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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Junqi Liu, Yanlin Ma, Andrea Appolloni and Wenjuan Cheng

This study aims to uncover the black box of the influence mechanism between external stakeholder drivers and green public procurement practice, and meanwhile to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to uncover the black box of the influence mechanism between external stakeholder drivers and green public procurement practice, and meanwhile to explore the moderating role of administrative level in this process. Green public procurement (GPP) has been widely implemented. Existing literature has found that external stakeholder drivers can affect public sectors' GPP practice, however, the definition of its connotation is still unclear, and how external stakeholders affect GPP practice has remained a black box.

Design/methodology/approach

After defining the major external stakeholders, this study develops a multiple mediation theoretical model using survey data from 142 Chinese local public sectors. It aims to uncover the black box of the influence mechanism between external stakeholder drivers and GPP practice and meanwhile explore the moderating effect of administrative levels in this process.

Findings

The results show that external stakeholder drivers have a positive relationship with GPP practices. The knowledge of GPP implementation policies and the knowledge of GPP benefits can both mediate this relationship. This study also finds that the administrative level of public sectors can positively moderate the mediating effect produced by the knowledge of GPP implementation policies and negatively moderate the mediation effect produced by the knowledge of GPP benefits.

Social implications

Local governments need to better encourage public sectors to implement GPP. Managers of public sectors need to pay attention to organizational learning to acquire relevant knowledge on GPP.

Originality/value

This study makes a theoretical contribution to a better understanding of the influence mechanism for GPP practice. This study also provides comparisons of GPP implementation policies between China and European Union.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2022

Ana Maria Dimand

Green public procurement (GPP) may be a viable solution and an innovative policy tool for public managers to address complex environmental issues facing communities…

Abstract

Purpose

Green public procurement (GPP) may be a viable solution and an innovative policy tool for public managers to address complex environmental issues facing communities globally. Given their substantial purchasing power, local GPP initiatives and success can accelerate a transition toward a more sustainable society through governments' influence over the private sector. The study's central research question is: What are the factors associated with US local governments' engagement with GPP practices?

Design/methodology/approach

This research applies the Mohr's (1969) model of motivations, obstacles and resources (MOR) and draws on original, comprehensive and national survey data collected in collaboration with NIGP: The Institute for Public Procurement to explain adoption of GPP as an innovative policy tool. To ensure the robustness of the findings, the data are analysed by running two types of regression – ordinal logistic and negative binomial – using two different operationalizations for the dependent variable, a GPP scale (ordinal) and a GPP scorecard (count).

Findings

The decision surrounding GPP adoption is ultimately driven by organizations’ strategic visions, organizations’ familiarity with the GPP concept and practices, and mandates from the federal government through funding mechanisms.

Originality/value

This study offers guidance to both academic researchers and policymakers in public management and public budgeting and finance on strategies and policy options to expand GPP adoption and utilization.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Conghu Wang, Yuhua Qiao and Xiaoming Li

This paper aims to identify important factors in green public procurement (GPP) implementation and then to clarify how these factors affect GPP implementation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify important factors in green public procurement (GPP) implementation and then to clarify how these factors affect GPP implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied the Delphi method first and then conducted a focused and constrained multiple case study at 18 government procurement centers across China.

Findings

The authors identified four clusters of factors for successful GPP implementation: more clear, consistent and operational policy goals; a nation-wide green procurement campaign to enhance social capital and cultural resources; promoting staff’s ethics, professionalism, capacity and knowledge; and establishing checks and balances among organizations involved in the whole purchasing process.

Social implications

GPP can significantly improve environmental protection and sustainable development.

Originality/value

Based on key insights from systems theory and agency theory, the authors emphasize that GPP implementation must take down its own functional silos and adopt a process approach across organizational tiers to synchronize human resource based and inter-organizational capabilities into a unified whole through information sharing, communications and collaboration.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Markus Amann, Jens K. Roehrich, Michael Eßig and Christine Harland

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of connections between sustainability policy goals included in public procurement tenders and offers and their achievement…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide evidence of connections between sustainability policy goals included in public procurement tenders and offers and their achievement through contract award.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hypotheses based on extant literature and the inducement–contribution theory were tested by means of a survey of 281 procurement files from 2007 to 2009 relating to eight product categories and four European Union (EU) member states. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Findings indicate that public procurement was more effective in influencing socially responsible goals than environmental goals. In terms of supplier readiness, vendors achieved greater progress in delivering green than socially responsible operations.

