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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Juan Almandoz, Matthew Lee and Christopher Marquis

How does environmental uncertainty affect the process of starting new hybrid organizations? Our comparative analysis of the formation of two “green” banks – with hybrid…

Abstract

How does environmental uncertainty affect the process of starting new hybrid organizations? Our comparative analysis of the formation of two “green” banks – with hybrid goals linked to banking and environmental logics – reveals that shifts in their strategic orientations resulted from attempts to align uncertain and changing resource environments with the composition and goals of the organizations’ top leadership. While the initial idea and goals of the founders were similar, the organizations they established ended up with divergent strategic orientations and senior leadership groups.

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2017

Harshini Mallawaarachchi, Lalith De Silva and Raufdeen Rameezdeen

The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to determine the relationship and effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to determine the relationship and effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office buildings in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research hypotheses were tested by approaching the survey method under the quantitative phenomenon. The questionnaire survey was conducted among randomly selected occupants in three selected green-rated office buildings in Sri Lanka. The survey data were analysed by using the Spearman correlation and ordinal logistic regression analysis techniques to model the relationship existing between the variables. The SPSS v20 software was used in data analysis.

Findings

The findings confirm the relationship between built environment and occupants’ productivity. As it further proves that, there is a significant effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office buildings. Thus, critical built environment factors influencing occupants’ productivity and their effect were determined.

Practical implications

The findings could be practically implied as bases to strengthen the evaluation criteria of indoor environmental quality in GREENSL® national green-rating system.

Originality/value

The evaluation of occupants’ productivity and the built environment factors has been at the focal point of research; however, most studies have focused on single aspects of the built environment. Further, no evidences were found on “which factors” can critically influence the occupants’ productivity in green buildings. The paper, therefore, seeks to fill this gap by proving the relationship between green built environment and occupants’ productivity.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Nicole Bieak Kreidler and Sacha Joseph‐Mathews

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the idea of green atmospherics and propose a conceptual framework for green service environment factors and a typology for green

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the idea of green atmospherics and propose a conceptual framework for green service environment factors and a typology for green consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a conceptual piece. and offers a new approach to green consumerism. Green atmospherics goes beyond many of the typical factors explored in previous service environment studies. The paper examines how many terms commonplace in the design and architectural literature can be translated into the marketing arena. Factors such as daylighting, recycling, offgassing, insulation, optimal energy performance and design for the environment are discussed.

Findings

The paper proposes that “going green” goes beyond having recyclable or even sustainable products, to an ideology that incorporates improving worker morale and retention, and giving back to the communities they are located in. Additionally, the paper makes a case for classifying green consumers based on a psychographic segmentation approach compared to the more traditional socioeconomic classification.

Originality/value

This paper offers a conceptual framework for assessing green atmospherics within service environments and proposes a green consumer typology that references “stimuli” versus “socio‐demographics” for categorization. A new categorization is proposed and the importance of this topic to consumers, practitioners and researchers are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Yoon Jung Jang

This study aims to examine the impact of green atmospheric and communicative servicescape dimensions on customers’ emotional and behavioral outcomes and explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of green atmospheric and communicative servicescape dimensions on customers’ emotional and behavioral outcomes and explores the moderating effect of customer familiarity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from coffee shop customers in the USA. Structural equation modeling and a multigroup analysis were used for analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that the atmospheric dimensions of green coffee shops have a greater impact than communicative dimensions on customers’ green place attachment and loyalty. However, the effects of green servicescape depend on customer familiarity. The impact of the communicative servicescape on customers’ attachment and loyalty is significantly greater in a high-familiarity group than in a low-familiarity group.

Practical implications

The findings provide coffee shop managers with insights into effective design of a green service environment. Although managers focus on both dimensions, they may use customer familiarity as a segmenting or targeting tool in designing the green service environment and developing a sustained relationship with customers with different levels of familiarity.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing servicescape models by incorporating green place attachment as a construct to comprehend customers’ inner evaluations. It also contributes to the literature on attachment by demonstrating the clear linkage between both green servicescape dimensions and place attachment. This study highlights customer familiarity construct that should be a critical issue in advancing the understanding of customer behavior in the green servicescape context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Arpita Khare

The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (CSII) and demographics on ecologically conscious consumer behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (CSII) and demographics on ecologically conscious consumer behaviour (ECCB).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through mall intercept technique in six cities across India.

