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1 – 10 of over 25000
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Pia Heike Johansen

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a sector-based analysis of the drivers for social entrepreneurship in the agricultural sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a sector-based analysis of the drivers for social entrepreneurship in the agricultural sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses qualitative data from two studies in the Danish region of Northern Jutland. The data include responses from 38 farmers who offered or had considered offering social services. The analytical framework is taken from a review of the limited literature on Green Care and Social Farming and social entrepreneurship theory.

Findings

Strong and consistent tools for the categorisation of farmers’ social entrepreneurship have been developed. However, these tools have merely been used descriptively rather than to create proactive agriculture policies to facilitate social entrepreneurship. In Region Northern Jutland social entrepreneurship in farming is driven by a combination of tradition, close relationships and coincidence. It is ad hoc, with each initiative starting from scratch because no knowledge or experience has been gathered or distributed.

Research limitations/implications

The agricultural sector-based approach to social entrepreneurship will not be discussed against other approaches to social entrepreneurship. This would be a suggestion for another more conceptual kind of article in the future.

Originality/value

A study of social entrepreneurship among farmers has not yet been coupled with a sector-based analytical framework. This paper contributes to the literature of social entrepreneurship by supplementing with an agricultural sector-based approach.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Jostein Vik and Maja Farstad

Green care – the utilisation of farms as the basis for health services – is seen as a promising addition to other health services, and it is seen as a viable…

1124

Abstract

Purpose

Green care – the utilisation of farms as the basis for health services – is seen as a promising addition to other health services, and it is seen as a viable diversification strategy for many farm families. However, the number of such services is low both in Norway and in Europe in general. The development of green care seems to have stagnated. This paper seeks to analyze and discuss the case of Norwegian green care in order to reflect on the hindrances to the further development of a viable green care sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the green care market, green care policies and the interaction of social worlds that are necessary to make the green care sector function smoothly.

Findings

The conclusion is that there is a sound basis for a green care market and that there are sufficient political support and political engagement for the development of green care in Norway. The problem with the green care sector is the interaction between the “social worlds” involved in the sector – the suppliers/farmers, the users, and the (public sector) buyers. It is argued that the development of a green care market is hampered by the lack of an institutional framework and a set of market devices capable of bringing key actors together.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents an analysis of the Norwegian green care sector. It shows that there are substantial cross‐national differences between health service systems, and therefore comparisons between nations are difficult. However, the principal challenges – diverse social groups, the lack of institutional frames, and immature markets – are shared. Therefore, the need for further research is evident and there are lessons to be learned from cross‐national comparison and case studies.

Originality/value

Within the green care research field, there have been few social science studies that address organisational issues and the governance of this new and emerging business. Theoretically oriented and analytical contributions on organisational aspects of green care services are therefore timely. This paper is such a contribution.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Julie Barrett, Simon Evans and Neil Mapes

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent evidence relating to green (nature-based) dementia care for people living with dementia in long-term accommodation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent evidence relating to green (nature-based) dementia care for people living with dementia in long-term accommodation and care settings (housing for older people that provides both accommodation and care, such as residential care homes, nursing homes and extra care housing schemes). The review formed part of a pilot study exploring interaction with nature for people living with dementia in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Rather than a comprehensive systematic or critical literature review, the intention was to increase understanding of green dementia care to support the pilot study.

Design/methodology/approach

The review draws together the published and grey literature on the impacts of green (nature-based) dementia care, the barriers and enablers and good practice in provision. People living with dementia in accommodation and care settings are the focus of this review, due to the research study of which the review is part. Evidence relating to the impacts of engaging with nature on people in general, older people and residents in accommodation and care is also briefly examined as it has a bearing on people living with dementia.

Findings

Although interaction with the natural environment may not guarantee sustained wellbeing for all people living with dementia, there is some compelling evidence for a number of health and wellbeing benefits for many. However, there is a clear need for more large-scale rigorous research in this area, particularly with reference to health and wellbeing outcomes for people living with dementia in accommodation and care settings for which the evidence is limited. There is a stronger evidence base on barriers and enablers to accessing nature for people living with dementia in such settings.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review was conducted to support a pilot study exploring green (nature-based) dementia care in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Consequently, the focus of the review was on green dementia care in accommodation and care settings. The study, and thus the review, also focussed on direct contact with nature (whether that occurs outdoors or indoors) rather than indirect contact (e.g. viewing nature in a photograph, on a TV screen or through a window) or simulated nature (e.g. robot pets). Therefore, this paper is not a full review of all aspects of green dementia care.

Originality/value

This paper presents an up-to-date review of literature relating to green dementia care in accommodation and care settings. It was successful in increasing understanding to support a pilot study exploring opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. It demonstrated the impacts, value and accessibility of nature engagement in these settings and identified gaps in the evidence base. This review and subsequent pilot study provide a strong platform from which to conduct future research exploring green dementia care in accommodation and care settings.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2010

Joe Sempik

This article discusses the role that gardening, horticulture and farming can play in promoting mental well‐being and in supporting the recovery of individuals with mental…

Abstract

This article discusses the role that gardening, horticulture and farming can play in promoting mental well‐being and in supporting the recovery of individuals with mental health problems.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Deepti Jog and Divya Singhal

The purpose of this paper is to present a view point on greenwashing practices used by pseudo green players to gain competitive advantage.

1566

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a view point on greenwashing practices used by pseudo green players to gain competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a description of various tactics of greenwashing and suggest some strategies for real green companies to differentiate themselves.

