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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Jing Yi Yong and Yusliza Mohd-Yusoff

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of strategic human resource (HR) competencies of HR professionals on the adoption of green human resource management…

4177

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of strategic human resource (HR) competencies of HR professionals on the adoption of green human resource management (HRM) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach using survey was employed to get insights from 87 HR professionals from Malaysian manufacturing and service companies.

Findings

The findings revealed that only strategic positioner and change champion are significantly related to green HRM practices. Specifically, strategic positioner associates positively with all green HRM practices including green analysis and description of job position, green recruitment, green selection, green training, green performance assessment, and green rewards. Additionally, change champion is positively related to green analysis and description of job position, and green rewards.

Originality/value

The extant literature suggests HR professionals’ competencies can play a key role in adopting green HRM. However, examining the relationship between strategic HR competencies and each of the green HRM practices has been limited. As such, this study is timely to address the existing gap in the literature and provide fresh insights and implications in this regard.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Kavitha Sathasivam, Rosmawani Che Hashim and Raida Abu Bakar

This paper focusses on the roles and experiences of the human resource managers and safety, health and environment managers in promoting environmental sustainability in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focusses on the roles and experiences of the human resource managers and safety, health and environment managers in promoting environmental sustainability in automobile industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploration uses the data generated from ten in-depth interviews with human resource managers as well as safety, health and environment (SHE) managers from three automobile companies.

Findings

Three main themes were derived from the inductive analysis in support of environmental sustainability. They comprised environment-oriented perspectives, green human resource management (HRM) practices and supportive mechanisms. These findings served as insights for the HR managers who played a supportive role in environment sustainability. This study also found that Green HRM practices within the automobile industry were confined to green training and development, green rewards, green employee involvement and green orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The outcome of this study carries implications for managers and businesses in designing a more sophisticated framework for Green HRM practices for their companies so as to achieve a more progressive sustainable goal. For instance, HR managers who are environment-oriented can play a more active role in environmental sustainability. They can participate directly in developing policies by co-partnering with their SHE colleagues. They can encourage and motivate their employees to apply green practices both at work and in their homes. This integration would eventually create a cascading effect that could reduce the industry's negative impact on environment, thereby developing a more environmentally-friendly society.

Practical implications

This study provided practical implications for both the HR and SHE managers in taking up responsibilities in environmental sustainability. This study also indicated the practical implications for the top management in the automobile industry, especially in the designing of the environmental sustainability framework.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the Green HRM area by understanding and comparing the roles of the HR managers and their counterpart, the SHE managers, in support of environmental sustainability. The comparison would provide a clearer picture on how the implementation of Green HRM can be implemented within the automobile industry.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the development of green skills across firms located in an institutional context, specifically the national education and skill-formation system, of the under-researched developing country of Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper qualitatively explores the Thai education and skill-formation system and conducts a cross-case analysis of four firms across different industries in Thailand. The empirical findings in this paper draws on semi-structured interviews with various stakeholders; field visits to vocational colleges, universities, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) and firms across industries both in Bangkok and in other provinces in Thailand; and a review of archival documents and web-based reports and resources.

Findings

This paper proposes that firms across industries in Thailand must be responsible for helping their employees/workers obtain the green knowledge and skills necessary to perform green jobs through high-road human resource (HR) practices in response to the fact that the Thai education and skill-formation system is unlikely to produce a sufficient number of employees/workers who have green knowledge, skills and abilities and are industry-ready to perform green jobs, leading to a shortage of employees/workers who possess green skills in the labor market. Specifically, curricula in vocational colleges and universities in Thailand are not likely to respond to the needs of firms in producing those employees/workers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research concern its methodology. This research is based on the qualitative studies of the Thai education and skill-formation system and a case study of firms across industries in Thailand. Thus, this paper does not aim to generalize the findings to all other countries but to enrich the discussion on the effects of macro-level HR policies on the creation of green jobs and the development of green skills across firms in each country. Additionally, it is difficult to gain access to firms across several industries and various stakeholders to understand the development of green skills among employees in these firms. The reasons are resource constraints, time constraints and the hesitation of firms in permitting the author to access the data. These difficulties have restricted the sources of information to construct a more nuanced picture of firms across various industries in developing green skills among their existing employees. Consequently, this research does not include firms in several other industries, including the pulp and paper industry, textile and garment industry, plastic industry and agri-food industry. Thus, future research may extend the topic of the development of green skills among employees to these industries. Quantitative studies using large samples of firms across industries may also be useful in deepening the understanding of this topic, which is significant from the perspectives of the strategic human resource management (SHRM), comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and green economy.

