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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Elsadig Musa Ahmed

This study aims to explain the integration of innovation and climate with the economic growth Green Productivity (GP) concept. This is drawn from the integration of two…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain the integration of innovation and climate with the economic growth Green Productivity (GP) concept. This is drawn from the integration of two important developmental strategies: productivity improvement and environmental protection. Productivity provides the framework for continuous improvement, while environmental protection provides the foundation for sustainable development. Therefore, GP is a strategy for enhancing productivity and environmental performance for overall socio-economic development.

Design/methodology/approach

Three variations of frameworks and econometric model were developed to measure green total factor productivity, green labour productivity and green capital productivity, and their contributions to green productivity and sustainable development; these were based on extensive and intensive growth theories.

Findings

The sustainability of higher economic growth will likely continue to be productivity driven. This will be through the enhancement of total factor productivity (TFP) as technological progress in nations that combined the three dimensions of sustainable development (economic development, environmental protection and social sustainable development via human capital development). Such an enhancement needs to emphasise the quality of the workforce, demand intensity, economic restructuring, capital structure, technical progress and environmental standards. It should be recalled that green productivity through green TFP demonstrates the sustainable development concept of progressing technologically. It will ensure the rights of the future, as well as current, generations for them to enjoy a better life.

Originality/value

The study fills the gaps in growth theories by developing three variations of frameworks and econometric models, and internalising pollutants emissions as private and unpriced inputs in the three models. Further, the green capital productivity model is the sole contributing model developed in this research; it has not been thought about in any previous studies. This study highlighted the green productivity that is ignored by the studies that have been awarded the Nobel Prize in economic sciences in 2018.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2017

Harshini Mallawaarachchi, Lalith De Silva and Raufdeen Rameezdeen

The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to determine the relationship and effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to determine the relationship and effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office buildings in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research hypotheses were tested by approaching the survey method under the quantitative phenomenon. The questionnaire survey was conducted among randomly selected occupants in three selected green-rated office buildings in Sri Lanka. The survey data were analysed by using the Spearman correlation and ordinal logistic regression analysis techniques to model the relationship existing between the variables. The SPSS v20 software was used in data analysis.

Findings

The findings confirm the relationship between built environment and occupants’ productivity. As it further proves that, there is a significant effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office buildings. Thus, critical built environment factors influencing occupants’ productivity and their effect were determined.

Practical implications

The findings could be practically implied as bases to strengthen the evaluation criteria of indoor environmental quality in GREENSL® national green-rating system.

Originality/value

The evaluation of occupants’ productivity and the built environment factors has been at the focal point of research; however, most studies have focused on single aspects of the built environment. Further, no evidences were found on “which factors” can critically influence the occupants’ productivity in green buildings. The paper, therefore, seeks to fill this gap by proving the relationship between green built environment and occupants’ productivity.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Fang Chen, Thomas Ngniatedema and Suhong Li

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between green initiatives, green performance, and a firm’s financial performance in the world. The existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between green initiatives, green performance, and a firm’s financial performance in the world. The existing literature on environmental initiatives and their impacts is limited to the context of a particular country. This gap points to a lack of clarification of variations in environmental regulation and in economic disparity which may affect the impact of green initiatives on green performance and on financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the world top 500 publicly traded companies are collected from Compustat, a database of financial, statistical and market information on global companies, and from Newsweek, an information gatekeeper that enables consumers to access a list of environmentally friendly companies. The paper adopts linear regression to test the relationships between variables.

Findings

The results show that green initiatives have a positive impact on green performance, which in turn has a positive impact on financial performance. However, the impact of green initiatives varies by country. The study revealed that companies in European countries and Canada lead in the green initiatives and green performance, followed by the USA and Japan. China and Hong Kong lag behind compared to other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size in some of the countries used in this study may impact the validity of the results.

Practical implications

This study suggests that companies that seek financial benefits of pursuing green initiatives should have a long-term orientation when implementing these initiatives and should consider the country where they operate.

