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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Daniel Nyberg, Christopher Wright and Jacqueline Kirk

While the use of the pragmatic sociology of critique has enjoyed increasing academic popularity, the relationship between justification and broader power relations remains…

Abstract

While the use of the pragmatic sociology of critique has enjoyed increasing academic popularity, the relationship between justification and broader power relations remains unclear. Recent attention to the concept of ‘domination’ suggests the need for a greater focus on how employed public goods reinforce prevailing social arrangements. In this article we explore the public debate over the expansion of hydraulic fracturing of shale gas (so-called ‘fracking’) in the United Kingdom (UK). This technology has generated significant debate and controversy. Through a detailed examination of public inquiries into the technology we explore how different actors employ discursive strategies to justify their claims for the expansion or rejection of fracking. Through this analysis, the article identifies how some of these justifications enjoy precedence over others within the prevailing neoliberal political regime. By explaining how such a political regime is constituted, our study contributes to better understanding how different justifications support hegemonic political ideologies.

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Justification, Evaluation and Critique in the Study of Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-379-1

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Asit Aich and Sadhan Kumar Ghosh

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the green energy generation potential of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) through anaerobic digestion (AD…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the green energy generation potential of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) through anaerobic digestion (AD) route in India and its benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, performances of some AD plants presently operating successfully in India have been studied in the field (Section 3.1). Primary data collected from this study has been used to evaluate the biogas generation potential of OFMSW in Indian condition (Section 4). To ensure the validity, this gas generation potential has been compared with the gas yield data observed by the other researchers and with the gas yields of AD plants of some technology providers at some parts of the world (Section 4.1). From the future population projection (year 2030) and the future per capita waste generation rate obtained from the literature survey, estimation has been made for future quantity of municipal solid waste (MSW) (year 2030) (Section 2.3). Based on these data, the green energy generation potential from the bio-degradable portion of MSW through AD route, in India, has been evaluated (Section 4.2), and its economic and environmental benefits have been analyzed (Section 5) .

Findings

This secondary research work reveals that from the bio-degradable portion of MSW, India can generate about 583 MW of green energy daily and produce about 5.1 mil MT of bio fertilizer per annum presently, and these may go up to 2,273 MW and 19.5 mil MT, respectively, in the year 2030. Generation of green energy from OFMSW, in India, may save coal consumption of about 3.04 mil MT and reduce 35.42 mil MT of CO2 emissions per annum presently. Moreover, utilization of the bio-degradable portion of the MSW stream may save about 550 acres (2.23 sq. km) of landfill area per year presently and in total may save about 8,182 hectare (82.5 sq. km) of landfill area during the period of 15 years time.

Research limitations/implications

The population growth and future per capita waste generation rate are based on census report of Govt of India and survey report of World Bank, respectively. Separate collection of bio-degradable portion of MSW has not yet been developed properly in India.

Practical implications

This study reveals that in India, the high-moisture-content, low-calorific-value bio-degradable waste in India can be used for the generation of substantial amount of green energy in India, which in addition to financial gains would reduce the waste quantity at landfill site, conserve natural resources, save land, reduce green house gas emission, generate employment and help to protect environment. Considering these benefits and advantages, evaluated in this study, policy makers and city managers may review their approaches toward solid waste management system of their cities to meet the challenges of huge increase of MSW in the years to come in India. More research works may be initiated to improve the AD system of organic waste, and more capital may be employed in waste management business in India.

Originality/value

Numbers of research works have been carried out by other researchers for estimation of energy generation potential through AD of OFMSW for different countries; but no such work could be found to identify such potential and its benefits in India. This research work demonstrates how MSW can be used as a wealth for green energy production in India. The originality of this paper is the analysis of green energy generation potential from the low calorific value MSW in India.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Wadu Mesthrige Jayantha and Wan Sze Man

It is known that people's expectation towards their living “green” is increasing. Green features are now regarded as one of the important considerations of buyers in…

Abstract

Purpose

It is known that people's expectation towards their living “green” is increasing. Green features are now regarded as one of the important considerations of buyers in purchasing a property. This research paper aims to investigate the significance of the green features of residential buildings to property buyers.

