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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Ren Hong, Wang Runyuan and Du Yongjie

In the context of exploring and implementing China's new urbanization, green eco-city have become a transformation model for urban development. Sharpening green buildings

Abstract

In the context of exploring and implementing China's new urbanization, green eco-city have become a transformation model for urban development. Sharpening green buildings in the construction industry can significantly influence and determine China's economic growth trends, as well as the growth and overall development of its national economy. However, current green eco-city still lack appropriate standards and scientific theoretical basis to determine the target star program of green buildings. To fully implement the green building standards, establish and improve a sound technical standard system for the construction of green building demonstration areas, this study considers the spatial layout of green buildings as the core, adopts a plot potential evaluation method for evaluating a few green building plots, and utilizes four factors in verifying plots with great star potential. The study also establishes a system to calculate the star proportion of green buildings and applies the system in calculating the green building ratio of GM New District. Results indicate that the system can quantitatively analyze a plot potential, calculate the star proportion of green buildings scientifically and rationally, and provide some references for the construction of eco-city and the preparation of special planning for green buildings. The system construction is conducive to provide technical support for the construction of green eco-city. The improved system can be applied in the green building demonstration areas in China, and will be a reference model of constructing green building demonstration areas in the country.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2018

Shiwei Su and Dandan Wang

The development of modern building planning has become inseparable from the concept of green energy saving, which has gradually become an important method for…

Abstract

The development of modern building planning has become inseparable from the concept of green energy saving, which has gradually become an important method for energy-saving design of building planning and has become the research direction of planners. Based on this, the status quo of research on green building at home and abroad was investigated and the principle of energy saving for green building planning was put forward; then the building shape coefficient, eco-strategy design of green building energy, building energy-saving layout and other aspects were analyzed in detail; finally, the Amsterdam large CBD complex Valley green building was analyzed. The results show that the building has fully considered the energy-saving design in the process of planning and design, which not only ensures the commercial demand, but also reflects the residential use and finally achieves the goal of green energy saving.

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Open House International, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Chris Goodier and James Anthony Oppon

The majority of the literature on green buildings in Ghana focuses on environmental benefits, innovative designs, construction technologies and project management…

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of the literature on green buildings in Ghana focuses on environmental benefits, innovative designs, construction technologies and project management techniques. However, little is known about how such facilities are financed. This issue creates potential knowledge gaps, one of which this study aims to address. This study examines the key drivers for green building project financing in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an explanatory sequential design with an initial quantitative instrument phase, followed by a qualitative data collection phase. An extensive critical comparative review of the literature resulted in the identification of eight potential drivers. One hundred and twenty-seven questionnaire responses based upon these drivers from the Ghanaian construction industry were received. Data were coded with SPSS v22, analysed descriptively (mean, standard deviation and standard error) and via inferential analysis (One Way ANOVA and One-Sample t-Test). These data were then validated through semi-structured interviews with ten industry professionals within the Ghana Green Building Council. Data obtained from the semi-structured validation interviews were analysed through the side-by-side comparison of the qualitative data with the quantitative data.

Findings

Though all eight drivers are important, the five key drivers for the Ghanian construction industry were identified as, in order of importance, “high return on investment”, “emerging business opportunity”, “ethical investment”, “conservation of resources” and “mandatory regulations, standards, and policies”. The interviewees agreed to and confirmed the importance of these identified drivers for green building project financing from validating the survey's key findings.

Research limitations/implications

Key limitations of this study are the restrictions regarding the geographical location of the collected data (i.e. Kumasi and Accra); timing of the study and sample size (i.e. the COVID-19 pandemic making it difficult to obtain adequate data).

Practical implications

Though this study was conducted in Ghana, its implications could be useful to researchers, policymakers, stakeholders and practitioners in wider sub-Saharan Africa. For instance, financial institutions can invest in green buildings to expand their green construction and mortgage finance products to build higher value and lower risk portfolios. The findings from this study can provide investors with the enhanced certainty needed to help guide and inform their investment decisions, i.e. what to invest in, and when, by how much and how a scheme being “green” may influence their rate of return. Also, for building developers, it will give them a clearer understanding of the business case for green buildings and how to differentiate themselves in the market to grow their businesses.

Originality/value

This study's findings provide insights into an under-investigated topic in Ghana and offer new and additional information and insights to the current state-of-the-art on the factors that drive green building project financing.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Samuel Fiifi Hammond and Burcu Salgin

This study examines occupants' satisfaction with the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of a green-certified building [The Green Star South Africa (SA) Building] in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines occupants' satisfaction with the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of a green-certified building [The Green Star South Africa (SA) Building] in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Views of 300 respondents are solicited on 15 IEQ (obtained through a critical review of the literature and complemented with a pilot interview on the subject) parameters. Data obtained are analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

Findings suggest that occupants are generally satisfied with five critical aspects of IEQ. The results also indicate that the occupants perceive five key IEQ parameters to have high levels of importance. Further inferential analysis of the parameters revealed that two core IEQs require the highest levels of improvement actions.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in Ghana and analysed occupants' perceptions of working within one green-certified building. Again, the collection of the occupants' responses was not linked with the direct measurement of physical characteristics of the IEQ parameters of the building. Hence, the findings cannot be generalised.

