Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Mary Jane Heaney

Provides a comprehensive review of the significance attributed to the usefulness, practicality and appropriateness of graphic novels in the school library media center…

3695

Abstract

Purpose

Provides a comprehensive review of the significance attributed to the usefulness, practicality and appropriateness of graphic novels in the school library media center with specific implications for collection development.

Design/methodology/approach

A careful review of recent literature provides the school media specialist with an overview of graphic novels including definitions, challenges, benefits, helpful resources, curricular connections and collection development issues. The sources reflect the recent trends in the increasing popularity of graphic novels and their use and benefit in school media centers.

Findings

Presents information on the definitions of graphic novels and the challenges and benefits specific to the school media center. Notes that while challenges exist, the benefits of including graphic novels in the school library media center are many, including engaging reluctant readers. Offers practical information for collection development and provides useful sources that serve many purposes.

Practical implications

Offers background information for the school library media specialist about graphic novels. Includes advice and practical strategies for building a graphic novel collection in the school media center.

Originality/value

This paper reflects recent trends toward increased interest in graphic novels and offers the school media specialist practical advice on how to best meet that growing interest by including graphic novels in the school media center.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Kari Bosma, Audrey C. Rule and Karla S. Krueger

Graphic novels can contribute to effective content area reading on social studies topics such as the American Revolution. This action research study’s purpose was to…

Abstract

Graphic novels can contribute to effective content area reading on social studies topics such as the American Revolution. This action research study’s purpose was to examine student recall of facts, enjoyment of reading, and interest in the topic when using graphic novels as compared to illustrated nonfiction prose in social studies content area reading. Twenty-two fifth grade students (13 females, 9 males) in a public school in a Midwestern state participated in the study. Half of the students read about the Boston Massacre and Patrick Henry through graphic novels and read about Paul Revere and the Boston Tea Party with illustrated nonfiction texts, with the other half doing the opposite. The mean number of correct ideas recalled by students two weeks after reading two books in the graphic novel condition was 8.6 compared to 7.1 for the nonfiction prose condition with a medium effect size. Students rated their reading enjoyment significantly higher in the graphic novel condition indicating that graphic novels should be employed more often into the school curriculum. Suggestions for integrating graphic novels into the curriculum are provided along with other ways to take action.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2014

J. Spencer Clark

The use of six non-fiction graphic novels to teach historical agency in a social studies methods course was examined in a critical action research study. Pre-service…

Abstract

The use of six non-fiction graphic novels to teach historical agency in a social studies methods course was examined in a critical action research study. Pre-service social studies teachers were asked to read one graphic novel and to discuss it with classmates, first in literature circles, then as a whole class. Data revealed graphic novels engaged pre-service teachers in thinking about historical agency, and helped them make connections between historical agency and their own agency. There were three overlapping ways pre-service teachers connected to historical agency in all six graphic novels: upbringing and personal experience, unpredictability of historical situations, and injustice. The findings highlight the value of graphic novels for teaching about historical agency in social studies courses because of their focus on historical agents’ positionality.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Mark R. Bailon

We need a locally relevant curriculum because it is engaging and leverages community knowledge strengths. However, new teachers are not always aware of the resources…

Abstract

We need a locally relevant curriculum because it is engaging and leverages community knowledge strengths. However, new teachers are not always aware of the resources available to make a locally relevant curriculum. Here in New Mexico, Los Alamos is a location with many resources detailing its purpose and existence. These resources coupled with so much notoriety inside and outside the state make Los Alamos a place that lends itself to culturally relevant instruction. Specifically, graphic novels provide a unique medium for students and teachers alike to start learning about the city that started the Atomic Age: Los Alamos and begin applying that knowledge more broadly. I, being a student and a teacher from New Mexico, offer my own understanding of a locally relevant curriculum utilizing three graphic novels about Los Alamos, its people, and its stories.

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Liorah Golomb

The purpose of this paper is to encourage and assist collection of adult‐level, graphic novels and book‐length comics by women, and to demonstrate the breadth and depth of…

2353

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to encourage and assist collection of adult‐level, graphic novels and book‐length comics by women, and to demonstrate the breadth and depth of such work.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a brief history of women and independent comics, tracing the medium's development from the 1970s underground comix movement to the present day. Individual creators and their works are discussed.

