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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Cagri Bulut, Murat Nazli, Erhan Aydin and Adnan Ul Haque

This study aims to demonstrate how greenwashing perceptions shape the effect of environmental concern on post-millennials purchasing behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate how greenwashing perceptions shape the effect of environmental concern on post-millennials purchasing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on 174 responses gathered through a street survey method from 5 different universities in Turkey, data are analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences software (SPSS 16.0). Principal component analysis is performed to assess the differentiation in factors. Multiple regression analysis is used to examine the effects of the items on the post-millennials purchasing and recommendation behavior.

Findings

The main findings revealed that the environmental concern trait of post-millennials triggers their green purchasing behavior. When the concern on green products is high, the awareness of perceiving that “if the product is actually green or pretending to be green” is high. When the post-millennials take the greenwashing perception into account, their environmental concern has lower effects on their green behavior. The moderating role of greenwashing between environmental concern and green purchasing is apparent. Greenwashing perception decreases the effects of environmental concern on green behavior.

Originality/value

The research raises the concept of greenwashing perception that moderates the relationship between environmental concern and post-millennials purchasing behavior. This study also demonstrates that greenwashing awareness has a critical role in creating a purchasing behavior of post-millennials that have environmental concerns.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Amer Jazairy and Robin von Haartman

The purpose of this study is to measure the gaps between the engagements of shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) in different green

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to measure the gaps between the engagements of shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) in different green logistics practices (GLPs) throughout the key phases of the logistics purchasing process: request for proposal, negotiations, contracting and execution.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of shippers and LSPs in Sweden was conducted. Respondents were 331 firms (169 shippers, 162 LSPs). Mean values of the actors' perceptions were analysed using independent- and paired sample t-tests.

Findings

While this study supports previous research indicating that LSPs engage more extensively in selling GLPs than shippers do in buying them, it shows that this conclusion does not uniformly apply to all GLPs nor all purchasing phases. Three patterns emerged for the gaps between the actors' buying-selling engagements throughout the purchasing process: (1) steady and wide gaps, (2) steady and narrow gaps and (3) emergent gaps. Distinct GLPs were associated with each pattern. It is also shown that the prioritisation of GLPs is fairly aligned between shippers and LSPs.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the green logistics purchasing literature by systematically and simultaneously creating three types of distinction, between (1) shippers and LSPs, (2) different GLPs and (3) different logistics purchasing phases. Future studies could replicate the analysis in countries other than Sweden.

Practical implications

Managers of shipper/LSP firms learn tips to spot the GLPs that their partners prioritise, enabling them to modify their purchasing/marketing strategies accordingly.

Originality/value

The three types of distinction represent a novel approach in the green logistics purchasing literature.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Camilla Barbarossa and Alberto Pastore

This paper aims to address the green purchasing gap by: exploring environmentally conscious consumers’ mental representation of the barriers responsible for the green

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5572

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the green purchasing gap by: exploring environmentally conscious consumers’ mental representation of the barriers responsible for the green purchasing gap; assessing which barriers are perceived as the most relevant in hampering the purchase of green products for environmentally conscious consumers; and investigating the relationships among these barriers. Although consumers are increasingly concerned about environmental deterioration, the current market share of green products remains fairly low.

Design/methodology/approach

An introspective qualitative study is conducted; 51 environmentally conscious consumers showing a green purchasing gap are interviewed, and the data are analysed with a cognitive mapping technique (Decision Explorer software) and Freeman’ structural indices (UCINET software).

Findings

Higher price and scarce availability of green products are the main barriers to green purchasing. However, consumers’ perceptions of price and availability may vary by changing other barriers (e.g. green products displacement inside the store and in-store communication).

Originality/value

This work reconstructs the decisional premises of environmentally conscious consumers’ choices to not purchase green products, identifies the most relevant barriers to green purchasing behaviour and the relationships between these barriers. With this knowledge, marketers of green products can focus on the most important barriers so that interventions in these barriers may change environmentally conscious consumers’ perceptions of other related barriers.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Jie Yang, Yuan Wang, Qiannong Gu and Hongming Xie

This study aims to examine the impact of the supplier's coercive and cognitive pressures on a manufacturer's green purchasing decision-making process and the resultant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of the supplier's coercive and cognitive pressures on a manufacturer's green purchasing decision-making process and the resultant implications in terms of operational and environmental performances.

Design/methodology/approach

Path analysis is performed to test the hypothesized linkages.

Findings

This study finds that the supplier's coercive pressure, environmental focus and socio-cultural responsibility will lead a firm to more successful implementations of green purchasing, which, in turn, results in improved operational and environmental performances. The study findings reveal that the commercial values of green purchasing in addition to social and political obligations will promote the adoption of green purchasing in supply chain management practice.