Originality/value

The current study provides a global understanding of the relationship between green initiatives, green performance, and financial performance, and contributes to the literature by highlighting variation among countries and by year.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

R.P. Mohanty and S.G. Deshmukh

Productivity is concerned with the effective and efficient transformation of resources into desired outputs. Manufacturing, traditionally, has paid great attention to this…

Abstract

Productivity is concerned with the effective and efficient transformation of resources into desired outputs. Manufacturing, traditionally, has paid great attention to this conversion in terms of its effect on organisational profit but not on its harmful environmental effects. As pressures rise to establish “green manufacturing” processes, the issue becomes one of both being seen as socially responsible, and as conforming to increasing legislative and regulatory frameworks. “Green manufacturing” implies the minimisation of (especially harmful) waste. Introduces a particular approach to addressing the concept of “wastivity” (a variation on productivity that involves the identification of both “structural” and operational waste) and describes a case study in an Indian manufacturing organisation at which the approach was used.

Details

Work Study, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Elsadig Musa Ahmed and Rahim Kialashki

The purpose of this paper is to measure the factors determining the productivity development in the Asia Pacific countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the factors determining the productivity development in the Asia Pacific countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Philippines, Thailand, China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia and New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The extensive growth theory that is expressed as the decomposition of the contribution of changes in employment, physical capital, foreign direct investment (FDI), human capital (HC), telecommunications investment and total factor productivity (TFP) growth on the selected Asia-Pacific countries’ output growth is used in this study. In this respect, an annual time series data over the period 1970-2012 for the aforementioned variables are employed.

Findings

The study found that the FDI spillover effects through the TFP are considered as productivity-driven economic growth in which the FDI spillover effects have significant effect on the productivity growth of the majority of these countries. It should be noted that most of these countries showed technological progress through the FDI spillover effects that is translated into a form of technology transfer and HC skills development.

Originality/value

This study empirically compared the FDI spillover effects on sustainable productivity growth of the most growing countries in the Asia Pacific region by using modified extensive growth theory that closed the gaps in the past studies and addressed the issues of technology transfer, HC development and sustainable productivity growth brought by the technical progress in these countries through the FDI spillover effects on productivity growth.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Jung Ying Liu, Sui Pheng Low and Xi He

Green building has become increasingly significant in China, with hundreds of projects being certified. While this has been the case, the driving and impeding factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Green building has become increasingly significant in China, with hundreds of projects being certified. While this has been the case, the driving and impeding factors behind this have remained unclear. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the green practices in China and to investigate the current status and the driving and impeding factors for green practices in the Chinese building industry.

Design/methodology/approach

After a comprehensive review of the pertinent literature, this study first describes major environmental changes in China. Next, this study conducts an industry‐wide survey, with 65 completed responses received that form the analysis of this research.

Findings

The results of the survey showed that “to obtain countenance and incentives from the government” appears to be the dominant motivation for green practices. “High fabrication cost” in design and “cost control” in construction were considered to be the largest obstacles encountered. “Lack of application experience” seems to be the largest obstacle faced in certification. The respondents seem to disagree much on the advantages of green buildings over conventional ones. The study also found that “countenance and incentives from the government” were the most significant driving force behind the rapid expansion of the green building industry in China.

Originality/value

A clearer understanding of the perceptions of industry practitioners would assist those in the green building industry to better appreciate their shortcomings and to inspire new ways of improving performance of the green building industry. Although the future of the green building sector in China is promising, this industry still faces significant obstacles in technologies relating to design, production and manufacturing as well as in “soft” skills relating to regulations, management and stimulation.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Ching‐Hsun Chang and Yu‐Shan Chen

This study aims to develop an original framework of green intellectual capital to explore the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on green

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop an original framework of green intellectual capital to explore the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on green intellectual capital through the partial mediator ‐ environmental consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study summarizes the concepts of CSR and green management to develop an integral framework to enhance green intellectual capital. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to verify the research framework.

Findings

This study utilizes SEM to explore the influences of CSR and environmental consciousness on three types of green intellectual capital – green human capital, green structural capital, and green relationship capital. The empirical results of this study demonstrate that CSR and environmental consciousness have positive effects on three types of green intellectual capital. Besides, this study verifies that environmental consciousness is a partial mediator between CSR and three types of green intellectual capital. In addition, this study classifies the Taiwanese manufacturing companies into three groups – highly, medially, and lowly ethic companies. The results show that three types of green intellectual capital of highly ethic companies are the most, and those of medially ethic companies are the next, while those of lowly ethic companies are the least.