Practical implications

Practically, the study contributes to providing all stakeholders involved in the Green Star SA Ghana certification system with the relevant feedback for their decision-making on current and future projects to be certified under this certification system.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable information on the performance of IEQ parameters of the building and points out potential IEQ areas that need improvement efforts, especially concerning current and future facilities certified under this certification system.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Saurabh Verma, Satya N. Mandal, Spenser Robinson, Deepak Bajaj and Anupam Saxena

This case study aims to appraise the financial benefits of green building construction in developing countries. The case study presents, green building's positive net…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to appraise the financial benefits of green building construction in developing countries. The case study presents, green building's positive net present value (NPV) investment in real terms and potentially enhanced stock market returns at the firm level compared to competitors.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study examines secondary data on a green building certification and longitudinal operation costs to estimate green building investments' financial benefits. The case study also compares the stock market performance of green building portfolio company with non-green building competitors of similar size and industry.

Findings

The case study finds out that the real return rate on green building investment is higher than the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of the company with an inflation-adjusted payback period of fewer than ten years. Findings compare favourably to the extant literature which was mostly in developed economies. The paper further highlights that stock market performance for a green building focused company shows improved returns to shareholders relative to non-green competitors.

Research limitations/implications

The results are specific to the time and building researched; green buildings costs have reduced over time, and a new study may show improved case study findings. The case study results on stock market performance are indicative and may need further research for evaluation.

Practical implications

The case study presents a model for critical appraisal of green buildings investment. The paper further indicates that green building investment may lead to operational savings and superior stock performance compared to competitors.

Originality/value

The paper presents a green building investment appraisal model which might be useful for the industry and academia. Developing countries have limited literature on green buildings' financial benefits; this case study quantifies the financial benefits and compares them with the available literature related to developed economies’ green buildings.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Book part
Publication date: 6 November 2012

David Gibbs and Kirstie O’Neill

Purpose – There has been a growing interest in the development of a ‘green’ or ‘low carbon’ economy as a means of reconciling economic development and the environment…

Abstract

Purpose – There has been a growing interest in the development of a ‘green’ or ‘low carbon’ economy as a means of reconciling economic development and the environment. Research on green entrepreneurs to date has been upon individual entrepreneurs, neglecting wider economic and social contexts within which they operate. By looking at these wider networks of support, we suggest that discourses of the lone entrepreneur innovating and changing business practices are misrepresentative.

Methodology/approach – Semi-structured interviews to investigate green entrepreneurship with green building companies and policy makers.

Findings – Combined with new demands from consumers for more environmentally friendly products and services, the changing shape of national and global economies is leading to new forms of entrepreneurship. We identify a number of tensions between policy intentions and businesses’ experiences on the ground.

Research limitations/implications – To date, research has only been undertaken in the UK – we recommend that future research takes other national contexts into account. Other economic sectors also represent promising areas for future research, potentially including social enterprises in the green economy. Sustainability transitions theories offer a potentially valuable means for understanding the role of businesses in engendering a green economy.

Practical implications – Implications for policy frameworks are outlined in the conclusions.

Originality/value of chapter – By incorporating policy and support organisations, and informal networks of support, the chapter challenges the dominant view of the lone entrepreneurial hero and points to the significance of networks for facilitating green entrepreneurship. This will be of importance for policy makers and funders of entrepreneurship programmes.

Details

Social and Sustainable Enterprise: Changing the Nature of Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-254-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Zahra Abdulhadi Shukra and Ying Zhou

Despite the construction industry's significant impact on high energy use and a growing carbon footprint, technologies like Green BIM help to optimize natural resources…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the construction industry's significant impact on high energy use and a growing carbon footprint, technologies like Green BIM help to optimize natural resources, reduce pollution, use sustainable space and work on human comfort and health. But the trend in a holistic approach is minimal. Thus, the paper aimed to systematically investigate Green BIM research and implementation trends using a mixed-method and also show the prospects of holistic Green BIM implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

First, we conducted a Scientometrics analysis on the topic using the Scopus database for the time interval of (2013–present). Secondly, the Qualitative Content Review method asserted the Scientometrics analysis result. Lastly, exploratory research was done on secondary data to compare the AEC industry trend for a comprehensive view.

Findings

The merged findings confirmed the partial implementation of Green BIM and of which 43% of research focused only on energy analysis. Despite the potential of BIM and the interrelationship among green building parameters, the result showed other aspects of green building and sustainable design parameters as green material selection, sustainable site, waste management and water-use efficiency not comprised.

Originality/value

The authors propose a new conceptual framework for integrating green building parameters, BIM tools and green building assessment tools in a life cycle of a project that adds into the sustainability of the Architectural, Engineering and Construction sector. The study would help to provoke researchers, software developers and practitioners for further innovative effort in holistic Green BIM implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Eric Kwame Simpeh and John Julian Smallwood

The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictable effect of economic and non-economic factors regarded as the most important to stimulate stakeholders’ behavioural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictable effect of economic and non-economic factors regarded as the most important to stimulate stakeholders’ behavioural intentions to adopt green building.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary data was collected from 106 green building accredited professionals in both the public and private sectors registered with the Green Building Council of South Africa. The data analysis techniques adopted include descriptive and inferential statistics, namely, factor analysis and logistic regression model (LRM).