Originality/value

This study helps business managers understand the impacts of the supplier's coercive and cognitive pressures on green purchasing and the manufacturer's resultant performances. In particular, coercive pressure is operationalized by the supplier's coercive pressure and environmental regulatory pressure, while cognitive pressure is reflected in the supplier's environmental focus and socio-cultural responsibility. This study contributes to the extant theories and enriches the literature on green purchasing.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Meow Yee Foo, Kanagi Kanapathy, Suhaiza Zailani and Mohd Rizaimy Shaharudin

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the green-purchasing capabilities required to ensure the successful implementation of green-purchasing practices under the forces…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the green-purchasing capabilities required to ensure the successful implementation of green-purchasing practices under the forces of institutional pressure. Specifically, this paper explores the green-purchasing capabilities of buyer firms under the influence of institutional pressures in supplier selection, development, collaboration and evaluation in support of environmental purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey method was used to gather data from 163 ISO 14001-certified manufacturing firms in Malaysia. Partial least squares was used for hypotheses testing.

Findings

Green-purchasing capabilities, such as manufacturing, financial, intraorganisational and integration capabilities, have a significant positive effects on green-purchasing practices. However, innovation capabilities have no significant effect on green-purchasing practices. Regulation, customer and competitor pressure positively moderate the relationships between green manufacturing capabilities and practices.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the importance of green-purchasing capabilities in enhancing the green-purchasing practices of firms. The findings that pertain to moderating effect could be used to assist policy makers, particularly in setting appropriate policies and strategies to improve green purchasing.

Originality/value

Although more studies on green purchasing have been conducted in recent years, issues, such as the effect of green-purchasing capabilities on green-purchasing practices, are still unspecified. Besides, this study considers institutional pressure as the moderator when a model is constructed to exemplify the relationship between green-purchasing capabilities and practices.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2020

George Kofi Amoako, Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku and Aidatu Abubakari

The paper examines the role of green knowledge and green attitude in purchasing behavior of the youth in Ghana. This study focuses on investigating how green value and…

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1732

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the role of green knowledge and green attitude in purchasing behavior of the youth in Ghana. This study focuses on investigating how green value and green trust mediates the relationship between green knowledge and green attitude and purchase behavior of the youth in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was used. A total of 417 respondents were selected using convenient sampling method. Respondents were selected at leading shopping malls (grocery stores) in Accra the national capital of Ghana. Data was analyzed using the partial least square (PLS). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to investigate the relationship among the variables.

Findings

The findings indicate that there is a positive and significant relationship between green knowledge and purchasing behavior and also that there is a positive and significant relationship between green attitude and purchasing behavior. The findings revealed further that green trust do not mediate the relationship between green knowledge and purchasing behavior but green value does. The findings suggest that green value is more important in purchasing decision of the youth in Ghana than trust.

Research limitations/implications

Research is essentially cross-sectional and longitudinal studies and can validate findings in the long term. The researchers admit that this research work which is carried out only in Ghana cannot be used to generalize an assumption for the entire youth in Africa and beyond. The sample size could be improved and the study could be conducted in other African countries for the purposes of comparison.

Practical implications

Business managers who are interested in sustainability of their firms and society at large can be guided by this insight that green knowledge and attitude influence purchase decisions of the youth. The findings that green trust do not mediate the relationship between green knowledge and purchasing behavior but green value does will guide managers on marketing and communication strategies especially toward the youth.

Originality/value

The model argues that the youth purchasing behavior is influenced by green knowledge and attitude. The model suggests that that green value is more important in purchasing decision of the youth in Ghana than trust. The model further points out that green trust do not mediate the relationship between green knowledge and purchasing behavior.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Hokey Min and William P. Galle

Over the last two decades, growing concerns about eroding ecosystem quality have led to a renewed interest in environmentalism. Such concerns have prompted purchasing

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11760

Abstract

Over the last two decades, growing concerns about eroding ecosystem quality have led to a renewed interest in environmentalism. Such concerns have prompted purchasing professionals to reassess their current purchasing strategy. To help purchasing professionals configure an environmentally conscious (green) purchasing strategy, the empirical findings from a survey of US firms with greater environmental risks are reported. Based on the empirical findings, aims to identify variables that either promote or inhibit the successful implementation of green purchasing and to evaluate the effects of green purchasing on the firm’s supplier selection, waste management, packaging, and regulatory compliance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Thanika Devi Juwaheer, Sharmila Pudaruth and Marie Monique Emmanuelle Noyaux

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of green marketing strategies on consumer purchasing patterns in Mauritius. The present research also explores the…

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10534

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of green marketing strategies on consumer purchasing patterns in Mauritius. The present research also explores the possibility of introducing greener patterns of consumption into contemporary lifestyles in the current context where green products are increasingly available.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the theory of green marketing to identify how customers are persuaded to purchase greener products. It also reports the empirical results of a consumer survey on green marketing strategies by the questionnaire method. The survey questionnaires were administered to 150 respondents visiting various hypermarkets and supermarkets. The questionnaires were processed and analysed with the statistical programme SPSS, using descriptive, correlation and factor analysis.