Findings

ECCB and CSII scales were applicable in Indian context. Factor analysis revealed two factors for ECCB scale: ecologically conscious purchase behaviour and green product attitudes. Normative, informative influence of CSII and income were predictors to ecologically conscious purchase behaviour. Normative influence emerged as predictor to green attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses itself only on CSII factors. It does not examine influence of variables like personal values, risk perception, and personality on ECCB. It does not examine role of consumers’ attitude towards conservation of energy and natural resources.

Practical implications

The findings can be of immense use to firms marketing green brands in India. Social group acceptance and conformance is important for Indian consumers; advertising and promotional campaigns should use social groups for marketing green products. Consumer involvement and engagement can be created through social networking web sites. Ecologically concerns should be rewarded in order to encourage consumers to adopt green attitudes.

Originality/value

Green marketing and ecologically conscious behaviour are upcoming research areas in India. There is limited research to understand Indian consumers’ concerns about environment. ECCB and CSII scales were used as it was assumed that using scales which have been tested and validated in other cultures would give reliable results.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Arpita Khare and Geetika Varshneya

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environment-friendly behaviour, peer influence and green apparel knowledge in the context of organic clothing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environment-friendly behaviour, peer influence and green apparel knowledge in the context of organic clothing purchase behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a survey carried out in three major metropolitan cities and a sample of total 889 respondents was collected who were college students in India.

Findings

Past environment-friendly behaviour influenced Indian youth’s organic clothing purchase behaviour. Green apparel knowledge and peer influence, interestingly, had no impact on organic clothing purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited to students who had past experience with green products. This was deliberately done as the objective was to examine the influence of past environment-friendly behaviour and green apparel knowledge on organic clothing purchase behaviour. Youth with limited awareness about organic clothing were not contacted. This restricted the findings to a specific youth segment. Further, the study was limited to Indian youth and did not examine the purchase behaviour of other consumer segments. Demographic variables were not used for analysis as only purchase behaviour of young people as a consumer segment was studied.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by organic apparel manufacturers in marketing organic clothing brands to the Indian youth. Organic clothing can be positioned to emphasise green values and distinct lifestyle for environment-conscious youths. Initiatives like celebrity talk-shows, organic clothing exhibitions, and launch of organic clothing designer brands can be used to promote organic apparel. College students can be used as opinion leaders to communicate benefits of organic clothing and inculcate green values among larger population.

Originality/value

Organic products and brands are becoming popular among Indian consumers. There has been limited research on the subject of youths’ purchase behaviour of organic clothing to date. Companies trying to launch organic clothing brands in the country may find the results helpful in understanding green buying behaviour.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Normalisa Md Isa, Arunnaa Sivapathy and Nur Nadia Adjrina Kamarruddin

Since the 1970s, the sustainable development was developed from science and environmental crusade. Since then, there were many programs done in the field but not named as…

Abstract

Since the 1970s, the sustainable development was developed from science and environmental crusade. Since then, there were many programs done in the field but not named as “Sustainable Development.” The environments have affected because of the process of the development which was noticed by the world community. Malaysia has made a commitment to the 2030 Agenda in September 2015 for the future of mother earth. Despite the increasing attention toward sustainable development and circular economy across the world, understanding of the potential sustainability synergy among developing countries remains sluggish. This chapter therefore briefly discusses the development of circular economy within developed and developing countries. The chapter then narrowed the discussion toward Malaysian practices of the circular economy. Malaysia also recorded among the countries that faced waste management issues in Asia. The detailed discussion includes Malaysian acceptance and initiatives in reaching a circular economy within the past years, present, and future. The discussion surrounds the circular economy practiced by Malaysian industrial players as well as government's initiatives in encouraging and educating Malaysian toward embracing the idea of circular economy and sustainable consumption. As most countries embrace green technologies, Malaysia has taken proactive steps toward adopting green technology. Among the four main policy priorities are energy, environment, economy, and social, the key to green technology in driving the country's economy while promoting sustainable development. In fact, the major economic drivers of the Malaysian economy involve industrial activities such as palm oil, mining, and manufacturing, which are now beginning to take steps toward the development of green technology development. The application of green technology can provide a balance between economic development and environmental preservation as well as solutions to climate change issues. The initiative aims to make Malaysia one of the best countries in the world with sustainable economic growth, innovation, and prosperous citizens by 2050.