Practical implications

This paper also provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand, other developing countries and other emerging market economies with deficiencies in the national education and skill-formation system. First, the top managers and/or HR managers can apply various methods to internally develop managers and employees/workers with the appropriate environmental/green knowledge and necessary skills to perform green jobs. The methods include classroom training, on-the-job training, coaching, mentoring systems, job shadowing and being role models for younger generations of employees. Second, these top managers and/or HR managers can cooperate with vocational colleges and/or universities in their countries to design educational programs/curricula related to environmental/green management to be able to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for their firms. These managers can request for assistance from universities in their countries when their firms confront sophisticated questions/problems related to environmental/green management. In this regard, universities will have an opportunity to solve real environmental/green problems experienced by industries, while firms can appropriately and accurately solve environmental/green questions/problems. Third, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their firms to apply for certificates of green-/environmentally friendly products or carbon footprint labels from NGOs to foster a green image among firms' consumers. These applications require the firms to pay special attention to the cultivation of green awareness and the development of green skills among their employees. Fourth, these top managers and/or HR managers can encourage their employees to express green-/environmentally friendly behaviors as well as sufficiency-based consumption behaviors. In fact, these top managers and/or HR managers can foster their employees to reduce energy consumption, including electricity and water, to conserve these types of energy for young generations. Fifth, these top managers and/or HR managers can adopt and implement green human resource management (GHRM) practices consisting of green recruitment and selection, green training and development, green performance management, green pay and rewards and green employee relations in their firms to upgrade both the environmental and social performances of firms. Finally, these top managers and/or HR managers must take serious actions regarding the implementation of environmental/green management policies and practices within their firms in order to facilitate the movement of the country toward the bioeconomy, circular economy, and green economy (BCG economy).

Social implications

This paper provides social/policy implications for the government, vocational colleges and universities in Thailand, other developing countries and emerging market economies where the skill shortage problem is still severe. First, the government of each country should incorporate green/environmental policies into the national education policy and the long-term strategic plan of the country. Second, the government should continuously implement such national policy and strategic plan by encouraging government agencies, vocational colleges, universities, firms and NGOs to cooperate in developing and offering environmental/green management educational programs/curricula to produce graduates with suitable qualifications for those firms. Third, the government should encourage vocational colleges and universities to equip their students with green skills to be industry-ready in a real working context. Fourth, to alleviate the skill shortage problem in the labor market, the government should foster firms, especially private sector firms, to focus on the upskilling and reskilling of their existing employees. With this action, their existing employees will have green skills, be able to effectively perform green jobs and become an important driver to help the country move toward the BCG economy. Fifth, the government of each country should encourage firms to develop green-/environmentally friendly products by offering them various types of incentives, including tax reductions or tax exemptions. Sixth, the government should encourage universities in the country to sign a memorandum of understanding with leading research institutes and world-class digital technology companies such that these institutes and/or companies admit high-potential university students to work as trainees/entry-level employees for a certain duration. This action can ultimately facilitate knowledge transfer from these institutes and/or companies to those university students who will finally return to work in their home country. Seventh, the government, especially the Ministry of Education, should encourage vocational colleges and universities to teach students in the environmental/green management program based on real case studies/problems found across firms. In this way, graduates should be industry-ready to perform green jobs. Finally, the government must pay serious attention to the implementation of environmental/green management policies across levels within the country so that the transition of the country toward the BCG economy will finally come true in the future.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the SHRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices, and the literature on the green economy and the development of green skills in firms in the following ways. First, this paper focuses on examining how the institutional context of Thailand shapes the development of green knowledge and skills among employees across firms in Thailand. In this regard, the paper aims to fill the gap in the literature on strategic HRM and comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices as proposed by Batt and Banerjee (2012) and Batt and Hermans (2012), who suggested that the literature on strategic HRM should go beyond the organizational context and examine how firms adopt and implement HR practices in response to the national institutional context. Second, the paper aims to extend the literature on the green economy regarding the roles played by institutional factors in shaping the development of green knowledge and skills across firms. Finally, strategic HRM, comparative institutional perspectives on HR strategies and practices and green economy studies have overlooked the under-researched country of Thailand. Most studies in these three areas focus more on developed countries. Thus, the findings of this paper should extend the literature on those areas regarding the development of green skills among employees across firms in response to the Thai institutional context.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Mohd-Yusoff Yusliza, Nur Zahiyah Othman and Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour

Drawing on the resource-based view (RBV) theory, the purpose of this paper is mainly to show how electronic human resource management (HRM), green employee empowerment…

2846

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the resource-based view (RBV) theory, the purpose of this paper is mainly to show how electronic human resource management (HRM), green employee empowerment, and human resource (HR) business partner role may influence green HRM practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was proposed to test the direct effect of the three independent variables – and key HR factors – on green HRM. Self-administered questionnaire was adopted in a systematic collection of data from manufacturing and service organizations in Malaysia. The partial least squares method was used to test the conceptual framework of the study.