Findings

The findings provide some interesting clues regarding customers’ perceptions on environmental concerns and green products. Further findings suggest that most consumers have expressed a great interest in the protection of the environment and they are strongly concerned about the environment and its degradation. Hence, business executives should host workshops and seminars so as to educate customers on environmental protection and environmental‐friendly products. Results also indicated an overall positive correlation between effective green marketing strategies and customers’ purchasing patterns for green products. Therefore, there is a powerful urge for companies to promote green branding, eco‐labelling and green packaging strategies in order to encourage a greener pattern of consumption among consumers in Mauritius.

Practical implications

The paper suggests a stepping approach to consumer purchasing patterns for greener products could be exploited more within consumer groups that have strong environmental concerns and beliefs in Mauritius. The results also offer precious knowledge on the effectiveness of green marketing strategies which can assist both private and public enterprises in developing and designing appealing green products that will be favoured by customers.

Originality/value

Although green marketing has been an important research topic for several decades, hardly any research has been focused on the impact of green marketing strategies on consumer purchasing patterns in the context of developing countries. This paper has analysed the strength of environmental concerns and beliefs and has provided some insights on green marketing strategies and the various managerial implications have been fully addressed in order to favour the consumption of greener products in Mauritius.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Aakanksha Singhal and Garima Malik

In the current scenario, consumers are looking for the well-known brands having quality which satisfies their needs. Most people value the environment and belief to…

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2492

Abstract

Purpose

In the current scenario, consumers are looking for the well-known brands having quality which satisfies their needs. Most people value the environment and belief to protect it. They are aware about the environmental problems, but it is not necessary that their purchasing should lie on this basis. There may be a difference between their attitude towards eco-friendly cosmetic products and the purchasing, which lies on some important factors such as product features, price, promotion and convenience to purchase. This paper aims to discuss the relationship between different age, education and income groups of female consumers with the attitude of female consumers towards green cosmetic products. This paper also highlights the purchasing of female consumers towards eco-friendly cosmetic products and the relationship of it with their attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of 100 female consumers from Delhi region has been taken. Statistics have been used with the help of SPSS. Cluster analysis has used in this paper to group the female respondents according to their attitude towards the green cosmetic products, and factor analysis is used to combine the correlated variables (describing the attitude of female consumers towards green cosmetic products) into factors. Tests such as multivariate test, chi-square test and correlation have applied to find out the objectives.

Findings

It has found that the female consumers having different age and education levels do not have different attitude towards green cosmetic products, but the income level has an impact on it. The women of different income groups are having different attitude towards the pricing and recommendation of green cosmetic products. Second, there is an impact of green cosmetic products on purchasing of female consumers. Third, there is a negative relationship between the attitude and purchasing of female consumers towards green cosmetic products.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, the respondents are taken from Delhi region in India. Future research could consider a larger or different region for different responses. Further, the variables age, education and income level have been considered for this study. For the wider aspect, other demographic and cultural variables such as occupation, gender, marital status and various cultural and sub-cultural variables based on religions can highlight the other way of green marketing effect. Only two dimensions of attitude and purchasing of female consumers were represented. For the further research scope, other dimensions such as consumers’ intentions and perception, availability and price of green cosmetic products could be considered.

Practical implications

The relation between the attitude and purchasing of female consumers are described, which can be helpful for managers for the better understanding of female consumers related with the green cosmetic products and to re-frame the marketing strategies. The low and negative correlation between these two variables can change the existing strategies of managers and can direct the marketers to find out factors which influence this relationship and make effective strategies for positioning green cosmetic products.

Originality/value

This research paper is based on the research conducted through secondary and primary database. The content presented in this research paper is original.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Nelson Geovany Carrión Bósquez and Leopoldo Gabriel Arias-Bolzmann

This study aimed to identify whether attitudes and subjective norms influence green purchase intentions of university millennials, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to identify whether attitudes and subjective norms influence green purchase intentions of university millennials, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. It also analyzed whether purchase intentions resulted in actual purchases and the factors that influenced green purchasing inconsistencies.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a cross-sectional quantitative study with 710 millennial participants, who were university students of the four most populated cities of Ecuador; however, only 126 (18%) participants were found to frequently consume organic products during the last months. The results were tested by the Cronbach's alpha coefficient to determine the instrument's internal consistency. Subsequently, an exploratory factor analysis was developed to verify if the questions were grouped into their corresponding constructs. Finally, the proposed research model's validity was verified through a confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. SPSS 20 and AMOS 24 were used for the abovementioned statistical analyses.

Findings

Attitudes and subjective norms influence green purchase intentions. Although university millennials have high purchase intentions, the majority (82%) did not result in actual purchases. It was determined that consumption habit is the main factor influencing green purchasing inconsistencies.

Originality/value

This is the first study to measure green purchasing inconsistencies in developing countries in South America (Ecuador), exposing that purchase intention is not the best predictor of actual purchases in developing economies. It also provides answers to previous studies that suggested determining levels of inconsistency and attitude-behavior gaps.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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