Findings

Although there is a huge market available for green products, greenwashing brings a tough challenge for real green companies. This paper highlights various tactics used by pseudo green players to get competitive advantage with minimum green effort.

Practical implications

Real green companies are not able to differentiate themselves and thus lose market share.

Originality/value

The paper offers some strategies to tackle the challenges posed by greenwashing behavior.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Neil Mapes

This article explores the benefits of green exercise and open spaces for people living with dementia. These benefits are set within the existing general evidence base…

407

Abstract

This article explores the benefits of green exercise and open spaces for people living with dementia. These benefits are set within the existing general evidence base concerning well‐being and connection with nature. The scale of the social, economic and demographic challenges are outlined to enable potential opportunities to be identified. The benefits of green exercise, contact and connection with nature and open spaces for people with dementia and the current research gaps are identified. A case study of Dementia Adventure is highlighted, as are implications for practice.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Ambra Burls and Julian Ashton

Drawing on experience of working in the area of mental health and the environment, key issues are examined, and the theoretical framework is explained, including the…

154

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on experience of working in the area of mental health and the environment, key issues are examined, and the theoretical framework is explained, including the benefits to communities and to the local environment of working with nature.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview gave an opportunity for development of ideas underlying concepts including the natural health service, green health literacy and changes in behaviour during the pandemic.

Findings

The ways in which people and the environment benefit from interaction with nature are becoming well understood; in a sustainable model, the value of the local environment is appreciated and will benefit from the care of those involved in relevant activities. There is a need for targeted training for health professionals, environment agencies’ staff and the voluntary sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The economic value of nature as a contributing factor in to mental health is an area for research which could have major influence in policymaking. A meeting of a number of disciplines could further bring together social capital, health economics and ecology.

Practical implications

Projects that are sustainable in every sense are those which are long term, whose value can be measured in environmental and economic terms.

Social implications

Working models have been developed that involve people on the fringes of society and people with disabilities; they often become the movers in local organisations.

Originality/value

This is an extremely wide-ranging assessment of developments in the relationship between mental health and nature.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2010

Sonia Jackson

The Children Act 1989 ended a period of four decades during which the education of children and young people in care was almost entirely neglected. However, it was another…

1135

Abstract

The Children Act 1989 ended a period of four decades during which the education of children and young people in care was almost entirely neglected. However, it was another 20 years before education took its rightful place at the centre of provision for the care of children away from home. This article considers the contribution made to this process by the Act and its accompanying Guidance, what progress has been made and what were the obstacles, past and continuing, that have made it so difficult to narrow the gap in attainment between looked‐after children and others.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Jennifer Driscoll

There has been little research on the education of looked after children over the current school leaving age of 16, although the underperformance of this cohort at Key…

1082

Abstract

Purpose

There has been little research on the education of looked after children over the current school leaving age of 16, although the underperformance of this cohort at Key Stage 4 (age 14‐16) has been the subject of considerable academic commentary. This paper aims to contribute to understanding of the ways in which looked after young people nearing the end of compulsory education can be supported and encouraged to continue in education and training.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were undertaken with 12 designated teachers for looked after children and four virtual school heads, as part of the first stage of a three‐year longitudinal study following 20 looked after children in England from years 11‐13 (ages 15‐18).

Findings

Participants identified particular challenges in ensuring a successful educational transition for looked after young people in year 11 and expressed concern at the cumulative effect of multiple transitions at this stage on young people's lives. There appears, however, to be an increasing focus on and commitment to giving young people a “second chance” to acquire qualifications commensurate with their potential post‐16. The comparative advantages and disadvantages of school and further education colleges for this cohort at Key Stage 5 are considered.

Practical implications

The implications of the forthcoming extension of the school leaving age for professionals supporting looked after young people post‐16 are discussed.

Originality/value

The designated teacher for looked after children became a statutory role in 2009, and to date there has been little research on the role of these professionals, or the work of virtual schools.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Shuchi Pahuja

The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of selected company‐ and industry‐related variables on environmental disclosure practices (EDPs) of the large…

1789

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of selected company‐ and industry‐related variables on environmental disclosure practices (EDPs) of the large manufacturing Indian companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The work was done in three phases. In the first phase, an index of environmental disclosure was constructed consisting of 23 items of environmental information. Opinions of chartered accountants were obtained on the importance of each of these items in making sound investment and other decisions. Using this index, in the second phase, EDPs in the annual reports of 91 large manufacturing companies were examined for a period of three consecutive years. Environmental disclosure score (EDS) percentages were calculated for each of the companies for all the three years. The relationship between EDS percentages and ten selected variables was analyzed with the help of the multiple regression technique in the last phase.

Findings

The results provide strong evidence in support of the influence of variables size, profitability, sector, industry and environmental performance on EDPs.

Research limitations/implications

The work involves analysis of EDPs of large manufacturing companies in India only. Non‐manufacturing and small companies were excluded from the scope of the work. Disclosure of environmental information by other media like stand‐alone corporate environmental report (CER) and internet was not considered. It was felt that further research was necessary to find the impact of other factors like country origin, organizational culture, experience with pressure groups and media profile on disclosure practices.

Practical implications

It was felt that environmental reporting should be made mandatory in India at least in the major polluting industries. Companies should also voluntarily try to provide audited environmental information in the annual reports to build credibility and trust among corporate stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper presents empirical evidence of EDPs of large manufacturing companies in India. It provides an insight into the factors that cause a difference in these practices.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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