Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Jirapol Jirakraisiri, Yuosre F. Badir and Björn Frank

Many firms struggle to implement strategies that can successfully enhance the environmental sustainability of their processes. Drawing on the theories of green intellectual

Abstract

Purpose

Many firms struggle to implement strategies that can successfully enhance the environmental sustainability of their processes. Drawing on the theories of green intellectual capital and complementary assets, this study develops a model describing the mechanism whereby firms can translate a green (i.e., environmental) strategy into a superior green process innovation performance (GPIP).

Design/methodology/approach

Regression analysis of multi-source survey data collected from 514 managers at 257 firms (257 top management members and 257 safety or environmental managers) was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

A firm's green strategic intent has positive effects on the three aspects of green intellectual capital (i.e., human, organizational and relational capital). In turn, these three aspects have positive effects on GPIP. Moreover, green organizational capital positively moderates the effect of green relational capital on GPIP, whereas it negatively moderates the effect of human capital on GPIP.

Research limitations/implications

In order to implement a green strategy successfully, especially in polluted industries such as the chemical industry, managers need to develop not only the firm's tangible resources but also its intangible resources. The more they invest in green organizational capital, the higher the level of GPIP that can be achieved. On average, a firm's green human capital is more important than its organizational and relational capital. Moreover, its organizational capital helps capture the benefits of its relational capital, but it impairs the creativity of its human capital.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the literature on green strategy implementation by suggesting that green intellectual capital plays a mediating role in the relationship between a firm's green strategic intent and GPIP.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Ching‐Hsun Chang and Yu‐Shan Chen

This study aims to develop an original framework of green intellectual capital to explore the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on green intellectual

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop an original framework of green intellectual capital to explore the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on green intellectual capital through the partial mediator ‐ environmental consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study summarizes the concepts of CSR and green management to develop an integral framework to enhance green intellectual capital. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to verify the research framework.

Findings

This study utilizes SEM to explore the influences of CSR and environmental consciousness on three types of green intellectual capitalgreen human capital, green structural capital, and green relationship capital. The empirical results of this study demonstrate that CSR and environmental consciousness have positive effects on three types of green intellectual capital. Besides, this study verifies that environmental consciousness is a partial mediator between CSR and three types of green intellectual capital. In addition, this study classifies the Taiwanese manufacturing companies into three groups – highly, medially, and lowly ethic companies. The results show that three types of green intellectual capital of highly ethic companies are the most, and those of medially ethic companies are the next, while those of lowly ethic companies are the least.

Originality/value

This study integrates the theories of CSR and green management to develop an integral conceptual model of green intellectual capital to explore its managerial implications and determinants.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Cheng‐Li Huang and Fan‐Hua Kung

This study aims to discuss the impact that environmental consciousness and green intellectual capital had on competitive advantage. The study adopted green intellectual

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss the impact that environmental consciousness and green intellectual capital had on competitive advantage. The study adopted green intellectual capital as an intervening variable to gain insight into how environmental consciousness indirectly affects competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey on the environmental consciousness and intellectual capital management of Taiwan's manufacturing firms was conducted, and 227 samples were analyzed. The research model investigates the relevant relationships among the constructs by using a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

Research results reveal that environmental consciousness had an indirect impact on competitive advantage through investment in green intellectual capital. It was thus known that green intellectual capital is a mediator of the relationship between environmental consciousness and competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This paper may serve as a reference for firms mapping out future environmental policies and provide an input of various perspectives and arguments into the discipline of green management.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Aarif Mohd Sheikh

The term “social innovation” refers to interorganizational activity ostensibly designed to address environmental issues. Green intellectual capital (IC) has been…

Abstract

Purpose

The term “social innovation” refers to interorganizational activity ostensibly designed to address environmental issues. Green intellectual capital (IC) has been considered to be a vitally important mechanism for companies to move towards green production. By adopting the Intellectual capital-based view (ICV) as the underpinning theory, this study aims to investigate the green intellectual capital and social innovation tie-up.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was adopted in this study. The mail survey was used to collect data from managers of 509 manufacturing units operating in J&K, India. The study model was tested using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

Based on the SEM results, the key factors that significantly influence social innovation were green human capital and green structural capital. The results also posited that green relational capital was not significantly related to social innovation.

