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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Ying-Yi Deng and Yi-Chun Yang

Few studies have explored how to foster green customer citizenship behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing green customer…

Abstract

Purpose

Few studies have explored how to foster green customer citizenship behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the factors influencing green customer citizenship behavior in a restaurant context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a conceptual model, based on previous studies, hypothesizing that green attributes transparency engenders green brand image and green trust, which together facilitate green customer citizenship behavior. The authors used structural equations modeling with data collected from 312 consumers in Taiwan to do the analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that green attributes transparency plays a strong role in determining green brand image and green trust, which enhance green customer citizenship behavior. Managerial implications to aid businesses in developing strategies to enhance their ability to foster green citizenship behavior among its consumers for competitive advantage is also provided, together with an outline of the limitations of the study.

Originality/value

This study used the concept of stimulus–organism–response to test the stimuli of green attributes transparency to enhance customer citizenship behavior mediated by green brand image and green trust. This study makes two theoretical contributions. First, this study extended the concept of attributes transparency, brand image, trust and customer citizenship behavior to a green context. The authors developed a research framework and confirmed that green attributes transparency facilitate green brand image and green trust, which contribute to green customer citizenship behavior. Second, there is no prior study exploring the relationship between green attributes transparency, green brand image, green trust and green customer citizenship behavior. The empirical support for the model developed in this study is based on empirical data of Taiwan restaurant consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Jialing Lin and Zhimin Zhou

The purpose of this study is to investigate how green brand positioning facilitated by utilitarian environmental benefits and nature connectedness may influence green brand

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how green brand positioning facilitated by utilitarian environmental benefits and nature connectedness may influence green brand image, as mediated by green perceived value (GPV) and brand innovativeness and how brand type moderates these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey method, and structural equation modeling was employed to test the research hypotheses with a sample of 826 Chinese respondents.

Findings

The results demonstrate that utilitarian environmental benefits directly enhance green brand image. Both utilitarian environmental benefits and nature connectedness indirectly influence green brand image through GPV and brand innovativeness. Subsequently, green brand innovativeness positively affects GPV. The moderating effects of brand type on the relationships in the model are also established.

Practical implications

Organisations should enhance green value and brand innovativeness when adopting green brand positioning tools to strengthen green brand image and implement diverse green branding strategies between brands of physical goods and services.

Originality/value

Although previous studies have investigated how perceived benefits affect the development of brand image, the issue has not been examined based on the human associative memory framework from a green branding perspective. No empirical study has simultaneously included both green brand innovativeness and GPV in this formation process. Additionally, the moderating role of brand type in the model has not been explored previously.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Herbjørn Nysveen, Ove Oklevik and Per Egil Pedersen

This paper aims to examine the influence of a brand’s innovativeness and green image on customers’ sensory, affective, cognitive, relational and behavioral brand

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2028

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of a brand’s innovativeness and green image on customers’ sensory, affective, cognitive, relational and behavioral brand experience and, through that, on brand satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

To collect primary data, the study used a list of 1,754 e-mail addresses from a hotel in Norway. Of the invited respondents, 283 completed the questionnaire.

Findings

The study shows positive influences of perceived brand innovativeness and green image on the experience dimensions. The influences of the brand experience dimensions on brand satisfaction are mixed. The results indicate that the brand experience dimensions partially mediate the influences of perceived brand innovativeness and green image on brand satisfaction. The study also shows a positive influence of perceived brand innovativeness on perceived green image.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the importance of carefully managing brands’ innovativeness and green image to improve brand experiences and satisfaction with the hotel.

Originality/value

Few studies exist on hotel brand experience, and therefore, future studies should identify antecedents and consequences of hotel brand experience (King, 2017; Khan and Rahman, 2017). This paper examines the role of hotel brand experiences with an explicit focus on the antecedents of such experiences.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Jialing Lin, Antonio Lobo and Civilai Leckie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the formation of green brand image through customers’ perceptions of the functional and emotional benefits associated with green

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5017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the formation of green brand image through customers’ perceptions of the functional and emotional benefits associated with green brands and the influence of green brand image on purchase behavioural response. Additionally, the influence of a moderating variable (green perceived risk) on this formation process is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey administered to a consumer panel in China. Structural equation modelling was used to test the conceptual model.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the provision of utilitarian benefits and self-expressive benefits directly enhance the brand’s green image. Also, utilitarian benefits and green brand image have direct influences on green brand loyalty. Green perceived risk negatively moderates the relationship between utilitarian benefits and green brand image.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends previous research by examining the development of green brand image and investigating the moderating role of green perceived risk in this process. Also, this study enriches research on green brand and corporate branding by investigating the relationship between green brand image and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

