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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2022

Pallavi Deshpande and Anugamini Priya Srivastava

This study aims to review the role of green training and green work life balance (GWLB) on sustainable organizational performance (SOP) with a moderating variable…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to review the role of green training and green work life balance (GWLB) on sustainable organizational performance (SOP) with a moderating variable “Emotional Intelligence” (EI).

Design/methodology/approach

For the development of the construct of the present study, a Scopus database was selected and research papers published in indexed journals were considered. Relevant keywords were selected and literature was searched on green training, EI, SOP, GWLB. The literature was reviewed to find out the linkage and possibility of development of integrated model. The main focus was on highlighting the relevance of green training on GWLB and its influence on SOP.

Findings

SOP can be achieved with the intervention of EI and GWLB; further green training is one of the influential practices of human resource development (HRD) which helps to develop the green behavior.

Research limitations/implications

It can give new insight to the organization for application of green human resource practices for SOP. Development and designing the cohesive environmental work culture and willingness to protect environment through green training can be implemented by HRD. Perhaps, the application of green training encourages GWLB.

Practical implications

Quantitative research and cross sectional study is required to find out the intervening role of EI and work–life balance between green training and SOP across a broader range of sectors.

Originality/value

This research extends the literature review and developed a new integrated model which shows the link between green training and SOP.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Shamaila Gull and Hassan Idrees

This paper aims to highlight the importance of implementing green training as a part of green management practices in organizational operations by building the arguments…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the importance of implementing green training as a part of green management practices in organizational operations by building the arguments through the lens of Ability–Motivation–Opportunity (AMO) theory. In this regard, the mediating impact of green competencies on the association between green training and organizational efficiency is determined.

Design/methodology/approach

The research followed a quantitative and cross-sectional approach. The study involved ISO-14001 certified textile manufacturing organizations to better serve the research purpose. The responses were collected from 235 managerial-level employees through purposive sampling. The data analysis was performed by using structural equation modelling to examine the interrelated dependence of the variables.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that green training is essential for environmentally responsible organizations to attain their goals of efficient resource consumption in addition to serving the greater cause of environmental protection. There is a dire need to impart environmental-friendly competencies to the employees who resultantly become able to adopt eco-efficient ways of doing business.

Research limitations/implications

This study also has limitations regarding the generalizability of its results. It is primarily because of the limited sample size and restricted geographical domain. Additionally, AMO theory has not been empirically tested in this study.

Practical implications

Progressive textile manufacturers need to incorporate a consistent policy for green management practices to meet the expectation of their international clients and to remain competitive in international markets. It is equally important for the governmental authorities to design such environmental policies which necessitate the need of incorporating pro-environment business practices and measuring their outcomes.

Originality/value

This study will contribute to enrich the literature by offering an empirical analysis of green training for achieving the organizational efficiency in textile manufacturing sector. It will be a novel context to contribute to the literature of green management practices and its related fields. Moreover, the study is one of its kind that uses the AMO theory to identify the mediating role of green competencies for understanding the association between green training and organizational efficiency.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 46 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 March 2022

Nhat Tan Pham, Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour, Muhammad Usman, Moazzam Ali and Hoang-Long Phan

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study aims to apply a mixed-method to enrich the literature by investigating interrelationships among training

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study aims to apply a mixed-method to enrich the literature by investigating interrelationships among training, environmental triggers (environmental knowledge, awareness and concern) and employees' intention to carry out environmental activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This research applied a mixed-method carried out in Vietnam. By using the time-lagged data, Study 1 (quantitative research) was employed to test hypotheses. With Study 2 (qualitative research), four in-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into a few unexpected findings from Study 1.

Findings

Study 1 indicates that environmental training is critical to directly boost not only the three environmental triggers but also employees' intention to engage in environmental activities. The findings further point out that environmental concern and awareness mediate the relationship between environmental training and employees' intention to engage in environmental activities. Unexpectedly, connections from environmental concern and awareness to employees' intentions were not moderated by environmental knowledge. The findings of Study 2 shed light on the role of environmental knowledge.

Originality/value

Based on the conservation of resources and social exchange theories, the research contributes to the existing literature by providing a better understanding of how environmental training stimulates employees' intention to implement environmental activities. The findings may be helpful for managers to encourage employees to contribute to organizations' green objectives.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Ellen Scully-Russ

The aim of this paper is to review the policy literature on green jobs and green jobs training in the USA and to present findings of a qualitative study on the start-up of…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to review the policy literature on green jobs and green jobs training in the USA and to present findings of a qualitative study on the start-up of two Energy Training Partnerships (ETP) funded by the US Department of Labour to train workers for green jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes a review of the policy literature, document reviews, and interviews with administrators, employers, educators, workforce officials. The literature presumes green jobs training will help create jobs and that these jobs will provide opportunities for the poor. This study examined these propositions within the context of the ETPs.