Originality/value

This study integrates the theories of CSR and green management to develop an integral conceptual model of green intellectual capital to explore its managerial implications and determinants.

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Wenting Zhan, Wei Pan and Le Chen

While the investment in construction projects has increased over the past few decades, low construction project productivity (CPP) appeared to be persistent, thereby…

Abstract

Purpose

While the investment in construction projects has increased over the past few decades, low construction project productivity (CPP) appeared to be persistent, thereby reflecting an “investment-in-failure” paradox between the investment and CPP. Hence, this paper aims to develop a systematic and holistic CPP evaluation framework to explain the apparent paradox in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first reviews the literature about the theories of system, production, principal–agent and project success evaluation to re-conceptualise the CPP and proposes a two-stage CPP evaluation framework. The framework is subsequently explored through a sequential qualitative mixed-methods design within the context of the Hong Kong construction industry by combining 32 semi-structured interviews with senior industry experts and exploratory case studies, with three real-life construction projects.

Findings

The paper identifies three system boundaries for CPP evaluation, that is, parameter, timeframe and stakeholder, and develops a two-stage CPP evaluation framework to indicate site efficiency and utilisation effectiveness, thereby accessing the productivity of both the construction and post-construction stages. The “investment-in-failure” paradox associated with current CPP evaluation approaches is primarily attributed to the narrowly defined CPP boundaries.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative exploration of the evaluation framework only focusses on the Hong Kong construction industry. Further case studies within other urban contexts could be used to improve the generalisability of the findings. Quantitative research is also necessary to advance theoretical development of the two-stage CPP evaluation.

Practical implications

The systemic CPP conceptualisation and the two-stage CPP evaluation framework support the systems thinking of industry stakeholders and enable them to formulate holistic strategies for long-term CPP enhancement.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates the needs to expand the system boundaries of CPP to reflect its systemic value and to shift the paradigm of CPP evaluation from being output-orientated and quantity-focussed to being outcome-orientated and value-focussed.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Elsadig Musa Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to explain bio-economy dimensions as a new stream of knowledge-based economy that exists in the new era of the information and communications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain bio-economy dimensions as a new stream of knowledge-based economy that exists in the new era of the information and communications technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Bio-economy refers to the production of a wide range of goods and services from plant, animal and forest-based material. It is more than just grain-based bio-fuels or bio-diesel as extensively highlighted in Latin America. It is related to biotechnology and other bio-activities based on knowledge generated from the bio-activities and extension of the knowledge-based economy.

Findings

The main concern of developing bio-economy is the environmental damage caused through the undesirable output produced by the bio-economy activities. Bio-economy is centred on research and development (R&D) collaborations across different sectors, including the public and private sectors, in order to breakthrough new products through invention and innovation.

Originality/value

For bio-economy to be realised and put into practice, it should have a well-developed regulatory framework as a platform in order to run and work smoothly.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sanjay Sharma and Mohd. Asif Gandhi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the peer-reviewed literature, as well as literature written by practitioners having authority on green supply chains and allied…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the peer-reviewed literature, as well as literature written by practitioners having authority on green supply chains and allied areas with a view to identify future research directions with the help of an extensive literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with this objective, the constructs “Green Supply Chain Practices” and “Green Supply Chain Performance” were the two terms that were identified for a co-relational study.

Findings

As indicated by the literature review, there is a need to do a more detailed study that can pinpoint particular components of green supply chain practices that have a strong association with particular components of green supply chain performance. This paper attempts to achieve the aim by using a different connotation of these two constructs.

Originality/value

Such a study with the connotation and components of green supply chain (GSC) practices and GSC performance as identified and used in this paper might not have been conducted before in the way it is proposed to be used in this paper, thus making this an appropriate contribution. Accordingly, a framework for the research has been depicted, and research questions have been framed.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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