Research limitations/implications

The collection and analysis of data are based on procurement files, which is a new but also a complex procedure. In comparison to survey data, the data from procurement file analysis are less biased.

Practical implications

Public procurement practitioners and sustainability policymakers should consider the use of public procurement as a lever to attain environmental and socially responsible goals.

Social implications

Evidence has been provided to demonstrate the strategic use of public procurement impacts on environmental and socially responsible goals, thereby benefiting society.

Originality/value

This study contributes in three main ways: first, by adding to existing, limited research on the use of public procurement as a lever of policy goals attainment; second, by examining environmental and socially responsible policy in one study; and third, through providing evidence across EU member states.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Mieko Igarashi, Luitzen de Boer and Gerit Pfuhl

Given the complexity of green public procurement, decisions are likely to be driven by bounded rationality. However, we know little about what determines supplier…

Abstract

Given the complexity of green public procurement, decisions are likely to be driven by bounded rationality. However, we know little about what determines supplier selection criteria in any given situation. This study explores buyer behavior when considering environmental criteria. We first conducted interviews and identified 12 operational procedures used by buyers. We then developed a survey to explore the use of these procedures. Our quantitative analysis suggests that public buyers are motivated by their belief that they can make a difference. This is independent of buyers' experience or gender. However, their occupational position and the nature of a procurement seem to influence how buyers seek information about environmental criteria and which information source(s) they use. The data suggest that four specific decision-making heuristics are associated with the selected operational procedures.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Jacco Robbert Jan van Berkel and Fredo Schotanus

This paper aims to study the short-term effects of a new procurement policy document on the inclusion of environmental requirements and green award criteria in tenders…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the short-term effects of a new procurement policy document on the inclusion of environmental requirements and green award criteria in tenders. The policy document is named “Procurement with Impact” and was released by the Dutch central government to further stimulate Sustainable Public Procurement (SPP).

Design/methodology/approach

Central government tenders were quantitatively analyzed in the six months prior and after the release of the new policy on their inclusion of environmental concerns. This judgment was made based on the role of environmental concerns in the requirements and the award criteria. As a control group, the same was done on a municipal level, for which the new policy document does not apply. Each of the four samples contained 60 tenders. Data was acquired via the European public procurement database TED. In the analysis, a chi-square test was used to measure whether a significant difference exists between the two periods for each group.

Findings

Results show that central government has procured in a more environmentally concerned way after the release of “Procurement with Impact.” Within a year, the number of green tenders conducted by central government significantly increased from 30% to 55%. No significant difference was found on a municipal level.

Social implications

SPP has received increasing attention over the past few decades but has not led to implementation of its principles in most public tenders. As SPP can have a major impact on a more sustainable and social society, it is important to understand how policy can influence the sustainability of tenders. The findings of our study show that “Procurement with impact” had a significant positive short-term effect on the inclusion of green award criteria and requirements in public tenders. Implementing similar SPP policies in other government sectors and other countries could have a substantial effect on the worldwide uptake of SPP.

Originality/value

Procurement with Impact” contains a clear sustainable vision embracing the principles of SPP. This government policy takes into account several SPP barriers and drivers and satisfies several policy theory conditions. The authors show in the paper that this policy is an effective instrument for increasing the inclusion of environmental concerns in tenders. As the difference is already significant within a year, this could also reflect the readiness of tenderers to turn to SPP once there is a clear organization wide policy.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Rikke Dorothea Huulgaard, Heidi Simone Kristensen, Arne Remmen and Carla Kornelia Smink

The purchasing power of public sector organizations can be used to promote strategic policy objectives such as sustainability, innovation, and the concept of circular…

