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1 – 10 of over 53000
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Stefano Bresciani, Shafique Ur Rehman, Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Khurram Ashfaq and Muhammad Usman

The organizations focus on environmental factors as stakeholders exert pressure to reduce the environmental influence arising from production tasks. This study aims to see…

Abstract

Purpose

The organizations focus on environmental factors as stakeholders exert pressure to reduce the environmental influence arising from production tasks. This study aims to see the influence of the environmental management control system (MCS) package and perceived environmental uncertainty on green performance with the mediating role of green dynamic capabilities in Pakistani manufacturing organizations. Moreover, this study aims to see the moderating role of investment in environmental management between green dynamic capabilities and green performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The partial least square structural equation modeling technique is used to test hypotheses. The data was collected through questionnaires using simple random sampling, and a total of 404 questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The data was collected from September 2021 to November 2021. Multiple regression analysis followed to see the influence of environmental MCS package, perceived environmental uncertainty, green dynamic capabilities and investment in environmental management on green performance.

Findings

Environmental MCS package, green dynamic capabilities and investment in environmental management are positively related to green performance. Despite this, perceived environmental uncertainty is negatively related to green performance. Moreover, green dynamic capabilities significantly mediate between environmental MCS package, perceived environmental uncertainty and green performance. Finally, investment in environmental management significantly moderates between green dynamic capabilities and green performance.

Practical implications

This research covers vital issues that how top management uses the environmental MCS package, perceived environmental uncertainty, green dynamic capabilities and investment in environmental management in determining green performance.

Originality/value

This research adds value to the existing literature by focusing on predictors that determine green performance. This pioneering study observes the influence of environmental MCS package and perceived environmental uncertainty on green performance and green dynamic capabilities as mediators by applying natural resource-based view theory. Moreover, investment in environmental management is used as a moderator between green dynamic capabilities and green performance. Finally, this study can benefit management, industrial policymakers and academicians.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2022

Jiawei Xu, Yubing Yu, Ye Wu, Justin Zuopeng Zhang, Yulong Liu, Yanhong Cao and Prajwal Eachempati

The paper aims to study the relationship between corporate social responsibility, green supply chain management, and operational performance and the moderating effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study the relationship between corporate social responsibility, green supply chain management, and operational performance and the moderating effects of relational capital on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct an empirical study with a structural equation modeling approach to investigate the relationship between corporate social responsibility—constructed by the quality and environmental responsibility, green supply chain management—including green supplier and customer management and operational performance—manifested by quality, cost, flexibility, and delivery performance using data from 308 manufacturers in China. Besides, the authors explore the moderating effect of supplier and customer relational capital on these relationships.

Findings

The findings indicate that a company's quality and environmental responsibility significantly impacts its green supply chain management practices, which further improve its operational performance in quality, cost, flexibility, and delivery. In addition, supplier and customer relational capital strengthens the influence of environmental responsibility on green supply chain management. While supplier relational capital reinforces the impact of green supplier management on flexibility and delivery performance, customer relational capital only strengthens the influence of green customer management on flexibility performance.

Originality/value

The study enriches the extant literature by developing a holistic framework integrating corporate social responsibility, green supply chain management, relational capital, and operational performance and unraveling their intricate relationships. The authors’ findings help practitioners prioritize proactive steps in environmental conservation more than achieving operational performance.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Mohammed Aboramadan and Osman M. Karatepe

This paper aims to propose a research model that explores perceived green organizational support (OS) as a mediator of the effect of green human resource management (GHRM…

2686

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a research model that explores perceived green organizational support (OS) as a mediator of the effect of green human resource management (GHRM) on job performance (JP) and organizational citizenship behavior toward the organization (OCB-O).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used data obtained from small- and medium-sized hotels in Palestine. The associations given above were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings reveal that GHRM boosts hotel employees’ perceptions of green OS. That is, the effective implementation of GHRM is a sign of perceived green OS. Congruent with the study predictions, employees’ perceptions of green OS activate their JP and OCB-O. Finally, perceived green OS mediates the impact of GHRM on JP and OCB-O.

Practical implications

Management should take advantage of green human resource practices to acquire and retain talented employees whose environmental goals and values fit those of the company. Employees should be involved in problem-solving on environmental sustainability and green management. They should also participate in continuous training programs and enhance their awareness of environmental sustainability and green management.

