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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Leslie Lu, Dora Bock and Mathew Joseph

To develop an understanding of the Millennial Generation's consumption of green products. Specifically, our research sought to address the following two research questions

Abstract

Purpose

To develop an understanding of the Millennial Generation's consumption of green products. Specifically, our research sought to address the following two research questions in regard to this generation's consumption behavior: What product attributes have significant effects on purchases of green products? What are the primary reasons for not adopting green products?

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to 197 undergraduates at a private university in the southern US. The sample was 59 percent female and ages ranged from less than 18 to 25. Full time students represented 95 percent of the sample.

Findings

The findings suggest that when developing marketing communications, marketers may want to devote more attention to recyclability or re-usability, biodegradableness, and positive health effects stemming from eco-friendly product attributes, as these characteristics shared the strongest associations with Millennial intent to purchase green products. The results also indicate that the primary reason Millennials do not purchase green products is the belief that green products are too expensive.

Research limitations/implications

To capture opinions of members of the Millennial Generation, the study used a sample of students at a private university which may not be representative of the entire population of Millennials. Since all participants were enrolled in higher education, there may be some relationship between education and green consumption behavior.

Originality/value

This research offers marketers a richer understanding of this segments' consumption behavior of green products, in addition to highlighting important obstacles marketers need to overcome to transition non-purchasers to purchasers of green products.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Dan Shi, Weijia Zhang, Guangyu Zou and Jinkun Ping

The purpose of this paper is to explore the operation strategies of a manufacturer who produces brown and green product simultaneously.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the operation strategies of a manufacturer who produces brown and green product simultaneously.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors establish three models to examine the joint decisions of pricing and advertising. Three advertising strategies are: non-advertising investment (NA), advertising investment for brown product (BA) and advertising investment for green product (GA).

Findings

The theoretical analysis shows that advertising investment can substantially increase the product greening level and manufacturer's profit. More importantly, we find that the GA strategy is more likely to be the best strategy as the advertising investment efficiency increases. The BA strategy is more likely to be preferred as the R&D cost increases. Finally, the modeling results are verified by numerical experiments, and more insights are obtained.

Research limitations/implications

This paper considers the case in which a single manufacturer produces the brown and green product simultaneously. In fact, many manufacturers in the market produce brown and green product at the same time. Furthermore, in addition to advertising investment for brown product and green product, manufacturers can also invest in advertising for brands.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the investigations on green production and advertising decisions of a manufacturer who produces brown and green products simultaneously.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Ihwan Ghazali, Salwa Hanim Abdul-Rashid, Siti Zawiah Md Dawal, Hideki Aoyama, Novita Sakundarini, Fu Haw Ho and Safarudin Gazali Herawan

There is an increasing awareness among manufacturers to make production more sustainable in Southeast Asian countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia. Manufacturers are now…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increasing awareness among manufacturers to make production more sustainable in Southeast Asian countries such as Malaysia and Indonesia. Manufacturers are now urged to not only focus on the business profit but also concern on environment protection by producing green products. However, issues may arise regarding the preferences of customers on green products, which will vary due to the influence of cultural values. This will give an impact on the marketing of green products. The aim of this study is to identify the influence of cultural values on the green products design in Malaysia and Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A pretest on the survey instruments was performed to ensure the reliability and validity of the questionnaire. The collected data were statistically analyzed based on the satisfaction level, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results showed that customer preferences in Malaysia were mostly influenced by uncertainty avoidance, long-term orientation and power distance, excluding collectivism and masculinity. In Indonesia, the dimension of uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation had significant influence, whereas power distance, masculinity and collectivism dimension had no influence. Eco-label was identified as the most important factor for green products in Malaysia and having product services characteristics factor for product lifetime extension in Indonesia.

Practical implications

For practices, the cultural values and preferred characteristics identified in this study provide valuable information to policymakers and businesses on what draws customers toward green products in Malaysia and Indonesia. This finding can be used as supported data for the policymakers in order to achieve sustainable development goal (SDGs) in Malaysia and Indonesia.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide valuable information for designers to design products with green characteristics that cater to the consumer market in Malaysia and Indonesia, as well as other countries which may have similar cultural traits.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Yugang Yu, Xin Zhang, Xiong Zhang and Wei T. Yue

New information technologies such as IoT and big data analytics have reshaped the development of smart green products. These products exhibit two important features that…

Abstract

Purpose

New information technologies such as IoT and big data analytics have reshaped the development of smart green products. These products exhibit two important features that are not seen in traditional products: environmental friendliness and data network effect. Based on these unique features, the authors investigate a firm's optimal selling strategy of smart green products from both the profitability and environmental perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors establish stylized models to consider the optimality of three selling strategies: (1) traditional strategy – only offering traditional products, (2) green strategy – only offering smart green products, and (3) hybrid strategy – offering both traditional and smart green products.