Abstract

The purchasing power of public sector organizations can be used to promote strategic policy objectives such as sustainability, innovation, and the concept of circular economy (CE). In Denmark, total greenhouse gas emissions from public procurement (PP) activities comprise approximately 12 million tons CO2eq/year. Thus, if sustainability criteria and CE are considered in PP, there is a potential for environmental savings and for driving innovation toward circularity. Directive 2014/24/EU on PP makes it possible to include sustainability criteria or CE in public tenders. In order to aid this process, the case company Vraa Dampvaskeri has, together with researchers from Aalborg University, developed a guide for sustainable PP focusing on workwear and laundry services. In this chapter, we explore how this guide has been used in practice. This includes a consideration of the way in which such a guide can aid the process of setting sustainable and circular criteria in public tenders, thus supporting a transition to CE. Although the guide is now supported by national criteria for textiles in the Danish Partnership for Green PP, these tools cannot stand alone, as their use by PP officers is voluntary. Market engagement is imperative for inclusion of sustainability and CE in tenders, and the involvement of user groups is essentially important.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Joey Gormly

It is unclear as to what extent sustainable procurement is being practised in Ireland and what barriers there are to implementing it in organisations. This study provides…

Abstract

It is unclear as to what extent sustainable procurement is being practised in Ireland and what barriers there are to implementing it in organisations. This study provides the first complete insight into the use of sustainable procurement in Irish commercial semi-state bodies. It explores the extent and type of use of sustainable procurement plus identifies and examines the challenges to its use. A deductive approach is utilised to determine the barriers. Eleven participants, nine from the commercial semistate bodies and two experts with knowledge of this subject, are interviewed using semi-structured questions. The research findings show that sustainable procurement is being practised in the majority of the commercial semi-state bodies. Definition of sustainable procurement, the absence of mandatory guidelines, cost, time and a dearth of sustainable procurement knowledge by suppliers are some of the main barriers put forward by participants.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2021

Barbara Allen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the underpinning ideas of public procurement allowed for broader outcomes – a more strategic form of public procurement

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the underpinning ideas of public procurement allowed for broader outcomes – a more strategic form of public procurement – to emerge. The paper contributes to the literature on public procurement by empirically addressing the evolution of procurement as a government policy lever in New Zealand so as to demonstrate how policy pragmatism can ensure a shift without a complete overhaul of a complex system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has used a single country case study to examine a recent development in procurement policy. The objectives of the paper are achieved by adopting a unique conceptual framework connecting ideas, sensemaking and bricolage.

Findings

The paper provides empirical and conceptual insights about how bricolage, or policy pragmatism, aids in dealing with the constraints of ideational legacies. It demonstrates a particular form of targeting in procurement, common in public administration but not well understood in the procurement field.

Research limitations/implications

Single country case studies lack scientific generalizability. However, they add to the canon of knowledge that is lacking in the field of public procurement in this case. They also provide a stronger starting point for further research especially with respect to comparative studies.

Practical implications

The paper provides an excellent example of the development of procurement policy that is useful for procurement officials from other countries undergoing change or looking to update or create procurement policies. It shows a high-level process of implementation for government priority outcomes from a country well-known for its quality of public management and governance.

Social implications

New Zealand has significant equity issues especially as related to its indigenous population. Procurement is being used increasingly as a lever to improve equity. This article includes information about New Zealand's uptake of social procurement.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need for greater understanding of how policy is “put together” and the dynamics at major points of change or the implications of policy changes. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this case study of procurement policy in New Zealand is original, and the author is aware of no other similar work emanating from New Zealand in the academic journals.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Katriina Parikka-Alhola and Ari Nissinen

The “most economically advantageous tender,” as defined in the EUʼs public procurement directives, allows public purchasers to combine environmental aspects, price and…

Abstract

The “most economically advantageous tender,” as defined in the EUʼs public procurement directives, allows public purchasers to combine environmental aspects, price and other award criteria in decision making. The directives do not, however, determine how the environmental criteria should be built. Indeed, there could be different means to assess the “greenness” of competing tenders, and these various measurements of environmental impacts may lead to different assessments of the most economically advantageous tender. In this article, the determination of environmental award criteria is examined through a case study on a purchase of a goods transportation service, where the most economically advantageous tender is calculated by life cycle assessment and the environmental cost calculation method suggested by the EU, and compared to the results gained by the purchaserʼs equation. Also the contribution of the weighting for the “green” purchasing decision is discussed.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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