Originality/value

There is a lack of evidence appertaining to the effects of GHRM and perceived green OS on non-green positive workplace performance outcomes. More importantly, there is a scarcity of evidence about the mechanism linking GHRM to these performance outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Yi-Chun Huang, Elaine Quintana Borazon and Jen-Ming Liu

Environmental sustainability is one of the most pressing issues faced by the electric and electronics industry today. Industries are being challenged to incorporate…

1328

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental sustainability is one of the most pressing issues faced by the electric and electronics industry today. Industries are being challenged to incorporate environmental initiatives in their corporate strategies. Thus, this study aims to investigate the impact of stakeholder pressures (regulatory, internal and market) on green supply chain management and green corporate resources as well as their effects on the economic and environmental performance of Taiwan's electric and electronic industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 194 valid questionnaires were collected out of the 1,000 questionnaires distributed to Taiwan's electric and electronic product manufacturers. A structural equation modeling, using Amos 22.0, was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results of the analyses show that stakeholder pressure has a significant positive impact on corporate green resources and green supply chain management practices while green supply chain management practices have a significant and positive impact on organizational performance. Moreover, corporate green resources provide a mediation between organizational stakeholder pressure and green supply chain management.

Practical implications

The results may be of value and interest to supply chain managers and policymakers on the push factors for implementing green supply chain management practices and their consequences.

Originality/value

This paper shows the complementarity of stakeholder and resource-based theories in influencing organizational performance in the electric and electronic industry in the context of sustainable development. This also enhances the understanding of the antecedents and consequences of green supply chain management and provides robust findings on the relationship between environmental and economic performance.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Lai Wan Hooi, Min-Shi Liu and Joe J.J. Lin

Drawing on the Ability–Motivation–Opportunity (AMO) theory, this study aims to test the effect of green human resource management (G-HRM) on green organizational…

1297

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the Ability–Motivation–Opportunity (AMO) theory, this study aims to test the effect of green human resource management (G-HRM) on green organizational citizenship behavior (G-OCB) taking into consideration green culture as the mediator and green values as the moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

Valid data from 240 entities collected in Taiwan were analyzed to test the five hypotheses. The valid data were analyzed using confirmatory factor model, correlation analysis, structural equation modeling and bootstrapping analysis.

Findings

The results for all relationships show significant associations. G-HRM is significantly associated with G-OCB and green culture, while green culture is significantly related to G-OCB. The mediating effect of green culture on the G-HRM-G-OCB relationship is significant. The moderating effect of green values on the green culture–G-OCB relationship is significant.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in being one of the first study in an advanced emerging economy utilizing the AMO theory.

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Ebenezer Afum, Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Abigail Opoku Mensah, Enoch Mensah-Williams, Charles Baah and Essel Dacosta

This paper investigates the combined effect of internal environmental management (IEM) and green human resource management (GHRM) on corporate reputation (CR)…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the combined effect of internal environmental management (IEM) and green human resource management (GHRM) on corporate reputation (CR), environmental performance (EP) and financial performance (FP). The paper further explores the indirect effects of CR and EP between the direct paths.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are garnered from 164 firms from three industries in Ghana. Partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) is the methodological technique used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The result demonstrates that unlike IEM which has a significant effect on FP when implemented in isolation, GHRM does not have a significant effect on FP. However, the joint implementation of IEM and GHRM can provide better results in terms of improved CR, enhanced EP and significant FP improvement. CR and EP were further found to mediate the relationship between the direct paths.

Practical implications

The results suggest that the joint implementation of IEM and GHRM is critical for firms that seek to enjoy superior reputation, enhance their environmental sustainability and achieve financial gains. Consequently, managers are strongly encouraged to create a sustainable and vibrant company via significant and rational investment in green initiatives like IEM and GHRM.

Originality/value

This study happens to be one of the first to develop a research model that investigates the joint effect of IEM and GHRM within the context of CR, environmental sustainability and FP.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of the under-researched developing country of Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper qualitatively explores the Thai education and skill-formation system and conducts a cross-case analysis of four firms across different industries in Thailand. The empirical findings in this paper draws on semi-structured interviews with various stakeholders; field visits to vocational colleges, universities, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) and firms across industries both in Bangkok and in other provinces in Thailand; and a review of archival documents and web-based reports and resources.