Findings

The authors’ analysis shows that in the absence of data network effect, there will always be a conflict between profit maximization and environmental protection. However, a strategy that benefits both the firm and the environment exists when data network effect is present. Interestingly, hybrid and traditional strategies can be win-win strategies, but the green strategy cannot. Also surprisingly, the green strategy may harm the environment more as smart products become greener.

Originality/value

This study examines the economic and environmental implications of selling smart green products, and contributes to existing literature on sustainable operations and green product design by incorporating the impact of both consumer environmental awareness and data network effect. The authors’ findings shed light on how to coordinate the profitability and environmental impact of selling smart green products in the era of big data and IoT.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Ghaith M. Al-Abdallah and Majda I. Al-Salim

Green product innovation is a global industrial concern. This research examines the possible impact of green product innovation on firms' competitive advantage in…

Abstract

Purpose

Green product innovation is a global industrial concern. This research examines the possible impact of green product innovation on firms' competitive advantage in industrial enterprises operating in qualified industrial zones (QIZs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows a descriptive analytical methodology, testing two hypotheses formulated based on the reviewed literature among chemical industrial plants of the three Jordanian QIZs (Amman, Zarqa and Irbid) in Jordan. Following a preliminary scoping study of all 219 Jordanian chemical manufacturers, a quantitative five-point Likert scale questionnaire was administered to firms applying green product activities.

Findings

In total, 20 firms were found to be utilizing green product innovation, representing only 9.13% of the overall population. The hypothesis testing results indicated that green product innovation has a statistically significant positive impact on competitive advantage. The results also showed that the factor “firm resources” has a statistically significant positive moderation effect on the relationship between green product innovation and competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The vast majority of Jordanian chemical manufacturers were not implementing green innovation or practices; further study is needed to identify barriers. Findings are limited to managers of chemical industrial plants in Jordan, excluding the demand side (e.g. plant customers who purchase final products), which leaves a different research angle to be explored.

Originality/value

This is a pioneering study of green product innovation implications for firm competitive advantage in manufacturing enterprises, especially in QIZs of Jordan (which offer tax exemptions to foreign and local investors and sell products to regional and international markets).

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Manoshi Samaraweera, Jeanetta D. Sims and Dini M. Homsey

Would a green color label increase the dollar amount consumers are willing to pay for a green product? Would nature images (such as a leaf or flower) on the label have the…

Abstract

Purpose

Would a green color label increase the dollar amount consumers are willing to pay for a green product? Would nature images (such as a leaf or flower) on the label have the same effect? This paper aims to examine the role of these labeling strategies in influencing consumer willing to pay.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 2 × 3 experiment, the authors empirically test the research questions across two studies: in the controlled-lab setting with 160 students (Study 1) and in a field-setting with 268 consumers shopping at a grocery store (Study 2).

Findings

Results are consistent across both studies. Surprisingly, participants are willing to pay more for the product when it has a white-toned label rather than a green-toned one. Follow-up path analysis, with Study 2 data, reveals that a white-toned label has both an indirect (through more favorable evaluations of the product’s environmental friendliness), as well as a direct impact on willingness to pay. In providing a post hoc explanation, it is argued that a white-toned label better directs attention towards the claim signaling the product’s eco-friendliness, while providing a “clean”, “high-quality” look. In both studies however, nature images on the label did not have a significant effect.

Practical implications

Insights are particularly interesting for practitioners seeking to better label/package green products.

Originality/value

This investigation is the first to empirically examine how color and images on the label influence the dollar amount consumers are willing to pay for a green product. Findings reveal that counter to common belief, the heavy use of the color green on eco-friendly product labels might not be appropriate; a predominantly white-toned label works better.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Emine Kavas

In this research, the effect of green logistics in e-commerce on consumer purchasing behaviour is examined. Companies that have adopted green logistics are thought to be…

Abstract

In this research, the effect of green logistics in e-commerce on consumer purchasing behaviour is examined. Companies that have adopted green logistics are thought to be effective on consumer’s product preferences. Businesses are sensitive to changing environmental conditions and changing consumer behaviour and that they adopt green logistics in line with their development goals is a factor that can affect the purchasing behaviour of consumers. Therefore, ‘adoption of the green principle’ becomes a social and global phenomenon.

When consumers evaluate a product or service, they look at not only product performance and quality, but also the environmental impact of the product. The fact that the enterprises realised this, their responsibilities in terms of environmental impact, their achieving competitive advantage, and their aim to strengthen their brand image in the market led them to adopt the green principle. In this respect, the importance of R&D studies has been understood and activities related to this subject have increased. These activities ultimately reduced both living conditions and lifecycle costs. Green brand awareness has increased in consumers. The use of technology in commerce has expanded e-commerce and has become a part of life. In this context, it should be investigated whether the development of environmental consciousness of the consumer in e-commerce has an effect on the product selection. According to the findings of the research about the effect of green logistics practices on the buying behaviour of firms, it is determined that the environmental awareness and demands of the consumers are highly effective in the adoption of green logistics and that the green logistics practices in e-commerce affect the purchasing behaviour of the consumers. At this point, a green approach in national or international commercial activities has been exhibited and also needs to be executed.