Although previous research has examined how perceived benefits influence the development of corporate brand image, the issue has not been investigated from a green branding perspective. Moreover, the moderating role of green perceived risk in the formation of green brand image has not been explored, despite the concerns relating to greenwash which have been raised in several green brand studies. Finally, green brand image was found to be a strong antecedent of brand loyalty, besides the predominant elements of green trust and green satisfaction.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Reza Salehzadeh, Maryam Sayedan, Seyed Mehdi Mirmehdi and Parisa Heidari Aqagoli

Green brands are those brands that obtain attributes and benefits related to the reduction of the brands’ environmental impact. Green brand love is a very important issue…

Abstract

Purpose

Green brands are those brands that obtain attributes and benefits related to the reduction of the brands’ environmental impact. Green brand love is a very important issue for marketing managers. One of the main reasons for this degree of importance is because of the many positive outcomes that green brand love will have for organizations. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of green brand image, trust and attitude on green brand love among Muslim consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a cross-sectional survey is conducted based on the questionnaire method to collect data from a sample of 201 consumers of various automobile brands in Isfahan, Iran. Structural equation modeling is used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that green brand image has a significant direct effect on green brand attitude, love and trust. In addition, the results indicate that green brand attitude and trust have a significant direct effect on green brand love.

Practical implications

Considering the importance of the issue of automobility and environmental harm, this paper offers new insights to marketing managers of the automotive industry in Iran.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to explore the effect of green brand image, trust and attitude on green brand love.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Pedro Cuesta-Valiño, Pablo Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, María-Pilar Sierra-Fernández and María-Belén Aguirre García

This study analyses the dimensions of the brand equity of organic agri-food products using a multidimensional approach. It also examines the direct and indirect…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the dimensions of the brand equity of organic agri-food products using a multidimensional approach. It also examines the direct and indirect relationships of this brand equity with consumers’ green satisfaction and the green image of organic agri-food products. The green brand can be understood as a tool for entrepreneurial development.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers develop a conceptual framework highlighting the dimensions of the green brand equity focusing on five constructs (green brand loyalty, green perceived quality, green brand associations, green brand awareness and the new dimension of green brand emotion), green satisfaction and green brand image. The sample consisted of 392 people aged over 18 who were occasional or habitual consumers of organic agri-food products. Partial least squares (PLS), a structural equation modelling (SEM) tool, was used in the analyses.

Findings

The results of this study show that the different dimensions of green brand equity (except for green brand awareness) reflect this variable and are important factors in its perception by consumers. This study differs from others in that it treats green brand equity as a truly multidimensional variable made up of different dimensions with different measurement scales. The study also demonstrates the importance of green satisfaction and green brand image as antecedents of green brand equity.

Practical implications

The measurement scale for green brand equity developed in this study provides entrepreneurs of organic agri-foods with a method for evaluating consumer perception of green brand equity based on those dimensions that are truly significant.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the relationships of green brand equity—as a multidimensional concept—with other variables, such as green satisfaction and green image.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Lin Zhang, Jintao Wu, Honghui Chen and Bang Nguyen

Drawing on the branded service encounters perspective, the purpose of this study is to investigate how frontline service employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the branded service encounters perspective, the purpose of this study is to investigate how frontline service employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors affect customers’ brand evaluations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conducted two experiments. The first experiment explored the effect of frontline service employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors on customers’ brand evaluations via corporate hypocrisy. The second experiment explored the moderation effect of employees’ prototypicality and the importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) among customers.

Findings

Experiment 1 indicates that for firms with a green brand image, frontline employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors result in customers’ perception that the firm is hypocritical, thus reducing their brand evaluations. Experiment 2 shows that employee prototypicality and CSR importance to the customer enhance the negative impact of frontline employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors on customers’ brand evaluations through customers’ perception of corporate hypocrisy.

Research limitations/implications

This study is one of the first efforts to explore how frontline service employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors affect customers’ responses. It helps understand the impact of frontline employees’ counter-productive sustainable behaviors on customers’ brand perception, as well as the relationship between CSR and employees.