Findings

The LRM results revealed five predictors and two control variables made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model. The strongest predictor to enhance the intention to adopt green building was a financial benefit (FB), recording an odds ratio of 9.1, which indicates that the likelihood to adopt is approximately 9.1 times more if FBs is evident.

Practical implications

It is anticipated that the most significant facilitators/enablers identified by built environment stakeholders will create an enabling environment to enhance the adoption of green building.

Originality/value

This research has contributed to the existing knowledge by developing a decision support model. The decision support model provides predictive indicators for clients, consultants and contractors to harness their resources and identify significant parameters to improve their decision-making in adopting green building.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Thendo Masia, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Akintayo Opawole

Green building is a relatively new concept with limited applications in property development in South Africa. The objectives of this study are therefore threefold…

Abstract

Purpose

Green building is a relatively new concept with limited applications in property development in South Africa. The objectives of this study are therefore threefold: identify key green building principles considered by property developers, establish the benefits of implementing the principles and determine the barriers to its applications.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a case study of two Green Star South Africa (SA)-certified buildings in Sandton, Johannesburg. These are Alexander Forbes building, and Ernst & Young Eris Towers. The two certified buildings were purposefully selected because of the insightful information they provide regarding application of green building principles. The main themes investigated in the cases are environmental awareness, green building principles applications, as well as benefits and barriers of green building. A total of six interviewees from the contractors', property developers', environmental/green building consultants' and sustainability consultants' organizations who were involved in the implementation of green building principles in the two cases provided the qualitative data for the study. The qualitative data were supplemented with data relating to the two case studies obtained from the ‘Earth Works for a Sustainable Built Environment’. The interviews were arranged over a period of two months, and each interview took between 20 and 30 minutes. Analysis of the data was done through a phenomenological interpretation of the qualitative opinions expressed by the interviewees.

Findings

Key green building principles comprising energy efficiency, water efficiency, resource efficiency, occupants' health and well-being and sustainable site development were implemented in the two cases. The fact that the buildings were rated 4-star enabled inference to be drawn that the implementation of the principles was less than 60 per cent. Energy efficiency of 35 per cent indicated in Case I suggests that the level is consistent with the South African green building standard of 25 per cent to 50 per cent. However, the energy and water efficiency assessment of the building were based on projections rather than on ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the buildings' performance. Moreover, perceived saving in operational cost was identified as dominant driver to green building principles implementation. Conversely, lack of government incentives and absence of reliable benchmarking data regarding performance of green buildings were major barriers to its full implementation.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide important implications to the developers and government on the application of green building principles. In the first place, the evidence that initial high cost premium could be off settled by long- term saving on operational costs as a result of use of local materials, energy and water savings as well as use of recycled material, as implemented in the two case projects, would improve investment decision in green building by developers. The understanding of the drivers and barriers to implementation of green building principles also has implications for guiding government policies and programmes towards green building.

Originality/value

The significance of this study stems from the fact that limited studies, especially in the South African context, have indicated the drivers and barriers to the implementation of green building principles. The case study approach adopted gave a novelty to the study by providing hands-on information from the stakeholders who were known to have played specific roles in the application of green building. The findings indicated that initial high cost premium was not a consideration in developers' choice of green building which justifies the possibility of a costlier product when factors such as environmental sustainability benefit is considered to be ultimate. The study thus suggests further research involving larger cases on energy efficiency, water efficiency and costs of green buildings compared to the conventional type to bring the findings to a broader perspective and assist to benchmark data for green building assessment.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Mahmoud Mawed, Vinay Tilani and Karima Hamani

Green retrofitting is acknowledged as an essential strategy toward achieving long-term sustainability in the built environment. To implement this strategy successfully…

Abstract

Purpose

Green retrofitting is acknowledged as an essential strategy toward achieving long-term sustainability in the built environment. To implement this strategy successfully, the role of facility managers cannot be ignored. The purpose of this paper is to investigate present practices that are used in managing the existing facilities, to highlight the elements that govern the process of green retrofitting, and discuss the efforts and contribution of facility managers in enhancing the environmental performance of the existing facilities stock in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

This study suggests that an adequate level of awareness of the benefits of green retrofit amongst owners and decision-makers is mostly dependent on facilities management (FM) professionals, who must establish effective communication channel with senior management. FM professionals in the UAE are well equipped and competent in greening existing buildings and can simultaneously lead a building to the path of achieving green building certification.

Findings

To examine the role of FM in a green retrofit and its current status in the UAE built environment, a two-step qualitative method was adopted. The study started by conducting semi-structured interviews with FM professionals and then assessing the insights obtained from the interviews against an actual case study of a LEED Existing Building certified facility.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews were limited to FM professionals in the private sector and the results from one case study should be considered cautiously.

Originality/value

This paper emphasizes the primordial role of FM professionals in promoting green retrofit in the UAE.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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