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1 – 10 of over 5000
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2008

Yao‐Wen Hsu, Yi‐Chan Chung, Ching‐Piao Chen and Chih‐Hung Tsai

Each amusement park has a wayfinding system, while symbols are important mediums to guide tourists to find their destinations. It is very important that whether the…

Abstract

Each amusement park has a wayfinding system, while symbols are important mediums to guide tourists to find their destinations. It is very important that whether the meanings of symbols recognized by tourists immediately. This paper mainly discusses the recognition of graphic symbols in amusement park, and proposes the improvement suggestions. Materials for this study were drawn from 20 different graphic symbols of a theme amusement park in Taiwan. The testees were required to evaluate the design of graphic symbols based on symbolic meaning and graphics recognition to summarize the confusion matrix. The results show that there are three groups of graphic symbols easy to be confused, and five symbols not meeting a criterion of 67 per cent correct responses. The reasons were discussed, and improvement and relevant suggestions have been proposed, which may be helpful to redesign of symbols.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Eliada Pampoulou and Donald R. Fuller

Graphic symbols have been used widely in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The advancement of technology in recent years has stimulated their…

Abstract

Purpose

Graphic symbols have been used widely in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The advancement of technology in recent years has stimulated their development even further, thereby providing speech-language pathologists (SLPs) a wide range of options to choose for the individuals they support. However, existing literature on graphic symbols is scant and clinicians must base their decisions almost solely on clinical judgment. This paper aims to investigate the factors SLPs consider when choosing corpuses of graphic symbols for their clients.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used that allowed multiple-choice responses. Data were analyzed and presented primarily as percentages.

Findings

Most respondents used graphic symbols with people having developmental disorders, and the corpuses of symbols they drew upon were based predominantly on availability, characteristics of the individual’s impairment or disability and intelligibility to the user and his or her communication partners. Existing policies related to graphic symbols also influence clinicians’ choices. SLPs search for support mainly from professional associations and training providers. In terms of use with technology, ready-made symbol packages for clinicians to use were found to be attractive.

Practical implications

Professional associations and institutions that focus on AAC need to provide adequate support to clinicians with a foundation based on evidence-based practice.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first research that focuses on current practices concerning the factors SLPs take into consideration when choosing the optimum graphic symbol corpus(es) for their clients.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Rajinder Koul, Melinda Corwin, Ravi Nigam and Susanne Oetzel

Individuals with severe speech and language impairment as a result of chronic severe Broca's aphasia may rely on non‐speech communication aids to augment or replace…

Abstract

Individuals with severe speech and language impairment as a result of chronic severe Broca's aphasia may rely on non‐speech communication aids to augment or replace speech. These aids include speech‐generating devices and graphic symbol software programs that produce synthetic speech upon activation. Previous research has indicated that individuals with chronic severe Broca's aphasia are able to identify, manipulate, and combine graphic symbols to produce simple phrases and sentences. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of three individuals with chronic severe Broca's aphasia to produce graphic symbol sentences of varying levels of complexity using a speech generating device. A single‐subject multiple‐baseline design across behaviours replicated across three participants was used to assess the effect of AAC intervention on the production of sentences using graphic symbols. Findings indicated that individuals with chronic severe Broca's aphasia were able to combine graphic symbols to produce sentences of varying levels of complexity. The results of this study suggest that technologically‐based AAC intervention approaches can be effective in facilitating communication for individuals with chronic severe Broca's aphasia. The overall findings are discussed in terms of clinical and public policy implications.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Eliada Pampoulou

Graphic symbols, such as the Picture Communication Symbols, Makaton and Widgit, have been traditionally used in the field of augmentative and alternative communication…

Abstract

Purpose

Graphic symbols, such as the Picture Communication Symbols, Makaton and Widgit, have been traditionally used in the field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in order to support people with little or no functional speech. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

However, given the fact that the terminology remains contested in the existing literature as well as the multidisciplinary nature surrounding graphic symbols, in more recent years and the number of terms used in different fields, it is vital that the terminology of graphic symbols is revisited again.

Findings

In the last section of the paper, a definition of graphic symbols is proposed.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in the fact that while field of graphic symbols have been used in the AAC for more than 30 years, there is still no consensus regarding the meaning of the terminology used.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

John L. Crawford

Describes how the huge problems of managing a largetelecommunications network have been addressed in the development of aproprietary system called NETWORKS. Discusses the…

Abstract

Describes how the huge problems of managing a large telecommunications network have been addressed in the development of a proprietary system called NETWORKS. Discusses the user′s mental model. Describes a network object model. Presents examples of how object‐oriented graphics can be applied to network management tasks.

Details

Office Technology and People, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0167-5710

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Stefan Strohmeier and Felix Gross

The paper proposes the development of a graphical architecture description language (ADL) that allows a better understanding of software architectures for nontechnical…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper proposes the development of a graphical architecture description language (ADL) that allows a better understanding of software architectures for nontechnical actors and purposes and, beyond, can serve as a communication tool between domain experts and IT experts, for instance, in a software development process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows the methods and guidelines of design science research. By deriving characteristics and general requirements for ADLs from a research literature review and from industry standards, the paper provides a conceptual modeling approach for an ADL. The model design is based on typical requirements and suggestions derived from literature and related work. The application possibilities and advantages are then demonstrated with a usage scenario.