Originality/value

As revealed by the existing literature, no similar work has been done yet. Therefore, this study's originality lies in its exploration of green intellectual capital (IC) and social innovation interplay in an environmentally sensitive sector, manufacturing. Besides, this study offers insights to academics and practitioners in the manufacturing sector, especially in emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Waheed Ali, Jun Wen, Hadi Hussain, Nadeem Akhtar Khan, Muhammad Waleed Younas and Ihsan Jamil

In the era of knowledge economy, the significance of intellectual capital has been increasing globally. Similarly, recent studies have focused on the importance of green

Abstract

Purpose

In the era of knowledge economy, the significance of intellectual capital has been increasing globally. Similarly, recent studies have focused on the importance of green intellectual capital in mitigating environmental degradation. However, only a few studies have analysed green intellectual capital and its impacts in the specific case of Pakistan. Hence, this study aims to investigate the effects of green intellectual capital on green innovation adoption in Pakistan’s manufacturing small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

We used a data sample of 235 SMEs, gathered from the four manufacturing sectors of Pakistan including: textile, chemical, pharmaceutical and steel and analysed using a multiple regression analysis approach.

Findings

The empirical results of this research indicate that green human capital and green structural capital significantly increase green innovation adoption. However, it must be noted that green relational capital has a positive but insignificant impact on green innovation adoption in manufacturing SMEs in Pakistan.

Originality/value

The findings and recommended policy measures of this study are important for the managers of manufacturing SMEs and policymakers to mitigate environmental destruction and achieve sustainable development through green intellectual capital.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Jing Yi Yong, M.-Y. Yusliza, Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour and Noor Hazlina Ahmad

Green human resource management (HRM) has been considered to be a vitally important mechanism for companies to move towards a sustainable organization. By adopting the…

Abstract

Purpose

Green human resource management (HRM) has been considered to be a vitally important mechanism for companies to move towards a sustainable organization. By adopting the Ability-Motivation-Opportunity as the underpinning theory, the purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that facilitate the adoption of Green HRM in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory approach research was adopted in this study. The required data for this study were collected using semi-structured face-to-face interviews with human resources directors and managers from four large manufacturing companies in Malaysia. The data collected was then reorganized into four themes.

Findings

Based on the interview, four key factors that influence the adoption of Green HRM include stakeholder pressures, relative advantage, which means the perceived benefits from implementing Green HRM, top management commitment and green intellectual capital, which means the intellectual capital incorporating green innovation or environmental management. Surprisingly, among the three dimensions of green intellectual capital, only green human capital and green structural capital were greatly discussed by the human resources directors and managers, while the role of green relational capital on the adoption of Green HRM was hardly observed.

Originality/value

Research studies on Green HRM in Malaysia are scarce. The originality of this paper lies in its exploration of Green HRM in an environmental sensitive sector and the insight it provides to academics and practitioners involved in the manufacturing sector. Although research findings cannot be generalized, they can be used as insights for both academics and end-users in emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Javier Amores-Salvadó, Jorge Cruz-González, Miriam Delgado-Verde and Jaime González-Masip

This paper investigates the impact of green technological distance (GTD) – environmental technological knowledge distance between the firm and the industry – on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the impact of green technological distance (GTD) – environmental technological knowledge distance between the firm and the industry – on the adoption of proactive and reactive environmental strategies and whether this relationship is moderated by different manifestations of green structural capital, i.e. environmental incentives, senior environmental responsibilities and external environmental communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is conducted on a sample of 202 manufacturing companies from Spain. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the moderating effect of green structural capital.

Findings

Results show that the role of green structural capital as guiding factor of the environmental response of the firm and organizational support to cope with the GTD between the firm and the industry is diverse and depends on the manifestation of green structural capital under analysis. The establishment of environmental incentives for managers and the presence of environmental information in the firm's external communications – as two expressions of green structural capital – show a different behavior when facing the environmental technological challenge, supporting environmental reactive and proactive strategies respectively. In addition, GTD increases the adoption of reactive environmental strategies, while it has no direct effect on the implementation of proactive environmental practices.