Practical implications

This study suggests that firms’ green brand image does not always lead to positive customer response. When frontline employees’ behaviors are inconsistent with firms’ green brand image, it can trigger customers’ perceptions of corporate hypocrisy and thus influence their brand evaluations. Therefore, firms should train frontline service employees to make their behaviors align with the firms’ green brand image.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first efforts to explore how frontline service employees’ environmentally irresponsible behaviors affect customers’ responses. It helps understand the impact of frontline employees’ counter-productive sustainable behaviors on customers’ brand perception, as well as the relationship between CSR and employee.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Maha Mourad and Yasser Serag Eldin Ahmed

The purpose of this empirical research is to study the main factors affecting the green brand preference in the telecom industry in Egypt as an example of an emerging…

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7620

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical research is to study the main factors affecting the green brand preference in the telecom industry in Egypt as an example of an emerging innovative market.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers develop a conceptual framework highlighting the dimensions of the green brand preference focusing on four constructs; green brand image, green satisfaction, green trust, and green awareness. The researchers started with a qualitative exploratory research in order to support the conceptual framework followed with a quantitative research in the form of a survey distributed among 302 respondents.

Findings

The consumers tended to disagree that they are aware of environmental promotions or that they recognize the meaning of environmental slogans and labels for their preferred brand. It was also found that the correlation between green awareness and green brand preference is the weakest. On the other hand; there is a strong correlation and a positive effect of the other factors (green brand image, green awareness and green trust) and green brand preference. The effect of the factors on green brand preference wasn’t significantly different for different genders, while it was significantly different for different ages, income levels and education levels.

Practical implications

The results of this research confirmed what the experts agreed upon during the exploratory phase and gave the researchers more confidence that the first step to start using green marketing principles in Egypt is to enhance the green image, satisfaction and trust as well as educating them on the importance of the green activities.

Originality/value

The research includes conceptual contribution in a trial to develop a conceptual framework to green brand preference in an innovative industry. In addition, there is empirical contribution since according to the researchers knowledge there is not any single paper on green branding strategies in the Egyptian market as an example of an emerging market.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Mei-Fang Chen and Chia-Lin Lee

As huge environmental impacts caused by the coffee industry are significant and controversial in the course from cultivation to consumption, the purpose of this paper is…

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6683

Abstract

Purpose

As huge environmental impacts caused by the coffee industry are significant and controversial in the course from cultivation to consumption, the purpose of this paper is to investigate whether or not different types of green claims based on the product lifecycle can lead to different extents of green psychological variables including purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The green claims of Starbucks were chosen as the research target for this study not only because the coffee chain store is working on the “Starbucks” Shared Planet’ program, which makes a commitment to do business in ways that are good for people and the planet, but also because such a program can be categorized into three major green message elements on the basis of the product lifecycle. A total of 920 valid self-reported questionnaires collected in Taiwan were used for this empirical analysis.

Findings

One-way ANOVA results reveal that all of the three green claims of Starbucks can lead to consumers building up the same level of green brand image of this company, with “ethical sourcing” significantly possessing more impacts on the other green psychological variables (i.e. green trust, green satisfaction, green brand equity, and green purchase intention).

Practical implications

The empirical results and findings from this study are helpful to the coffee industry marketers if they, in formulating various promotion campaigns, can communicate with the consumers with an eye to increasing their green brand image and other green psychological variables, including green purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to introduce different types of green claims on a basis of the product lifecycle to examine whether or not consumers’ green psychological variables will be different.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Chung-Shing Chan and Lawal M. Marafa

This paper aims to connect green spaces with city branding by introducing a proposed Green (Resource) Brand Hexagon (GBH).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to connect green spaces with city branding by introducing a proposed Green (Resource) Brand Hexagon (GBH).

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically tested the principles of the GBH with samples of Hong Kong residents (n = 301) and visitors (n = 395). Surveys were carried out to investigate the perceptions of the 23 elements in the GBH by both respondent groups.

Findings

A comparison of the results via factor analysis identified two green brand structures preferred by local residents (a brand pentagon) and by visitors (a brand square). The findings suggest different associations of green resource elements in their brand perceptions, which were partly reflected in the governmental Brand Review exercise in Hong Kong in 2008. Inter-group differences in the ranking of GBH’s elements also indicate a knowledge gap between visitors and residents.

Research limitations/implications

The modification process of the GBH from Anholt’s City Brand Hexagon framework involved researchers’ interpretations and understanding of green resources in Hong Kong; it inevitably produced some degree of subjectivity. The working definition of “green resources” in this study perceptually excluded certain features in public parks, such as the geological landscapes and beaches that are, in principle, part of the Hong Kong Geopark.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper offer an indicative green brand framework for destination marketers and brand managers whose cities enjoy attractive green resources. The ratings of GBH’s elements provide useful references for local brand management through an understanding of strong green brand attributes and structures by local residents and visitors. The inter-group comparison of the green brand structures also informs policymakers and city marketers about the divergent associations of brand elements for possible brand extension. Finally, the results are also very beneficial because they provide an opportunity for regional green brand development.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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