Findings

Stakeholders faced challenges related to a misaligned infrastructure, lack of synchronization in the labour market, and workforce gaps. They responded by coordinating available resources in innovative ways. Though many policy propositions were confirmed, the premise that green jobs are a pathway of poverty was not. Entry requirements were high and programmes lacked funds for long-term education.

Research limitations/implications

Because the sample was small and little was known about the nature of emerging jobs, more research is needed on green jobs and their skill requirements.

Practical implications

The study found that coordination on the policy and programme levels helped stakeholders respond to challenges. Also, new opportunities for the poor may be realized by embedding short-term training in a broad continuum of education and strategically linking both to economic development activities.

Originality/value

Little is known about how training aligns with emerging industries. This study helped fill this gap by examining how stakeholders responded to the demands of the green sector.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Melinda Hollingshed

This study aims to identify the most frequently used tools and techniques within the measure phase of the define, measure, analyze, improve and control (DMAIC) methodology…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the most frequently used tools and techniques within the measure phase of the define, measure, analyze, improve and control (DMAIC) methodology in the Six Sigma Green Belt body of knowledge (BOK) to standardize training curriculum and reduce barriers to Six Sigma adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

This study measures the most frequently used tools within the Measure Phase of the Green Belt body of knowledge by surveying Six Sigma professionals from all industries as to how often they use tools specific to the Measure Phase. Professionals rated ten categories of tools based on frequency use as it pertains to a Green Belt level Six Sigma project. Descriptive analysis, t-tests, and ANOVA were performed on the data using Minitab to identify the most frequently used tool categories.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that the most frequently used measure phase tools and techniques within in the Six Sigma Green Belt BOK are process mapping, control charts, descriptive statistics, graphical analysis, collecting and summarizing data, process capability analysis and Six Sigma statistics (defects per unit, defects per million opportunities, etc.). The research findings indicate that several tools that require a higher level of statistical understanding are used less frequently.

Research limitations/implications

The research study solely analyzed the measure phase tools within the Green Belt Six Sigma BOK. Other Six Sigma bodies of knowledge should be evaluated in their entirety.

Practical implications

Six Sigma training has been identified in previous research studies as a barrier to implementation. By identifying the most frequently used tools and determining that those tools are less statistically intensive, companies may be more inclined to adopt Six Sigma. Reducing the tools required to master to lead and carryout Six Sigma projects can also help to reduce the cost and time required for Six Sigma training.

Originality/value

Many studies have identified the lack of a standardized curriculum for Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma. This research serves to function as a supportive analysis in identifying the most optimal and useful tools to lead successful Six Sigma and process improvement projects and contributes to the journey of establishing a standardized Six Sigma training curriculum.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Anugamini Priya Srivastava, Venkatesh Mani, Mohit Yadav and Yatish Joshi

Sustainability in higher education has drawn the attention of various scholars. However, to date, very few studies have examined the human side of green employee behaviour…

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Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability in higher education has drawn the attention of various scholars. However, to date, very few studies have examined the human side of green employee behaviour towards sustainability. Thus, to address this gap, this study aims to analyse the effect of green authentic leadership towards sustainability in higher education, with the intervening impact of green internal branding and green training.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examined the data collected from faculty and their immediate heads from private higher education institutions. Tests for reliability, validity and internal consistency of measures followed by exploratory factor analysis were conducted for each measure. The hypotheses were tested through hierarchical regression analysis while confirmatory factor analysis was done to test the fit of the model.

Findings

The results supported the fit of the proposed model and showed positive and significant effect of green authentic leadership on the sustainability in higher education. Further, green internal branding had a mediating effect between green authentic leadership and sustainability and green training showed a significant moderating role between green authentic leadership and sustainability relationship.

Originality/value

The study contributes to ongoing research in the field of green employee behaviour, green HRM practices and sustainability in higher education. Further, the study provides practical implications to enable higher education institution to work towards sustenance effectively.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of the under-researched developing country of Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper qualitatively explores the Thai education and skill-formation system and conducts a cross-case analysis of four firms across different industries in Thailand. The empirical findings in this paper draws on semi-structured interviews with various stakeholders; field visits to vocational colleges, universities, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) and firms across industries both in Bangkok and in other provinces in Thailand; and a review of archival documents and web-based reports and resources.

