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Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

Otávio Bartalotti, Gray Calhoun and Yang He

This chapter develops a novel bootstrap procedure to obtain robust bias-corrected confidence intervals in regression discontinuity (RD) designs. The procedure uses a wild…

Abstract

This chapter develops a novel bootstrap procedure to obtain robust bias-corrected confidence intervals in regression discontinuity (RD) designs. The procedure uses a wild bootstrap from a second-order local polynomial to estimate the bias of the local linear RD estimator; the bias is then subtracted from the original estimator. The bias-corrected estimator is then bootstrapped itself to generate valid confidence intervals (CIs). The CIs generated by this procedure are valid under conditions similar to Calonico, Cattaneo, and Titiunik’s (2014) analytical correction – that is, when the bias of the naive RD estimator would otherwise prevent valid inference. This chapter also provides simulation evidence that our method is as accurate as the analytical corrections and we demonstrate its use through a reanalysis of Ludwig and Miller’s (2007) Head Start dataset.

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Regression Discontinuity Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-390-6

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Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

Abstract

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Regression Discontinuity Designs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-390-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Richard Whipp

The work of Craig Calhoun is examined as a perspective on the operation of community structures. Three facets are considered: Calhoun's model of the pre‐industrial…

Abstract

The work of Craig Calhoun is examined as a perspective on the operation of community structures. Three facets are considered: Calhoun's model of the pre‐industrial community resting on linked multiple social relationships; parallel studies; comparisons across time and between regional or national settings. The conventional view is that national societal differences have been paramount in differentiating the long‐term profiles (e.g. economic growth) of nation states. Here the continuing importance of localised patterns of economic and social activity is emphasised.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Patricks. Calhoun and William P. Smith

The current study examined the effects of gender and motivation on negotiation strategy and outcome. It was hypothesized that findings suggesting that women obtain lower…

Abstract

The current study examined the effects of gender and motivation on negotiation strategy and outcome. It was hypothesized that findings suggesting that women obtain lower joint outcomes from integrative bargaining than men may result from women, but not men, entering negotiation settings with a high level of concern for the other's outcomes. Drawing on the dual concern model of Pruitt and his colleagues, it was predicted that situationally induced high self‐concern would result in high joint outcomes for female dyads—ay high as those for male dyads under any conditions. Male dyads were expected to require situationally‐induced self‐ and other‐concern to reach optimal joint outcomes. Where there was no situationally induced concern for either self or other, male dyads were expected to obtain higher joint outcomes than female dyads. Results from dyads bargaining in a laboratory setting were generally supportive of predictions, except that men tended to do well but for where other‐concern alone had been situationally induced. Discrepant findings are discussed in terms of the generally low level of antagonism present in these dyads.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Rania Kamla, Sonja Gallhofer and Jim Haslam

This paper adds to a focus of the social accounting literature (on perceptions and attitudes to social accounting) by seeking to offer insights into Syrian accountants'…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper adds to a focus of the social accounting literature (on perceptions and attitudes to social accounting) by seeking to offer insights into Syrian accountants' attitudes towards, and perceptions of, social accounting in Syria in the first decade of the twenty‐first century, with particular attention to its role, future development and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an analysis of interviews of Syrian accountants; contextual analysis (and an appreciation of the prior literature).

Findings

Syrian accountants' perceptions are shaped by developments in Syria's socio‐political and economic context, encompassing imperialism/colonialism, globalisation and cultural specificities, including Islam. Interviewees perceived a significant role for a social accounting – that would parallel the Western form of social accounting – in enhancing well‐being in the dynamic context. At the same time, they were reluctant to see the development and implementation of this accounting in Syria as an urgent issue, so that this social accounting might be left initially at least with an even more marginal part to play than in the West. The study suggests that a combination of forces – global developments, Western imperialism and Syria's colonial history – have had a substantively repressive rather than progressive impact on the development of social accounting in Syria vis‐à‐vis its more positive potential.

Research limitations/implications

All limitations of interview research apply. This study focuses on Syria in a context when economic transition was a major issue. Further studies of economies in transition would be of interest.

Practical implications

An awareness of how the local and the global interact in debates over social accounting can provide insights for policy makers concerned with accounting regulation.

Originality/value

The focus on Syria, a non‐Western country, enriches the social accounting literature, which focuses mainly on Western developments.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Laura Upenieks and William Magee

The malicious impulse is a phenomenon that lies in the theoretical and ontological space between emotion and action. In this chapter, we probe this space. In the empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

The malicious impulse is a phenomenon that lies in the theoretical and ontological space between emotion and action. In this chapter, we probe this space. In the empirical part of this work, we evaluate the hypothesis that middle-level supervisors will be more likely than non-supervisory workers and top-level supervisors to report an impulse to “hurt someone you work with” (i.e., maliciousness).

Methodology/approach

Data are from a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of employed Toronto residents in 2004–2005.

Findings

Results from logistic regression analyses show that when job characteristics are controlled, the estimated difference between middle-level supervisors and workers in other hierarchical positions reporting the impulse to harm a coworker is statistically significant. Moreover, the difference between middle-level supervisors and other workers persist after controls for anger about work and job-related stress.

Social Implications

In discussing our results, we focus on factors that might generate the observed associations, and on how Bourdieusian theory may be used to interpret the social patterning of impulses in general, and malicious impulses in particular. We also discuss the implications of our findings for emotional intelligence in the workplace.

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Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Rebecca L. Gardner, Ellen Calhoun and Jeanne E. Boyle

In 1990 we compiled an annotated bibliography of official state lists of endangered, threatened, and rare species. In gathering information for that bibliography, which…

Abstract

In 1990 we compiled an annotated bibliography of official state lists of endangered, threatened, and rare species. In gathering information for that bibliography, which appeared in Reference Services Review in Spring 1991, we found numerous unofficial sources of state lists, such as those developed by universities, institutes, and Natural Heritage Programs, which also provide valuable information on statuses of endangered, threatened, and rare species. A comprehensive search for unofficial lists results in this second bibliography.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 1990

Kenneth J. Calhoun and Albert L. Lederer

A key to the effective implementation of strategic plans is the communication of the strategic plans to executives in functional areas. A study of eighteen organizations…

Abstract

A key to the effective implementation of strategic plans is the communication of the strategic plans to executives in functional areas. A study of eighteen organizations revealed that their functional executives’ knowledge of the strategic plan was closely tied to their corporate planners’ assessment of the quality of the communication of the plan. In contrast, the functional executives’ knowledge was not so closely tied to the planners’ assessment of merely the quality of the business plan itself.Different organizations use different communication tactics. These tactics suggest practical actions to enable strategic planners to improve the communication of their plans.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Abstract

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Delivering Sustainable Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044022-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Bruce Ransom

Why is South Carolina resisting compliance with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993? In a case study with implications for other states challenging the…

Abstract

Why is South Carolina resisting compliance with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993? In a case study with implications for other states challenging the implementation of the motor voter law, the author frames his analysis on the basic of a conflict between nation-centered and state-centered views of American federalism. He argues that: (1) the lingering influence of a traditional political culture (for South Carolina), (2) states' rights tendencies associated with the devolution of more authority to the states in domestic policy, (3) Republican Party hegemony for strengthening the role of states in the federal system, and (4) the general objection of subnational officials to unfunded federal mandates converge to propel South Carolina and several other states (9 of 10 led by Republican governors) to seek judicial relief under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution from what they see as the national government exploiting its authority at the expense of states.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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