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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Sarah Leidner, Denise Baden and Melanie J. Ashleigh

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Green (environmental) Human Resource Management (GHRM) policies can elicit green employee behaviours. This study explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Green (environmental) Human Resource Management (GHRM) policies can elicit green employee behaviours. This study explores the role of sustainability advocates, who are leaders and managers in pursuit of their firm’s environmental agenda, in the design and delivery of GHRM policies, communication, recruitment and selection, environmental training, rewards and incentives.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, eighteen semi-structured interviews with sustainability advocates in European firms were conducted and analysed.

Findings

GHRM practices are not in themselves peripheral, intermediate or embedded, but shaped by contextual situations. Sustainability advocates’ intentions do not seem to match GHRM policy design, i.e. they try to elicit value-based behaviours by using self-interest-based approaches, leading to misalignments between the attitudes and behaviours policies attempt to elicit, and the type of behaviours they elicit in practice.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores GHRM practice implementation experienced by leaders and managers. Further research on the role of the HR function and recipients of GHRM is needed.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to be aware that organisational incentives (GHRM policies) that reflect self-interest can lead to self-interest-based behaviour and may be short-lived. A careful consideration of contextual factors will inform the selection of suitable GHRM policies. Environmental training completion rates seem an unsuitable metric for senior management bonuses.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the design and implementation stage of GHRM, leading to an identification of GHRM policies as peripheral, intermediate or embedded. This creates an in-depth knowledge on the efficacy of GHRM policies and their relation to the environment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2019

Chao-Hung Wang

Growing public concern about the natural environment is rapidly transforming the competitive landscape and forcing firms to adopt green innovation strategies. Many…

Abstract

Purpose

Growing public concern about the natural environment is rapidly transforming the competitive landscape and forcing firms to adopt green innovation strategies. Many manufacturing firms have recognized the concept of green innovation, though there has been relatively little research on considerations of its driver and effect. The purpose of this paper is to empirically develop and test a theoretical model that analyzes how organizational green culture (OGC) influences green performance and competitive advantage. Specifically, this model explains how green innovation mediates these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper collected data from 327 manufacturing firms of different industry sectors in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling with AMOS 11 software was applied to analyze the data. Data on specific environmental innovation issues at the firm level are not usually available from published sources, so this paper uses a questionnaire. The questionnaire is developed based on the literature.

Findings

The findings of this paper suggest that OGC significantly predicted green performance and competitive advantage, respectively. Moreover, the results show that both green innovation completely mediates between OGC and green performance, and that it has a partially mediating effect on the relationship between organization green culture and competitive advantage under environmental pressure.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations that point to the future lines of research. Perhaps, the biggest limitation of the study is that the data are from a single country, which may hamper generalization. This study is also limited in that it is based on cross-sectional data. A final limitation is the origin of organizational culture vs employee attitude culture.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature on organizational culture and innovation by considering green environmental concerns, which have not been empirically explored. This study also offers a unique theoretical argument describing the relationships by considering the mediating effect of green innovation strategy.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Kevin Visconti

New York is the third top wine producing state in America. Competitive wine production across the United States has challenged New York winemakers to secure a place in the…

Abstract

Purpose

New York is the third top wine producing state in America. Competitive wine production across the United States has challenged New York winemakers to secure a place in the domestic market in order to support the long-term viability of the local economy. As businesses of agriculture become increasingly disrupted by the changing natural environment and consumer demand for sustainable products grows, vintners may distinguish themselves through the production and promotion of strategic initiatives on wine bottle labels.

Design/methodology/approach

Fueled by the distinct fields of green marketing and environmental communication, this research investigates the promotion of sustainable practices on wine bottle labels. Through the methodology of content analysis, this project examines all 13 wineries on the Shawangunk Wine Trail located in the Hudson River Region of New York.

Findings

The findings from this study show that less than half of wineries in the sample selection employ environmental marketing as a communication strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This research carries practical, business and social implications for the local Hudson River Region, the larger New York wine industry, and any organization looking to remain viable in a competitive marketplace.

Originality/value

This paper reveals the potential for the Hudson River Region wine industry to promote its “distinctive” and “innovative” environmental philosophy of “terroir driven and sustainably produced” winemaking on wine bottle labels to differentiate themselves in a crowded and expanding marketplace and build a Basis of Legitimacy with consumers.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2012

Fernanda Dias Angelo, Charbel Jose Chiappetta Jabbour and Simone Vasconcellos Galina

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of the term “green/environmental innovation”, based on a systematic literature review.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of the term “green/environmental innovation”, based on a systematic literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review conducted in this research was based on papers published in ISI Web of Science and Scopus databases.