Findings

This paper proposes that firms across industries in Thailand must be responsible for helping their employees/workers obtain the green knowledge and skills necessary to perform green jobs through high-road human resource (HR) practices in response to the fact that the Thai education and skill-formation system is unlikely to produce a sufficient number of employees/workers who have green knowledge, skills and abilities and are industry-ready to perform green jobs, leading to a shortage of employees/workers who possess green skills in the labor market. Specifically, curricula in vocational colleges and universities in Thailand are not likely to respond to the needs of firms in producing those employees/workers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research concern its methodology. This research is based on the qualitative studies of the Thai education and skill-formation system and a case study of firms across industries in Thailand. Thus, this paper does not aim to generalize the findings to all other countries but to enrich the discussion on the effects of macro-level HR policies on the creation of green jobs and the development of green skills across firms in each country. Additionally, it is difficult to gain access to firms across several industries and various stakeholders to understand the development of green skills among employees in these firms. The reasons are resource constraints, time constraints and the hesitation of firms in permitting the author to access the data. These difficulties have restricted the sources of information to construct a more nuanced picture of firms across various industries in developing green skills among their existing employees. Consequently, this research does not include firms in several other industries, including the pulp and paper industry, textile and garment industry, plastic industry and agri-food industry. Thus, future research may extend the topic of the development of green skills among employees to these industries. Quantitative studies using large samples of firms across industries may also be useful in deepening the understanding of this topic, which is significant from the perspectives of the strategic human resource management (SHRM), comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and green economy.

Practical implications

This paper also provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand, other developing countries and other emerging market economies with deficiencies in the national education and skill-formation system. First, the top managers and/or HR managers can apply various methods to internally develop managers and employees/workers with the appropriate environmental/green knowledge and necessary skills to perform green jobs. The methods include classroom training, on-the-job training, coaching, mentoring systems, job shadowing and being role models for younger generations of employees. Second, these top managers and/or HR managers can cooperate with vocational colleges and/or universities in their countries to design educational programs/curricula related to environmental/green management to be able to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for their firms. These managers can request for assistance from universities in their countries when their firms confront sophisticated questions/problems related to environmental/green management. In this regard, universities will have an opportunity to solve real environmental/green problems experienced by industries, while firms can appropriately and accurately solve environmental/green questions/problems. Third, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their firms to apply for certificates of green-/environmentally friendly products or carbon footprint labels from NGOs to foster a green image among firms' consumers. These applications require the firms to pay special attention to the cultivation of green awareness and the development of green skills among their employees. Fourth, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their employees to express green-/environmentally friendly behaviors as well as sufficiency-based consumption behaviors. In fact, these top managers and/or HR managers can foster their employees to reduce energy consumption, including electricity and water, to conserve these types of energy for young generations. Fifth, these top managers and/or HR managers can adopt and implement green human resource management (GHRM) practices consisting of green recruitment and selection, green training and development, green performance management, green pay and rewards and green employee relations in their firms to upgrade both the environmental and social performances of firms. Finally, these top managers and/or HR managers must take serious actions regarding the implementation of environmental/green management policies and practices within their firms in order to facilitate the movement of the country toward the bioeconomy, circular economy, and green economy (BCG economy).

Social implications

This paper provides social/policy implications for the government, vocational colleges and universities in Thailand, other developing countries and emerging market economies where the skill shortage problem is still severe. First, the government of each country should incorporate green/environmental policies into the national education policy and the long-term strategic plan of the country. Second, the government should continuously implement such national policy and strategic plan by encouraging government agencies, vocational colleges, universities, firms and NGOs to cooperate in developing and offering environmental/green management educational programs/curricula to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for those firms. Third, the government should encourage vocational colleges and universities to equip their students with green skills to be industry-ready in a real working context. Fourth, to alleviate the skill shortage problem in the labor market, the government should foster firms, especially private sector firms, to focus on the upskilling and reskilling of their existing employees. With this action, their existing employees will have green skills, be able to effectively perform green jobs and become an important driver to help the country move toward the BCG economy. Fifth, the government of each country should encourage firms to develop green-/environmentally friendly products by offering them various types of incentives, including tax reductions or tax exemptions. Sixth, the government should encourage universities in the country to sign a memorandum of understanding with leading research institutes and world-class digital technology companies such that these institutes and/or companies admit high-potential university students to work as trainees/entry-level employees for a certain duration. This action can ultimately facilitate knowledge transfer from these institutes and/or companies to those university students who will finally return to work in their home country. Seventh, the government, especially the Ministry of Education, should encourage vocational colleges and universities to teach students in the environmental/green management program based on real case studies/problems found across firms. In this way, graduates should be industry-ready to perform green jobs. Finally, the government must pay serious attention to the implementation of environmental/green management policies across levels within the country so that the transition of the country toward the BCG economy will finally come true in the future.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the SHRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and the literature on the green economy and the development of green skills in firms in the following ways. First, this paper focuses on examining how the institutional context of Thailand shapes the development of green knowledge and skills among employees across firms in Thailand. In this regard, the paper aims to fill the gap in the literature on strategic HRM and comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices as proposed by Batt and Banerjee (2012) and Batt and Hermans (2012), who suggested that the literature on strategic HRM should go beyond the organizational context and examine how firms adopt and implement HR practices in response to the national institutional context. Second, the paper aims to extend the literature on the green economy regarding the roles played by institutional factors in shaping the development of green knowledge and skills across firms. Finally, strategic HRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices and green economy studies have overlooked the under-researched country of Thailand. Most studies in these three areas focus more on developed countries. Thus, the findings of this paper should extend the literature on those areas regarding the development of green skills among employees across firms in response to the Thai institutional context.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Pavitra Mishra