Findings

This paper proposes that firms across industries in Thailand must be responsible for helping their employees/workers obtain the green knowledge and skills necessary to perform green jobs through high-road human resource (HR) practices in response to the fact that the Thai education and skill-formation system is unlikely to produce a sufficient number of employees/workers who have green knowledge, skills and abilities and are industry-ready to perform green jobs, leading to a shortage of employees/workers who possess green skills in the labor market. Specifically, curricula in vocational colleges and universities in Thailand are not likely to respond to the needs of firms in producing those employees/workers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research concern its methodology. This research is based on the qualitative studies of the Thai education and skill-formation system and a case study of firms across industries in Thailand. Thus, this paper does not aim to generalize the findings to all other countries but to enrich the discussion on the effects of macro-level HR policies on the creation of green jobs and the development of green skills across firms in each country. Additionally, it is difficult to gain access to firms across several industries and various stakeholders to understand the development of green skills among employees in these firms. The reasons are resource constraints, time constraints and the hesitation of firms in permitting the author to access the data. These difficulties have restricted the sources of information to construct a more nuanced picture of firms across various industries in developing green skills among their existing employees. Consequently, this research does not include firms in several other industries, including the pulp and paper industry, textile and garment industry, plastic industry and agri-food industry. Thus, future research may extend the topic of the development of green skills among employees to these industries. Quantitative studies using large samples of firms across industries may also be useful in deepening the understanding of this topic, which is significant from the perspectives of the strategic human resource management (SHRM), comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and green economy.

Practical implications

This paper also provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand, other developing countries and other emerging market economies with deficiencies in the national education and skill-formation system. First, the top managers and/or HR managers can apply various methods to internally develop managers and employees/workers with the appropriate environmental/green knowledge and necessary skills to perform green jobs. The methods include classroom training, on-the-job training, coaching, mentoring systems, job shadowing and being role models for younger generations of employees. Second, these top managers and/or HR managers can cooperate with vocational colleges and/or universities in their countries to design educational programs/curricula related to environmental/green management to be able to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for their firms. These managers can request for assistance from universities in their countries when their firms confront sophisticated questions/problems related to environmental/green management. In this regard, universities will have an opportunity to solve real environmental/green problems experienced by industries, while firms can appropriately and accurately solve environmental/green questions/problems. Third, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their firms to apply for certificates of green-/environmentally friendly products or carbon footprint labels from NGOs to foster a green image among firms' consumers. These applications require the firms to pay special attention to the cultivation of green awareness and the development of green skills among their employees. Fourth, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their employees to express green-/environmentally friendly behaviors as well as sufficiency-based consumption behaviors. In fact, these top managers and/or HR managers can foster their employees to reduce energy consumption, including electricity and water, to conserve these types of energy for young generations. Fifth, these top managers and/or HR managers can adopt and implement green human resource management (GHRM) practices consisting of green recruitment and selection, green training and development, green performance management, green pay and rewards and green employee relations in their firms to upgrade both the environmental and social performances of firms. Finally, these top managers and/or HR managers must take serious actions regarding the implementation of environmental/green management policies and practices within their firms in order to facilitate the movement of the country toward the bioeconomy, circular economy, and green economy (BCG economy).

Social implications

This paper provides social/policy implications for the government, vocational colleges and universities in Thailand, other developing countries and emerging market economies where the skill shortage problem is still severe. First, the government of each country should incorporate green/environmental policies into the national education policy and the long-term strategic plan of the country. Second, the government should continuously implement such national policy and strategic plan by encouraging government agencies, vocational colleges, universities, firms and NGOs to cooperate in developing and offering environmental/green management educational programs/curricula to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for those firms. Third, the government should encourage vocational colleges and universities to equip their students with green skills to be industry-ready in a real working context. Fourth, to alleviate the skill shortage problem in the labor market, the government should foster firms, especially private sector firms, to focus on the upskilling and reskilling of their existing employees. With this action, their existing employees will have green skills, be able to effectively perform green jobs and become an important driver to help the country move toward the BCG economy. Fifth, the government of each country should encourage firms to develop green-/environmentally friendly products by offering them various types of incentives, including tax reductions or tax exemptions. Sixth, the government should encourage universities in the country to sign a memorandum of understanding with leading research institutes and world-class digital technology companies such that these institutes and/or companies admit high-potential university students to work as trainees/entry-level employees for a certain duration. This action can ultimately facilitate knowledge transfer from these institutes and/or companies to those university students who will finally return to work in their home country. Seventh, the government, especially the Ministry of Education, should encourage vocational colleges and universities to teach students in the environmental/green management program based on real case studies/problems found across firms. In this way, graduates should be industry-ready to perform green jobs. Finally, the government must pay serious attention to the implementation of environmental/green management policies across levels within the country so that the transition of the country toward the BCG economy will finally come true in the future.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the SHRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and the literature on the green economy and the development of green skills in firms in the following ways. First, this paper focuses on examining how the institutional context of Thailand shapes the development of green knowledge and skills among employees across firms in Thailand. In this regard, the paper aims to fill the gap in the literature on strategic HRM and comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices as proposed by Batt and Banerjee (2012) and Batt and Hermans (2012), who suggested that the literature on strategic HRM should go beyond the organizational context and examine how firms adopt and implement HR practices in response to the national institutional context. Second, the paper aims to extend the literature on the green economy regarding the roles played by institutional factors in shaping the development of green knowledge and skills across firms. Finally, strategic HRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices and green economy studies have overlooked the under-researched country of Thailand. Most studies in these three areas focus more on developed countries. Thus, the findings of this paper should extend the literature on those areas regarding the development of green skills among employees across firms in response to the Thai institutional context.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Mohammed Aboramadan, Yasir Mansoor Kundi and Annika Becker

Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management

1198

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management (GHRM) on nonprofit employees' green work-related outcomes, namely green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. In the model, perceived green organizational support (PGOS) is theorized and employed as an intervening mechanism between the examined linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two different waves from 408 employees working in the Palestinian nonprofit sector. Covariance based-structural equation modeling was used to validate the study's research model and to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that GHRM is positively associated with green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. Moreover, the results show that PGOS exhibits a significant mediation effect between the aforesaid links. This study thus provides initial empirical evidence in the field of GHRM, with particular focus on the nonprofit sector.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides a roadmap to nonprofit managers and practitioners on how GHRM can encourage employees to speak up, share information and help others in the environmental and green domain. By supporting nonprofit managers strengthening green employee behavior, it provides an additional source to fostering intrinsically motivated behaviors in the workplace.

Originality/value

In response to urgent environmental threats, this study contributes to green and sustainable management research with a focus on GHRM, thereby providing initial empirical research from a nonprofit perspective.

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Kenneth W. Green, R. Anthony Inman, Victor E. Sower and Pamela J. Zelbst

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the complementary impact of JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices on environmental performance.

5865

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the complementary impact of JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices on environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a sample of 225 US manufacturing managers are analyzed using a PLS-SEM methodology.

Findings

JIT and TQM are directly and positively associated with green supply chain management practices. JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices are complementary in that combined they provide a greater impact on environmental performance than if implemented individually.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is limited to US manufacturing managers, with a low response rate.

Practical implications

Successful implementations of JIT and TQM improvement programs support the implementation of green supply chain management practices leading to improved environmental performance.

Social implications

The combination of JIT, TQM and green manufacturing practices improves the environment by eliminating all forms of waste and providing customers with eco-friendly products and services.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to empirically assess the complementary impact of JIT, TQM and green supply chain practices within the context of environmental sustainability.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Shwu-Ing Wu and Yu-Chen Wu

This study applied the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine the awareness of green management among executives in the Top 5000 corporations (as listed in the China…

2352

Abstract

Purpose

This study applied the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to examine the awareness of green management among executives in the Top 5000 corporations (as listed in the China Credit Information Service (CCIS)). Perceived risk, perceived benefit, justice, moral obligation, control force, and control beliefs were considered antecedents to the three components of the TPB (attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavior control, PBC). The correlation between intention and implementation of green management strategies was examined, as was the combined influence of these two factors on organizational performance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

333 valid questionnaires were returned from a sample of the Top 5000 corporations listed in the CCIS. Structural equation modelling was used to verify the causal relationship amongst the green management variables and performance perspectives.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived risk and perceived benefit have a strong correspondence to the expressed attitudes related to green management strategies; justice and moral obligation are correlated with the subjective norm; control force and control belief are correlated with perceived behavior control (PBC). Working in conjunction, the three components of the TPB exert a strong influence on the intentions of managers and their likelihood of implementing green management strategies. These factors further affect organizational performance.

Practical implications

When corporations in the service industry are compared with those in the manufacturing industry, the following five paths show significant differences: control force to PBC, control belief to PBC, attitude to strategic intention, subjective norm to strategic intention, and PBC to strategic intention. These results demonstrate that different industry clusters may lead to different path strengths as a corporation adopts green management strategies.

Originality/value

This study used the TPB to explore green management adoption and was able to clarify the relationship between green management strategies and organizational performance. It is hoped that this study might provide academic as well as practical value.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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