Findings

Environmental innovations are organizational implementations and changes focusing on the environment, with implications for companies’ products, manufacturing processes and marketing, with different degrees of novelty. They can be merely incremental improvements that intensify the performance of something that already exists, or radical ones that promote something completely unprecedented, where the main objective is to reduce the company's environmental impacts. In addition, environmental innovation has a bilateral relationship with the level of proactive environmental management adopted by companies. Increasing of environmental innovation tends to come up against many barriers.

Originality/value

Many researchers use the term “environmental innovation” but only a few articles present a complete definition of this concept.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Angelo Saturnino Neto, Charbel José Chiappetta Jabbour and Ana Beatriz Lopes de Sousa Jabbour

The purpose of this paper is to show results from the relationship between green/environmental training and the development of three projects of low-carbon eco-innovations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show results from the relationship between green/environmental training and the development of three projects of low-carbon eco-innovations in top Brazilian companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes three organizational projects for low-carbon eco-innovations in products (A, B and C) with the objective of reducing their impact on GHG emissions, the so-called low-carbon products. Data were collected from several sources of evidence, including in-depth interviews, document analyses and direct observations.

Findings

The authors verified that the environmental training interface for mitigating climate change is relevant for the systematic development of low-carbon products in most of the cases studied.

Originality/value

Low-carbon eco-innovations are a trend in the corporate world; however, there is not enough literature and practical evidence on this subject. Thus, this paper adds new evidence to the literature.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Yang Xu and EunHa Jeong

This study identifies an effective communication strategy for promoting restaurants’ green efforts to customers by using different types of green advertisement messages…

Abstract

Purpose

This study identifies an effective communication strategy for promoting restaurants’ green efforts to customers by using different types of green advertisement messages. This study aims to investigate the relative persuasiveness of attribute-based versus benefit-based appeal messages in green restaurant advertisements and their matching effect with different types of green practices in the restaurant (environment-focused green practices vs food-focused green practices) and with different types of restaurants (fine dining vs fast casual dining) on customers’ attitude and visiting intention toward green restaurants. Furthermore, the study examines a moderating effect of restaurant types to assess whether the matching effects between types of messages and types of green practices work differently within the different types of restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (attribute-based vs benefit-based messages) × 2 (food-focused vs environment-focused green practices) × 2 (fast casual vs fine dining restaurants) between-subject experimental design was used to test the proposed hypotheses. An online scenario-based survey was developed and distributed to online panel members in the USA. Ultimately, 363 responses were used for data analyses. ANOVA and t-test were conducted to analyze the data.

Findings

The results indicate that benefit-based messages are generally more persuasive than attribute-based messages in green restaurant advertisements. For restaurants with food-focused green practices, an advertising message emphasizing the benefit of food-focused green practices (benefit-based message) would be more effective than an advertising message describing their tangible efforts to show the greenness of the restaurant (attribute-based message). For fine dining restaurants, a green advertisement with benefit-based information would be more persuasive than attribute-based information. This study further showed that the aforementioned interaction effect between types of green practices and types of messages was salient for fine dining restaurants.

Originality/value

This research is one of the few studies in restaurant management to examine the green communication effectiveness in terms of the types of green practices and the types of advertising message framing. By comparing the relative persuasiveness of green advertisements on consumers’ attitudes and behavior intentions, this study provides suggestions for restaurant professionals to make effective green communication strategies based on the type of green practices the restaurant primarily uses and the type of restaurant the manager is operating.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Atul Kumar Sahu, Harendra Kumar Narang and Mridul Singh Rajput

The use of smart electronic gadgets is proportionately increased during last decades as these gadgets are crafting coziness and relief to the society by making their work…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of smart electronic gadgets is proportionately increased during last decades as these gadgets are crafting coziness and relief to the society by making their work easier, effective, etc. These gadgets are the need of today’s working environment for effective planning and work execution. Today, people pertaining to almost every corner of the world are addicted to smart mobile phones, and nowadays, these mobile handsets have become very essential and it is not possible to survive without using them. On the other hand, these smart mobile handsets become inefficient and obsolete over time due to which there is a need to replace the old phones by the new ones, thus creating e-waste. The purpose of this paper is to recognize the significant enablers which are responsible for replacing the existing working mobile phones with the new ones by the end consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The Grey-DEMATEL (Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory) approach is proposed by the authors to compute the decision results. The present work is supported by the structural modeling equations for supporting sustainability throughout and recognizes the most significant enablers responsible for creating e-waste by replacing the working mobile phones with the new ones.

Findings

The implication for reducing e-waste using a qualitative approach is presented by easy computation steps for collaborating green issues in the present work. The authors explained numerous enablers, which are responsible for handsets replacement by the consumers. The work can aid the companies as well as the government legislations to identify the significant enablers, drivers, factors, attributes, etc., in moving toward green environmental issue; the generation of e-waste by the obsolete existing working handsets due to non-identification of deficient enablers can be insignificant to the society.