The purpose of this study is to explore the status and challenges of green human resource management practices in India, an under-researched area. Further, it proposes a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the status and challenges of green human resource management practices in India, an under-researched area. Further, it proposes a theoretical framework to fill the identified gaps and build a sustainable organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Multimethod approach was used. The research was conducted in two phases. Archival research was conducted in the first phase, and a case study technique was employed in the second phase. In the first phase, an extensive literature review was carried out to gather insights on prevalent green human resource activities and their link with sustainable organizational development. In the second phase, data were collected from the manufacturing organizations to analyze the status of the activities identified in the first phase.

Findings

This study highlights status of green human resource practices such as environmental training, green recruitment, performance appraisal, employee involvement and compensation. The findings suggest that there is further scope to utilize the full potential of GHRM practices for encouraging pro-environmental behavior in the organizations. Analyses of data also reveal that top-management support and mutual learning among departments are crucial to facilitate green behaviors among employees.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a comprehensive literature review of green-human resource management practices. It suggests an interdisciplinary framework for building holistic sustainable organizations by integrating learnings from green human resource management, green supply-chain management, competitive advantage strategy and green corporate social responsibility. It highlights gaps in the system and provides insights to managers and policy makers on building holistic sustainable organizations.

Originality/value

This study fulfills the need to explore green human resource management in emerging economies like India. Studies like these are more important in developing countries, which have alarming environmental concerns and poorly implemented government regulations.

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Abdul-Razak Suleman, Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah, Isaac Nyarko Adu and Kwame Owusu Boakye

Based on the legitimacy theory, this study sought to explore specific Green Human Resource Management Practices implemented by manufacturing firms in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the legitimacy theory, this study sought to explore specific Green Human Resource Management Practices implemented by manufacturing firms in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study purposively sourced data from five manufacturing firms operating in Ghana, specifically, Cocoa Processing Company, Dannex Aryton Starwin PLC, Fan Milk Limited, Guinness Ghana Breweries Limited and Unilever Ghana PLC. The qualitative data from 10 interviewees were thematically analysed.

Findings

Pervasively, it was evident that Ghanaian manufacturing firms have integrated environmental concerns into their human resource management functions, hence they place more emphasis on online tools and platforms in attracting, selecting, involving, training, paying and managing the performance of employees. Lastly, manufacturing firms operating in Ghana give priority to online job applications ahead of manual applications.

Practical implications

In an era of sustainability, green human resource management practices provide a basis for the legitimation and sustenance of businesses through enhanced environmental performance and its resultant corporate image.

Originality/value

The study highlights the extent to which green human resource management is practised in a Sub-Saharan African country and the specific practices adopted in promoting the concept.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Yuh-Jiuan Parng, Taufik Kurrahman, Chih-Cheng Chen, Ming Lang Tseng, Hiền Minh Hà and Chun-Wei Lin

This study aims to construct a valid hierarchical sustainable human resource management (SHRM) model with interrelationships among its attributes in terms of qualitative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to construct a valid hierarchical sustainable human resource management (SHRM) model with interrelationships among its attributes in terms of qualitative information.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the fuzzy Delphi method to validate SHRM attributes and visualize the causal interrelationships among these attributes using a fuzzy decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory method.

Findings

This study finds that green performance management and compensation lead to human resource benefits and economic sustainability in the HRM model.

Practical implications

Open environmental communication, green human resource planning, green training and development, employee eco-friendly behavior and organizational culture are the top five criteria supporting practical improvement in the healthcare industry.

Originality/value

The emergence of new, unprepared, and inexperienced health care entities with inadequate human resource management (HRM) potentially causing social problems within the industry, SHRM is necessary to balance the social, environment, and economic performance and must be studied by both academicians and practitioners. However, the HRM application field is still in its infancy, which limits the understanding of its potential.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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