Findings

The empirical results demonstrate that green employee empowerment has a significant positive relationship with all dimensions of green HRM practices; the added value of HR business partner role is an important aspect in ensuring the successful implementation of green HRM practices; and surprisingly, electronic HRM was not significantly related with all dimensions of green HRM practices.

Originality/value

As revealed by searches of ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus, there is no similar work which tested a similar framework based on evidence from an emerging economy. Based on RBV, it is possible to suggest that green employee empowerment and the role of HR as a Business Partner constitute unique resources when adopting green HRM practices.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Priyanka Aggarwal and Tanuja Agarwala

Environment concerns and climate changes have led organizations to reorient their processes with a focus toward sustainability. Organizations recognize that incorporating…

Abstract

Purpose

Environment concerns and climate changes have led organizations to reorient their processes with a focus toward sustainability. Organizations recognize that incorporating greening in HR practices has the potential to address environmental concerns. The present study aims to focus on investigating the relationship between green human resource management (GHRM) practices and environmental performance (EP). It is premised that the adoption of green human resource practices facilitates the development of a green organizational culture (GOC) that helps the organization to gain strategic business advantage with respect to the competitors. The literature suggests that the adoption of green human resource practices among organizations is at a nascent stage. The present study focusses on understanding the mediating role of three dimensions of GOC, that is, degree, diffusion and depth in the relationship between green human resource practices and EP that has not been addressed in the empirical literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study developed a model consisting of GHRM practices as an independent variable, the three dimensions of culture (degree, diffusion and depth) as mediators, and EP as the dependent variable. The study followed a quantitative exploratory research approach. The sample consisted of 278 employees from private and public sector organizations located in India. The hypothesized model was analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The study found the green human resource practices to be significantly related with EP of the organization. Results of parallel mediation confirmed that the “degree” dimension of GOC played a significant mediating role in the relationship between green human resource practices and EP of the organization. The other two dimensions of GOC, diffusion and depth, did not have a significant mediating role in this relationship. The findings of the study have been explained in the context of social identity theory, resource based view and ability–motivation–opportunity theory.

Practical implications

The study provides practical insights for researchers and managers who seek to adopt sustainability objectives in the organization. The findings have the potential to encourage human resource managers to adopt green human resource management practices toward promoting a culture of greening in the organization. The importance of developing and measuring EP targets for industry leadership is also emphasized.

Originality/value

The originality of the study lies in classifying and understanding GOC in terms of three dimensions, that is, degree, diffusion and depth, following the model proposed by Harris and Crane (2002). The three dimensions help in assessing the current level of GOC. This assessment promotes the judicious application of resources by the organization and adopts green practices to foster the organizational EP.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Jing Yi Yong, M.-Y. Yusliza, Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour and Noor Hazlina Ahmad

Green human resource management (HRM) has been considered to be a vitally important mechanism for companies to move towards a sustainable organization. By adopting the…

1627

Abstract

Purpose

Green human resource management (HRM) has been considered to be a vitally important mechanism for companies to move towards a sustainable organization. By adopting the Ability-Motivation-Opportunity as the underpinning theory, the purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that facilitate the adoption of Green HRM in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory approach research was adopted in this study. The required data for this study were collected using semi-structured face-to-face interviews with human resources directors and managers from four large manufacturing companies in Malaysia. The data collected was then reorganized into four themes.

Findings

Based on the interview, four key factors that influence the adoption of Green HRM include stakeholder pressures, relative advantage, which means the perceived benefits from implementing Green HRM, top management commitment and green intellectual capital, which means the intellectual capital incorporating green innovation or environmental management. Surprisingly, among the three dimensions of green intellectual capital, only green human capital and green structural capital were greatly discussed by the human resources directors and managers, while the role of green relational capital on the adoption of Green HRM was hardly observed.

Originality/value

Research studies on Green HRM in Malaysia are scarce. The originality of this paper lies in its exploration of Green HRM in an environmental sensitive sector and the insight it provides to academics and practitioners involved in the manufacturing sector. Although research findings cannot be generalized, they can be used as insights for both academics and end-users in emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Sheena Fatima Paro Ragas, Flora Mae Angub Tantay, Lorraine Joyce Co Chua and Carolyn Marie Concha Sunio

The purpose of this paper is to determine the moderating role of green lifestyle to the impact of green human resource management (GHRM) on employee’s job performance from…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the moderating role of green lifestyle to the impact of green human resource management (GHRM) on employee’s job performance from various industries and a possible spillover of GHRM to employee’s lifestyle.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and exploratory factor analysis were utilized in order to determine the relationship of the variables. A survey questionnaire was distributed to 332 respondents from various private industries who were randomly selected for this study.