Findings

In the early years of independent comics, many of the women creating them were consciously reacting to an overwhelmingly male‐dominated profession. There was a high degree of shock value in these early works. As time went on the comics still tended towards the autobiographical, but storytelling gained importance. Most of the women creating comics today are still doing so from a woman's point of view, but their target audience seems more universal.

Originality/value

Graphic novels are in increasing demand, both for scholarly and leisure reading. Guides to collecting graphic novels exist; however, the vast majority of the artists included in these guides are men. This paper fills a gap by introducing librarians to several women graphic novelists who have been overlooked thus far.

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Ken Irwin

This bibliographic essay examines the scope and variety of nonfiction works in comics form with the intent of expanding librarians’ awareness of the diversity of such…

1081

Abstract

Purpose

This bibliographic essay examines the scope and variety of nonfiction works in comics form with the intent of expanding librarians’ awareness of the diversity of such materials and serving as a resource for librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

It provides some theoretical background for understanding what constitutes nonfiction in graphic form and an overview of works available in print.

Findings

The article provides a representative (but not comprehensive) survey of graphic nonfiction works in the genres of memoir, travel, journalism, history, biography, science, essays and educational materials.

Research limitations/implications

The essay focuses on materials published in books in English; the library world would benefit from subsequent research exploring the richness of materials available in other formats and other languages.

Originality/value

The field of graphic nonfiction is expanding, and this article serves as a guide for libraries interested in building or expanding collections in this format.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Bethany Latham

176

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Xiang Ren and Lucy Montgomery

The internet is transforming possibilities for creative interaction, experimentation and cultural consumption in China and raising important questions about the role that…

1256

Abstract

Purpose

The internet is transforming possibilities for creative interaction, experimentation and cultural consumption in China and raising important questions about the role that “publishers” might play in an open and networked digital world. The purpose of this paper is to consider the role that copyright is playing in the growth of a publishing industry that is being “born digital”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper approaches online literature as an example of a creative industry that is generating value for a wider creative economy through its social network market functions. It builds on the social network market definition of the creative industries proposed by Potts et al. and uses this definition to interrogate the role that copyright plays in a rapidly‐evolving creative economy.

Findings

The rapid growth of a market for crowd‐sourced content is combining with growing commercial freedom in cultural space to produce a dynamic landscape of business model experimentation. Using the social web to engage audiences, generate content, establish popularity and build reputation and then converting those assets into profit through less networked channels appears to be a driving strategy in the expansion of wider creative industries markets in China.

Originality/value

At a moment when publishing industries all over the world are struggling to come to terms with digital technology, the emergence of a rapidly‐growing area of publishing that is being born digital offers important clues about the future of publishing and what social network markets might mean for the role of copyright in a digital age.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2016

Stephanie Schneider

This article examines the use of alternative texts to represent the Holocaust and to teach secondary students about this event. An alternative text is anything other than…

Abstract

This article examines the use of alternative texts to represent the Holocaust and to teach secondary students about this event. An alternative text is anything other than a traditional textbook. Alternate texts may include poetry, novels, graphic novels, films, or plays. By using alternative texts, teachers can engage students in multiple perspectives to stimulate critical thinking in their classrooms. Alternative texts, furthermore, can shift the paradigm of how teachers and students think about morally and ethically complex subjects. In order to facilitate such a shift, teachers, scholars, and students should view different ways of representing difficult subjects in the classroom. The Holocaust is a difficult subject to teach due to the scale of moral issues and scope of this crime against humanity. Traditional means of teaching the Holocaust, using maps, textbooks, and primary source documents are important but fail to create changes in students perspectives because there is little space for students to become more empathetic and apply history to current world events. Providing students with texts including narratives, poetry, and first-person accounts can add humanity into what some view as one of the most inhumane events in history and thus shift the paradigm for high school students.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Linda Ashcroft

The purpose of this paper is to provide a flavour of the content of the American Library Association Annual Conference held in Washington DC in June 2010.

304

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a flavour of the content of the American Library Association Annual Conference held in Washington DC in June 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an outline description of the issues, content, networking, speakers and participants at this conference.

Findings

This major conference covered many topical issues and themes, latest trends and research and leading edge technology applicable to librarians and information professionals internationally. It facilitated many networking opportunities.

Originality/value

This represents a conference report of value to librarians and information professionals, as the variety of themes applies to the various aspects of library and information work.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000