Details

Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-806-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Harshini Mallawaarachchi, Lalith De Silva and Raufdeen Rameezdeen

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and occupants’ productivity improvements in green buildings in order…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and occupants’ productivity improvements in green buildings in order to propose probable enhancements of national green certification criteria.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey approach was selected under quantitative phenomenon. Hence, questionnaire survey was selected as a primary data collection technique. It was linked to semi-structured interviews to validate survey results. The survey data were analysed by using nonparametric statistical analysis techniques, such as significance testing and Spearman’s correlation. Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) v.20 statistical analysis software was used in data analysis.

Findings

Seven factors were identified as significant factors which showed statistically significant monotonic correlation to major IEQ dimensions. Among those, air quality and acoustical partitioning factors confirmed a statistically significant weak positive monotonic correlation, whilst system control showed strongly positive monotonic correlation to occupants’ productivity in green buildings.

Practical implications

The findings can be practically implied as a basis to review the existing evaluation criteria of IEQ in national green certification system to propose probable enhancements.

Originality/value

The significant IEQ factors influencing occupants’ productivity were determined as the focal point of this research. Accordingly, new provisions were proposed to enhance the national green certification criteria.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Arpita Khare

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environmental attitudes, social and personal environmental norms, social influence, and green self-identity on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine influence of past environmental attitudes, social and personal environmental norms, social influence, and green self-identity on Indian consumers’ green buying behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through self-administered survey method by contacting respondents through mall intercept technique in six cities across India.

Findings

The findings suggest that green self-identity, peer influence, and past green buying behaviour influence the decision to purchase green product. Consumers’ self-identification with environment-friendly traits was a major predictor to green buying behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Influence of social groups, personal norms, and self-identity were examined. However, the study did not focus on any specific brand or product category. Issues like green brands, price sensitivity, and trust can be examined.

Practical implications

The findings can help firms in understanding Indian consumers’ predisposition and attitudes towards green products. Green products should be related to individual’s identity and ecological beliefs. Firms can modify their marketing communication strategies by linking green products them with social and personal factors.

Originality/value

Influence of factors like past environmental attitudes, social and personal norms on green buying have not been examined in Indian context. The study adds to existing literature by applying self-construal theory in explaining green buying behaviour.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Hikari Kato, Linda Too and Ann Rask

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the perceptions by occupiers of green workplace environments. It examines how occupiers (both management and employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the perceptions by occupiers of green workplace environments. It examines how occupiers (both management and employees) perceive and evaluate the role of green workplace environments, and subsequently assesses the effectiveness of a green workplace environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on a data set derived from a survey of 128 respondents who have occupied Green Building Council Australia's Green Star‐rated offices and buildings for more than 12 months.

Findings

The findings suggest that green workplace offers greater psychological benefits (taking pride of the workplace environment) to occupiers than physical improvements (health and productivity gains). Further, management perceived greater benefits of green workplace compared to employees.

Research limitations/implications

This paper summarises the findings of the first phase of a longitudinal study. It is limited at this stage by a relatively small data sample, given that there are only a limited number of Green Star‐rated buildings that have been in operation for more than 12 months at this stage of data collection. However, the survey has a 36 per cent response rate and thus provides reasonable scope for generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

The results are useful to building owners and employers who need to be more aware of probable outcomes in terms of employee workplace satisfaction, and areas that may require particular attention in transitioning to green workplaces. The results are also useful to managers by highlighting areas of perceived deficiency in green workplaces and ensuring a more targeted effort in meeting the needs and expectations of employees.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical findings of the strengths and weaknesses of a relatively new concept, i.e. the green workplace. The findings from the Australian experience serves as a good benchmark for future similar studies.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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