Findings

This study shows that the implementation of GHRM has an effect on an employee’s lifestyle and also on their job performance. It suggests that organizations can contribute to the environment and also maintain employees’ good performance.

Research limitations/implications

Considering the locus of the study, it was restricted to industries from the National Capital Region in the Philippines. The study was also limited to industries who are ISO14001 certified, aiming for that certification, or implementing green practices. The survey was also not disseminated according to age groups and gender. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to explore further the effects of these variables to other factors.

Practical implications

This study may encourage human resource practitioners to implement GHRM practices in the workplace to motivate employees to participate in greening the world.

Originality/value

This study brings great importance to the implementation of GHRM as it is needed by the current status of the world.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 66 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Wenhao Song, Hongyan Yu and Hui Xu

Green human resource management (GHRM) is critical to enhancing the ability of the companies' green innovation, but this link is rarely explored or empirically tested in…

1863

Abstract

Purpose

Green human resource management (GHRM) is critical to enhancing the ability of the companies' green innovation, but this link is rarely explored or empirically tested in the literature. Drawing upon human capital theory, the study examines a conceptual model that incorporates the effects of green human capital and management environment concern.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 143 firms in China, and the regression analysis and bootstrapping test were used to assess the hypothesis.

Findings

Our findings indicate that GHRM can positively influence green innovation, and green human capital mediated the link between GHRM and green innovation. In addition, management environment concern moderates the effect of GHRM on green human capital. The results further explore that the indirect effect of GHRM on green innovation through green human capital is significant for the firms with a high management environment concern, but not for this relationship with a low management environment concern.

Originality/value

The findings further extend the scope of GHRM research, and theoretical and practical implications of GHRM are presented to enhance environment sustainability.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Muhammad Ali, Chin-Hong Puah, Anum Ali, Syed Ali Raza and Norazirah Ayob

The role of green human resource management in Islamic banking remains relatively unexplored. This study focuses on how green human resource management plays a part using…

1684

Abstract

Purpose

The role of green human resource management in Islamic banking remains relatively unexplored. This study focuses on how green human resource management plays a part using intellectual capital and how green human resource improves employee commitment, eco-friendly behavior and environmental performance in Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper integrated two well-established theoretical frameworks, namely, intellectual capital-based view theory and social identity theory. A survey-based research instrument was employed to collect sample data of 231 respondents. To test hypotheses, we considered partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM)-based approach using SmartPLS.

Findings

The results indicate that green human capital, green structural capital and green relational capital significantly influenced green human resource management. Similarly, green human resource management showed a significant positive impact on employee commitment, eco-friendly behavior and environmental performance. Moreover, this study found significant positive results on the interrelationship between employee commitment, eco-friendly behavior and environmental performance. The outcomes recommend that Islamic bank HR managers and top management should strengthen green human resource management policies. Additionally, the Islamic bank HR department should consider bank intellectual capital and employee social identity while making environment-friendly policies.

Originality/value

This study provides novel contributions by offering some useful guidelines to Islamic bank managers and practitioners. In addition, our research aids general green human resource literature and adds value to promoting a sustainable organization.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2022

Raghad Aldaas, Rosmah Mohamed, Mass Hareeza Ali and Noor Azlin Ismail

The research aimed to study the influence of green human resources management practices (GHRMPs) on green supply chain management (GSCM) and environmental performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The research aimed to study the influence of green human resources management practices (GHRMPs) on green supply chain management (GSCM) and environmental performance while examining how those green practices affect environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated 314 cases (responses) from the small and medium-sized enterprises belonging to the service sector from an emergent economy (i.e. Oman). The study model was developed based on the theory of resource-based view and the theory of ability, motivation and opportunity. The structural equation modeling was used for hypotheses testing using SmartPLS 3 software.

Findings

Based on the findings, green hiring and green training and innovation have a positive and significant effect on GSCM, while both of them have no effect on environmental performance. Further, green performance management and compensation positively influenced the environmental performance but not GSCM. Furthermore, GSCM significantly and positively influenced environmental performance.

Originality/value

GHRMPs and GSCM can enhance environmental performance. Organizations should consider this interesting finding if they aim to reduce their negative environmental effect, conserve energy, prevent pollution and recycle garbage. Despite the fact that the present environment-friendly culture is still in its infancy, it adds uniqueness to this research by investigating the phenomenon's importance.

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