Design/methodology/approach

HK‐BEAM certification and HK‐GBC Award are used as the measurement of green residential buildings. The study used a hedonic price model to determine whether there is a relationship between green features and residential property price and the influence of green features on the residential property price if there is such relationship.

Findings

The empirical results show that green features have a significant and positive relationship with residential property price. People are willing to pay more for green buildings recognized by HK‐BEAM and HK‐GBC. They are willing to pay a sale price premium ranging from 3.4 percent to 6.4 percent. Furthermore, a relatively larger premium is found in Hong Kong Island compared to the New Territories.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that environmentally friendly green buildings both increase the value of a property and attract property buyers; and well‐recognized green building schemes add value to properties and hence increase the property price.

Originality/value

The study has contributed an indication of the amount a buyer would be willing to pay for quality green buildings as a reference for users, developers and investors. The study sheds light on the ability of the market to capitalize environmental considerations in investment decisions.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

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Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Masa Noguchi

Homes need to be socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable in response to societal pressure on our common future. The concept of ‘Sustainable Development…

Abstract

Homes need to be socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable in response to societal pressure on our common future. The concept of ‘Sustainable Development’ was first advocated by the World Commission on Environment and Development, dated back to 1987, and it was considered as ‘a process of change in which the exploitation of resources, the direction of investments, the orientation of technological development, and institutional change are all in harmony and enhance both current and future potential to meet needs and aspirations.’ In 1992, this notion was given additional impetus at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (or the Earth Summit) held in Rio de Janeiro where an initial international treaty on environment was produced; however, this had neither limits on green house gas emissions nor legal enforcement provisions for individual nations. In 1997, the text of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change was adopted eventually at the 3rd Conference of the Parties held in Kyoto, Japan. As of April 2008, 178 states signed and ratified the Protocol; in consequence, most industrialized nations and some central European countries agreed to legally binding the reductions of greenhouse gas emissions of an average of 6 to 8% below 1990 levels between the years 2008 and 2012.

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Open House International, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Edward H. Ziegler

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate significant problems in the US' development pattern of regional automobile‐dependent sprawl and local growth management and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate significant problems in the US' development pattern of regional automobile‐dependent sprawl and local growth management and to make suggestions about adopting a regional growth management model that might better provide for more sustainable development of the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews trends in the USA and elsewhere to determine the negative effects of the current system of sprawl and the potential benefits of developing higher‐density urban centers. The paper also looks to models in some US cities and Europe to further analyze potential legal and political issues related to this type of regional sustainable development.

Findings

Unsustainable, automobile‐dependent regional sprawl is a result of local zoning, growth management, and parking programs and has negative effects both now and for the future. The result has been more time, money, and resources wasted in automobile transit instead of new planning models that would lead to a more sustainable and less automobile‐dependent future.

Practical implications

A metropolitan sustainable development governing framework for growth management in the twenty‐first century is essential for a sustainable future. This includes higher‐density urban centers, transit‐oriented development centers, and a change in public attitude away from “not in my back yard” thinking.

Originality/value

This paper provides the potential benefits of creating a metropolitan governing framework to identify and regulate “growth areas” in a region. It further demonstrates how linking these areas to regional transit planning will help achieve the development of higher‐density, mixed use, and intensive urban core job/housing areas where people could live, work, shop, and play without the use of the automobile.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Kieran Mulholland

– The following editorial aims to highlight the potential impact that efficient facilities management with regards to agricultural ventilation systems could have in hot climates.

Abstract

Purpose

The following editorial aims to highlight the potential impact that efficient facilities management with regards to agricultural ventilation systems could have in hot climates.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the literature surrounding different ventilation systems and their benefits and disadvantages on milk production, evidence to support the aims was compiled. Through looking at the direct effects on milk yield and how these values vary across the globe a scope of the potential effect of better facilities management was created.

Findings

This paper found that although more expensive to install and power mechanical ventilation provided many benefits to animal welfare and productivity. However, in contrast developing countries were relying upon more traditional methods such as natural ventilation, which have limitations in tropical climates. By using India as a case study the potential benefits of improving productivity on the emissions of green house gases was illustrated.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in this editorial are limited by the quality and amount of literature currently published regarding ventilation methods in many developing nations such as India.

Practical implications

Practically it is a complex process to quantify the processes involved in milk production. Therefore, the data referenced in this editorial is subject to vary across the globe with contrasting farming techniques and livestock breeds.