Originality/value

Using the novel construct of GTD and the analysis of a so far unstudied interaction, the study contributes to the literature on intellectual capital and environmental strategy considering the technical change associated to the environmental challenge. In so doing, it improves the understanding of the role of green structural capital as a guiding factor of the environmental response of the firm and organizational support to cope with the GTD between the firm and the industry.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Adil Mansoor, Sarwat Jahan and Madiha Riaz

Drawing upon the intellectual capital-based view theory, this study explored the relationship between green intellectual capital (IC) and environmental performance (EP…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the intellectual capital-based view theory, this study explored the relationship between green intellectual capital (IC) and environmental performance (EP) with the intervening effect of green human resource management (GHRM).

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected from 187 human resource directors/managers working in manufacturing firms of Pakistan. A partial least squares approach was applied to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results showed a mediating effect of GHRM on the relationship between green human capital and the organizational EP. Also two dimensions of green IC (green human capital, green relational capital) were also found positively related to the EP of the firm.

Practical implications

Policymakers should devote their attention to the preservation and enhancement of their employees' knowledge as green human capital is possessed by the employees. Furthermore, managers must exchange information with key stakeholders to better understand and resolve their environmental concerns. Organizational leaders must also ensure the implementation of GHRM policies that, in turn, improve the EP with the aid of green IC.

Originality/value

The current research contributes to the literature by defining green IC as an antecedent and GHRM as an intervening variable for EP. In addition, this study underlines the significance of GHC as a valuable intangible asset for the achievement of environmental sustainability. It also illustrates the importance of GRC, which creates an exchange partnership with the stakeholders to promote corporate environmentalism.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

M.R. Baharum and M. Pitt

The purpose of this paper is to consider how a facilities management (FM) organisation can strategically manage its intellectual capital with regard to environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how a facilities management (FM) organisation can strategically manage its intellectual capital with regard to environmental management services and to suggest a conceptual strategy for determining FM intangible assets' competitiveness and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a literature review of published work within the industry in relation to environmental issues and FM knowledge management, forming a basis for a further research paradigm.

Findings

Building on the resource‐based view of the FM organisation, the FM intellectual capital framework is referred to emphasize the significance of green strategy in its knowledge components.

Research limitations/implications

This paper emphasizes the importance of FM intellectual capital in achieving overall sustainability and profitability to an organisation. However, due to limitations of experience within the FM knowledge perspective, it will take a while before significant results can be provided in proof of this.

Practical implications

This paper establishes an imperative approach about FM knowledge capital capability to drive a greater environmental effectiveness and to reduce liability from a pertinent environmental directive.

Originality/value

This paper theoretically evaluates the importance of FM intangible assets to the development of environmental management by an FM firm.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Elisabeth Albertini

Environmental capabilities, allowing companies to carry out their productive activities in ways that limit damage to natural environment, are at the heart of the fourth…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental capabilities, allowing companies to carry out their productive activities in ways that limit damage to natural environment, are at the heart of the fourth stage of research in intellectual capital. Accordingly, the purpose of this research is to explore firm's current environmental capabilities, disclosed by managers through corporate messages, that participate to the development of sustainable intellectual capital (SIC).

Design/methodology/approach

With this in mind, we first conducted a lexical content analysis followed by a thematic content analysis of 241 letters to shareholders from the CEOs of major European companies published in 2016.

Findings

The lexical content analysis reveals that managers of major European companies have developed green alliances to address the energy transition challenge by modifying their manufacturing processes. The thematic content analysis of the CEOs discourse highlights that managerial competencies, continuous innovation and stakeholder integration are key environmental capabilities that matter to CEOs.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the fourth stage of research on IC highlighting the environmental capabilities and resources that are disclosed by companies in their corporate communication. Our results enhance the understanding on how environmental capabilities and resources enhance the human, organizational, technological and relational sustainable intellectual capital.

Practical implications

This research highlights the importance of green alliances that allow companies to address the challenge of the ecological transition. In this context, the continuous innovation capability seems to be a fruitful way of gaining competitive advantage in this challenge.

Originality/value

This paper provides a detailed description of the environmental capabilities that participate to the development of the human, technological and relational SIC.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000