficulty dealing with it. However, the way the racialized borders became visible through this research project created an awareness of – and sparked conversation about – the colonial stereotypes that have constructed and reinforce the borders. This awareness opens up possibilities of collaborative disruption of those borders.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows how racialized borders limit the way professionalism is understood in the Greenlandic Police Force. But it also shows that, because these borders are socially constructed, they can be contested. Making the implicit everyday discrimination explicit through vignettes, for example, offers the chance to contest and disrupt the colonial hierarchy otherwise deeply embedded in the work practices of the police force.

Originality/value

Thanks to unique access to Greenland’s police force, this paper offers exclusive in-depth insights into current processes of racialization and colonialization in a contemporary colonial relationship.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Daniela Chimirri

While tourism scholars have increasingly recognized the significance of collaboration as an essential element in tourism development, there is a lack of theoretical and…

Abstract

Purpose

While tourism scholars have increasingly recognized the significance of collaboration as an essential element in tourism development, there is a lack of theoretical and empirical research centering on (trans)local collaboration as a central means for future tourism development in Greenland. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the conceptual and analytic potentials and challenges of collaboration in an explorative case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies a case study approach to scrutinize collaboration in the setting of a tourism workshop in South Greenland. This research approach is exploratory in nature and focuses on collaborative activities among participants from different research institutions and countries, from Campus Kujalleq in Qaqortoq, from small-scale enterprises and businesses, managers of destination marketing organizations and local fishermen.

Findings

Four “collaborative configurations” emerged during the workshop. These inspire and challenge ways of (re)conceptualizing collaborative tourism development in South Greenland and call for the reconsideration of the present approach toward tourism development for shaping new possible future(s) of tourism in the Greenlandic context.

Originality/value

The relevance of this paper emerges from the crucial significance that tourism actors in Greenland credit collaboration. Moreover, by approaching development issues from within and mutually developing possible practice solutions through collaboration with local tourism actors, the paper aims to give voice to the local community, which currently is lacking in the debate on tourism development in Greenland.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Prospects for the hydrocarbons sector under the new government

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Morten Lie and James G. Clawson

The Greenland case describes the experience of four young Norwegian men determined to set a world record for unsupported crossing of Greenland. The case describes the…

Abstract

The Greenland case describes the experience of four young Norwegian men determined to set a world record for unsupported crossing of Greenland. The case describes the team, their preparations, and their experiences as they crossed in “good” weather that was often whiteout blizzard conditions with temperatures dropping as low as −78 degrees F. Throughout the case, one of the team members reflects on things he learned about himself, about the team, and about leadership from the experience (recorded in italics). The teaching note (available to registered faculty) is supplemented by a PowerPoint presentation that helps introduce the expedition to Greenland, other “risky recreation,” and the concepts related to resonance or flow. A video supplement is also available. The case lends itself to a profound discussion of leadership on its own and leads in nicely to a discussion of world-class performance and the purpose of life, which both startles and pleasantly surprises most students and participants.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Carina Ren and Kirsten Thisted

The study aims to explore the concept of the indigenous and how Greenlandic and Sámi indigeneities is expressed, made sense of and contested within a Nordic context by…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore the concept of the indigenous and how Greenlandic and Sámi indigeneities is expressed, made sense of and contested within a Nordic context by using the Eurovision Song Contest as a branding platform.

Design/methodology/approach

Initiating with an introduction of the historical and political contexts of Sámi and Greenlandic Inuit indigeneity, the study compares lyrics, stage performances and artefacts of two Sámi and Greenlandic contributions into the European Song Contest. This is used to discuss the situated ways in which indigenous identity and culture are branded.

Findings

The study shows how seemingly “similar” indigenous identity positions take on very different expressions and meanings as Arctic, indigenous and global identity discourses manifest themselves and intertwine in a Greenlandic and Sámi context. This indicates, as we discuss, that indigeneity in a Nordic context is tightly connected to historical and political specificities.

Research limitations/implications

The study argues against a “one size fits all” approach to defining the indigenous and even more so attempts to “pinning down” universal indigenous issues or challenges.

Practical implications

The study highlights how decisions on whether or how to use the indigenous in place or destination branding processes should always be sensitive to its historical and political contexts.

Originality/value

By focusing on the most prevalent European indigenous groups, the Sámi from the Northern parts of Norway and Greenlandic Inuit, rather than existing nation states, this study expands on current research on Eurovision and nation branding. By exploring the role of the indigenous in place branding, this study also contributes to the existing place branding literature, which overwhelmingly relates to the branding of whole nations or to specific places within nations, such as capital cities.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Executive summary
Publication date: 21 August 2019

US/DENMARK: Greenland purchase idea is non-starter

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES245947

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Thorhallur Gudlaugsson and Gunnar Magnússon

This study seeks to investigate the image that tourists visiting Iceland in the summer months have of Iceland as a tourist destination, and whether the positioning of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate the image that tourists visiting Iceland in the summer months have of Iceland as a tourist destination, and whether the positioning of Iceland, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland together as one area in tourist markets is possible or feasible.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of two surveys. The first survey (unstructured) measures the holistic image of Iceland with a qualitative methodology. The second survey (structured) measures the attribute image of Iceland in comparison with five other countries – i.e. Norway, Scotland, Greenland, Finland and the Faroe Islands – with a perceptual mapping technique.

Findings

Results from the unstructured survey indicate that tourists have the strongest holistic image of Iceland as a scenic nature destination. Results from the structured survey indicate that tourists consider Iceland to be a safe place to visit, an opportunity for adventure, a friendly and hospitable destination, and a country of scenic and natural beauty. According to the results, Iceland, the Faroe Islands and Greenland seem to have a different image in tourists' minds.

Research limitations/implications

The surveys only report the perception of tourists visiting Iceland.

Practical implications

It is hoped that the paper will contribute to a better understanding of how to measure image and how to market (position) the North Atlantic Islands.

Originality/value

The study shows the value that image can have in marketing island destinations and the importance for destinations in peripheral areas to cooperate in their marketing activities.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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