Findings

The paper elaborates a user-oriented ADL that makes software architecture comprehensible for stakeholders and end users. It provides a high level of abstraction and, thus, is not restricted to a particular domain. The paper also provides a corresponding modeling editor as well as an underlying catalogue with symbols and rules for the ADL.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a conceptual study, the ADL has not been practically evaluated yet. Thus, the usefulness of this academic approach for the industry remains to be validated.

Originality/value

The elaborated ADL can serve as a language to visualize software architectures, particularly in the business domain, in a comprehensible manner. Still, it retains the structured character of ADLs to facilitate communication on an IT-near level. In including nontechnical actors, the approach broadens the overall application capabilities of ADLs.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2007

Malcolm R. Pattinson and Grantley Anderson

The aim of this paper is, first, to discuss how the risk perceptions of computer end‐users may be influenced by improving the process of risk communication by embedding…

1935

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is, first, to discuss how the risk perceptions of computer end‐users may be influenced by improving the process of risk communication by embedding symbols and graphics within information security messages. The second aim is to describe some pilot study research that the authors have conducted in an attempt to ascertain whether the embedding of symbols and graphics within information security messages achieves a shift in the risk perceptions of computer end‐users.

Design/methodology/approach

Two pilot studies were undertaken. The objective of each study was to establish whether the embedding of a relevant graphic relating to some known aspect of information security, when placed inside an information security message, would have any influence on the information security risk perceptions of any individual to whom the message was being communicated. In both studies, the method of eliciting a response from each participant involved the use of a type of semantic differential (SD) grid.

Findings

On completing an analysis of the responses to the SD grid survey for both studies, no statistically significant differences were detected between the groups with respect to any of the six relevant scales. Nevertheless, it seems that the differences were large enough for the present authors to be convinced that the SD measures used are an appropriate survey technique for future studies in a workplace environment.

Research limitations/implications

The research subjects (i.e. survey participants) for both pilot studies were students of the University of South Australia. There are many ways in which information risk communication could be made more effective and this paper only attempts to show how graphics and symbols could be used to convey risk messages more effectively. This paper does not in any way attempt to provide any “silver‐bullet” solutions for management in terms of what they can do towards managing information risk.

Practical implications

The ultimate objective of this research is to subsequently advise management on how they can communicate information risk simply and more effectively to achieve the final outcome, i.e. the mitigation of actual risks.

Originality/value

It is believed that, if the effectiveness of the various forms of risk communication within an organisation can be increased, then the general perception of the risks to the information systems will be more realistic.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Stephen Fox

The purpose of this paper is to inform information and communication design for multi‐disciplinary multi‐national projects through the presentation of examples and…

1265

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform information and communication design for multi‐disciplinary multi‐national projects through the presentation of examples and recommendations based on lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiences from action research involving field study with 20 organizations, together with survey research involving 30 external experts.

Findings

Shared understanding in multi‐disciplinary multi‐national projects can be better enabled through the application of information and communication design.

Research limitations/implications

The action research involved only two cases.

Practical implications

Project participants need to have shared understandings in order to achieve project objectives. There are formidable inherent barriers to shared understanding in multi‐disciplinary multi‐national projects. Generic methods for the communication of information; such as use of gestures, speaking business English, and application of standard process charting; can be ineffective. Particularly, when inherent challenges are exacerbated by the introduction of new technological and/or business concepts. Information design seeks to improve the effectiveness of information. Communication design is concerned with the selection of media most suitable for carrying particular information to specific audiences/recipients.

Originality/value

The originality of the research reported in this paper is that it encompasses: inherent challenges in establishing shared understanding; limitations of generic methods for the communication of information; issues underlying information and communication design; as well as two cases of multi‐disciplinary multi‐national projects. The value of this paper is that it includes practical examples to inform information and communication design by personnel in project businesses. Further, practical recommendations for reducing time and cost are provided. Furthermore, these practical recommendations are related to the challenges highlighted by established theory.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Information Services for Innovative Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12465-030-5

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Victoria Magrath and Helen McCormick

Literature concerning branding elements is vast yet sporadic. Whilst many academics focus on one or a number of branding design elements, none have yet designed a holistic…

13057

Abstract

Purpose

Literature concerning branding elements is vast yet sporadic. Whilst many academics focus on one or a number of branding design elements, none have yet designed a holistic framework to demonstrate the variety of alternatives. The purpose of this paper is to identify the branding design elements within online fashion web sites and propose how they may be utilised within the design of mobile applications. An academic or practitioner must outline a taxonomy of branding elements before they can begin to empirically test their effects. It cannot be assumed that the online consumer is the same as the mobile consumer, and therefore research into how to design successful mobile fashion applications is essential.

Design/methodology/approach

Branding design elements are extracted from branding literature and described in the context of online and mobile utilisation. The elements are demonstrated within a holistic framework of m‐branding design elements presented for both commercial and academic appreciation. Research implications and future research avenues are additionally explored.

Findings

The paper identifies 11 m‐branding design elements classified within four key categories relating to their purpose and consistency to the brand identity.

Originality/value

Literature concerning the design of fashion mobile applications is scarce. With expectations of smart phone figures reaching 1.7 billion by 2013, it is the most lucrative time to be researching how the design of the mobile application might affect the behaviours of the mobile consumer. This paper is a first step in providing information as to the m‐branding elements available for utilisation within a fashion brand's mobile strategy.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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