Originality/value

This paper brings an original view on how better management of ventilation systems; most noticeably within developing nations with hot climates could potential produce large benefits. Through increased productivity within the world's largest milk producers the green house gas emissions from agriculture can be reduced.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Saleh Fahed Alkhatib and Yazan Khalid Abed-Allah Migdadi

This study aims to evaluate and rank green airlines by proposing a novel approach that integrates different multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate and rank green airlines by proposing a novel approach that integrates different multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

Three MCDM techniques were adopted: Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) addressed the impact relationships between Airline Green Operations (AGOs) and classified them into cause and effect; analytical hierarchy process (AHP) prioritized these actions and found their global and local weights; and Techniques to Order Preferences by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) used the weighted actions to evaluate and rank 20 green airlines as a case study.

Findings

DEMATEL outcomes provide the first AGOs impact relationships map (IRM), classify AGOs into cause and effect actions and provide better understanding how these green operations affect each other. According to the AHP outcomes, “GHG1and fuel” and “GHG2 and Energy” were the most important set of actions, respectively. Finally, a new evaluation and ranking for 20 green airlines has been presented.

Practical implications

The AGOs IRM provides a better understanding of the airline green operations and how they affect each other. The new evaluation and ranking technique helps airlines to identify their green strength and weakness areas and supports their sustainability processes.

Originality/value

The increasing importance of AGOs evaluation and analysis highlights the importance of green airlines studies like this one. This study analyzed AGOs, their impact relationships, developed their IRM and provided a new worldwide green airline benchmarking base.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2018

Hao-Cheng Huang and Yeng-Horng Perng

Commercial space features essential characteristics of attracting clients and creating profits; thus, the exterior and interior designs of conventional commercial space…

Abstract

Commercial space features essential characteristics of attracting clients and creating profits; thus, the exterior and interior designs of conventional commercial space were often made to look grandiose and overdecorated. Over time, according to commercial attributes, operator preferences, and style of the designer, commercial spaces have constantly undergone renovation into varied styles. However, the physical renovation processhas caused multiple and composite types of environmental pollution, such as waste and noise pollution caused by breaking of walls or partitions, anddecorative paint pollution, as well as the use of high-energy-consuming lighting equipment, air-conditioning systems, and decorative materials. Global pollution has caused climate change, endangering living organismsand human life. Furthermore, no effective method exists to control the problem of high greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, this study used energy-saving design concerns of a garden-type commercial space to propose an energy-saving evaluation model. The study combined three methodologies, the Delphi method, analytic hierarchy process, and fuzzy logic theory, to construct a multi-criteria decision support system for designing green commercial spaces, and used the green spatial design of a garden café as an example to illustrate the high objectivity and adaptability of the proposed model in practical application. The study also used an international award-winning case to validate that the proposed model had practical value as a reference to support key design decisions.

Details

Open House International, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2012

Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz and George Ofori

From interviews with selected experts and secondary sources, this paper charts the actions that led to Malaysia having its own green building rating tool. It began with…

Abstract

From interviews with selected experts and secondary sources, this paper charts the actions that led to Malaysia having its own green building rating tool. It began with the Institution of Architects Malaysia and the Institution of Engineers Malaysia working together in 2008 to come up with the Green Building Index (GBI) specifically suited for the Malaysian condition. The index was launched a year later, the same year that a new prime minister came into office. With greening the economy in mind, he launched a few major initiatives, one of which was the creation of the Ministry of Energy, Green Technology and Water to replace the Ministry of Energy, Water and Communications and another was the launching of the National Technology Policy. In December 2009, he made the commitment on Malaysia's behalf to reduce carbon dioxide emission at the Copenhagen Summit, thereby cementing his commitment to green issues at the international level. Behind-the-scene lobbying by the private sector resulted in the government explicitly endorsing the GBI by tying GBI certification of buildings to financial incentives. This paper makes the case that the strong cooperation between the private sector and the government over the GBI represents a form of public-private partnership on aspects of collaborative spirit, complementarity of resources, private sector leadership, wide-ranging ramifications over other partnerships across time, timing and sustainability. Other countries intending to come up with their own rating tool can take stock of the Malaysian experience.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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