Research limitations/implications

The implication of developed Grey-DEMATEL techniques is presented by its integration with the application field of e-waste generation by mobile handsets. The authors attempt to devise a conceptual framework linked with knowledge-based theory. The work is illustrated by the case research to understand its applicability and validity in the present scenario.

Originality/value

The authors attempt to propose a decision model, which will aid in identifying the most significant factorial condition responsible for replacing the existing mobile phones with the new ones by the end consumers. The proposed appraisement module can be used as an investigative tool to build and fabricate a planned environmental progress map for overall business considering environmental domain by the companies.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2019

Haruna Maama and Kingsley Opoku Appiah

Reporting on only the financial performance of an organisation is no longer the focus of reporting because, gradually, investors and other stakeholders demand that…

Abstract

Purpose

Reporting on only the financial performance of an organisation is no longer the focus of reporting because, gradually, investors and other stakeholders demand that companies also report on their effect on the environment and the society. Accounting and reporting for the environment has, therefore, increasingly become important to stakeholders and organisations because the effect of an organisation’s environmental and social performance on its financial health. The purpose of this study is to examine the extend of voluntary green accounting practice of companies listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange (GSE).

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on content analysis of 202 annual reports of 23 listed firms in Ghana, from 2006 to 2015.

Findings

The mining, oil and gas sector has integrated environmental sustainability information in their accounting system. With regards to the nature of green disclosure, the content analysis depicts that only positive qualitative disclosures were provided in the annual reports. Again, almost all the companies increased the quality and quantity of environmental disclosures over the years.

Practical implications

The service and manufacturing sectors should integrate environmental sustainability information in their accounting system. This, in turn, may enhance their legitimacy to access critical resources for survival.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the green and social reporting practices literature from Ghana, a sub-Sahara Africa country.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Faris ALshubiri

This paper aims to assess and empirically analyze the impact of marine production manufacturing on gross domestic product (GDP) indicators as a comparative study in Gulf…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess and empirically analyze the impact of marine production manufacturing on gross domestic product (GDP) indicators as a comparative study in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used analytical quantitative approaches to assess the impact of marine production manufacturing on GDP between GCC countries over the period from 2007 to 2015. The data were collected from Global Competitiveness Reports during 2006-2016 and from Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, FAO 2015 reports.

Findings

The results show that Saudi Arabia country has the highest production of marine while Bahrain country is the lowest in GCC. The results of ordinary least squares test show that marine production has a statistical significance on GDP indicators as Pearson correlation matrix shows a strong relationship between all variables.

Practical implications

The main conclusion is that GCC countries must adopt a regional strategy to support maritime activities, especially in the light of green environmental fluctuations. Integrated management plans are also needed to protect vital coastal ecosystems while allowing economic growth and ensuring a better quality of life for all coastal populations. Comprehensive and collaborative leadership provides effective long-term management of coastal ecosystems in the GCC. In addition, GCC countries have high competition with each other for their market share in the global export-based marine production manufacturing.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to present most wealthy GCC countries in terms of marine production manufacturing. Marine production manufacturing introduces to create a new competitive market that generates distinctive internal capabilities for survival and growth in international markets.

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Claudia A. Rademaker and Marla B. Royne

Knowledge about what drives managers to make more sustainable media decisions is important, as it can influence communication effectiveness, especially in countries with…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge about what drives managers to make more sustainable media decisions is important, as it can influence communication effectiveness, especially in countries with strong green consumption preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine corporate environmental policies and personal green attitudes of managers in the media selection process as potential influencers of marketing managers’ green thought, driving corporate sustainability.

Findings

The findings show that managers’ personal green attitudes are an internal driver of corporate sustainability with regard to more sustainable media decisions, while corporate environmental policies are not.

Practical implications

These findings highlight the importance of recruiting marketing managers with strong green personal profiles, particularly companies with a green profile. Results also suggest companies use environmental policies in all managerial decisions, including marketing communications decisions such as media selection.

Social implications

This research begins the process of understanding what drives marketing managers in their green thinking and related managerial decisions. With today’s growing focus on the environment, this knowledge is increasingly important, so companies can be aligned with the increasing number of eco-conscious consumers who purchase products based on corporate communications and green corporate decisions.

Originality/value

Where previous research found that the lack of commitment among company’s owners and the inability of suppliers to comply with the company’s sustainable policies are barriers of corporate sustainability, the current study found that this is the case even for marketing managers through the non-use of corporate green policies in marketing decisions and those with weak personal green attitudes.

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