Details

Global Street Economy and Micro Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-503-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2013

Margee Hume, Paul Johnston, Mark Argar and Craig Hume

Purpose – This chapter develops the case for a global Greenscape. It introduces the green global marketplace (Greenscape) to better understand the global green

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter develops the case for a global Greenscape. It introduces the green global marketplace (Greenscape) to better understand the global green market.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter introduces current green market practices and adopts case study methodology to present three distinct green cases related to renewable energy, process technology and wastewater recycling and their international market activities. The chapter offers discussion on findings and incorporates the novel technique of discourse analysis using Leximancer 3.0.Findings – The case shows how the Greendex Report (2012) positions Brazil, India, China and Russia at the top of the markets for green product penetration. The developed nations of USA, France and Canada make up the bottom rankings. The chapter finds essential elements for creating the global Greenscape and marketing of green technologies.Research limitations/implications (if applicable) – Empirical research testing success pathways and destination opportunities is desirable.Practical implications (if applicable) – The ‘success and failure criteria’ identify how planning, patent and partnerships are essential for successful entry. Specific market research on G(reen) markets, market information, marketing functions for market entry and market diffusion for renewable products and process technologies such as supply chain elements, and how these interrelate with achieving sustainability goals is essential for successful entry.Originality/value of chapter – The chapter offers a novel and original approach to international green market penetration and offers analysis related to the new world BRIC countries that have been little explored.

Details

International Business, Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-625-5

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Dwi Suhartanto, Ani Kartikasari, Raditha Hapsari, Bambang Setio Budianto, Mukhamad Najib and Yackob Astor

This study aims to assess young customers’ repurchasing intentions toward green plastic products by incorporating green trust model into green purchase intention model. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess young customers’ repurchasing intentions toward green plastic products by incorporating green trust model into green purchase intention model. It also evaluates the role of gender moderation in the green repurchase intention formation model.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 314 young consumers of green plastic products in Bandung, Indonesia were determined for this study. This study used variance-based partial least squares (PLS) to evaluate the proposed model and examine the hypothesized relationship, by means of SmartPLS 3. The construct validity and reliability were evaluated by testing the measurement model, while the proposed hypotheses were examined by testing the structural model.

Findings

The assessment of the proposed model using PLS reveals that the incorporation of green trust model increases the prediction strength of green repurchase intentions model on green plastic products. Further, this study shows that, in general, gender did not moderate the formation of green repurchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Besides broadening the green repurchase intention theory, this finding offers a direction for green plastic businesses to improve their capability and their marketing strategies. This study offers an important contribution in understanding young consumers’ intentions to buy green plastic products, although it has several drawbacks. In the future, to increase its generalization, this study can be replicated on young consumers in other developing and developed countries, and this model can also be tested in other segments.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there are no published studies that have tested the repurchase intention model for green plastic products, and none of the past studies have incorporated these models to explain repurchase intention toward green plastic products. Furthermore, the inclusion of gender roles in green repurchase intentions for green plastic products is important to be explored.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Nitika Sharma and Madan Lal

This study aims to presents the article regarding the influential role of moral inefficacy and moral disengagement to address green intention and behaviour gap among…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to presents the article regarding the influential role of moral inefficacy and moral disengagement to address green intention and behaviour gap among consumers, and how they attain self-exoneration because of the moral dilemma if any exist.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is based on semi-structured interviews, using constructivist grounded theory, which offers a platform to investigate, explore and discover psychosocial mechanism that operates among the consumers regarding the dimension of morality and green practices. In-depth exhaustive dialogues with Indian green consumers are set up to stimulate dialogue on the study.

Findings

Findings of the study shed light on the moral dilemma arising from internal and external inefficacy of consumers and disengagement of morality to save consumers from self-condemnation. Also, the study proffers the potential conceptual framework of moral inefficacy, moral disengagement and green buying behaviour of consumers. Eventually, the study mapped the morality matrix to explore the consequents of moral inefficacy and moral disengagement.

Research limitations/implications

The idiographic nature of qualitative research, particularly grounded theory may be considered as a research limitation as it follows limited generalizability. Moreover, the present research work is exploratory in nature and depends on the candour of researchers’ reactivity and understanding.

Practical implications

The study subjectively concludes the green behaviour of consumers and discusses the rationality behind green intentions and behaviour gap. Marketers can strategize consumer morality as an approach to enhance green buying behaviour of consumers by removing moral inefficacies and disengagements.

Social implications

It is crucial for marketers and society to understand the reasons behind non-green consumerism and accordingly cope up with the situation.

Originality/value

The study has been designed in a way to discuss the philosophy of morality and psychology of consumers on green consumption. To elicit the crux and conceptualization of morality and green purchasing framework using constructivist grounded theory is the exclusivity of this study. This paper explores green consumption pattern using moral orientation and processes in detail.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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