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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Cheri D. Logan

This paper investigates the specialist learning undertaken in graphic design classrooms and its relationship to industry practices. It considers how well students are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the specialist learning undertaken in graphic design classrooms and its relationship to industry practices. It considers how well students are prepared for work and the nature of this vocational preparation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an empirical study using a qualitative, case study approach. A situated perspective on design learning and knowledge was adopted, and a strong focus on studio discourse developed. An analytical method based on respondents' use of metaphor in practice‐oriented discourse evolved, providing an interpretive framework for the study.

Findings

The paper describes the difficulties involved in undertaking research into design classrooms, outlining how these were resolved to allow the unique learning activities of the design practicum to be identified. It discusses the lack of recognition of design pedagogies, and considers their characteristic strengths and weaknesses. Key metaphorical discourses structuring design learning, teaching and practice are identified. Shared discourses in use across graphic design education and industry suggest the alignment of these contexts, providing a perspective on them as overlapping “circles of practice”. Conclusions are drawn about the effectiveness of graphic design vocational education.

Originality/value

The study suggests a means of researching practice‐oriented discourses and activities across a range of settings. It offers ways of considering the alignment of educational and professional contexts by using a modified “situated” perspective on learning. This perspective allows for recognition of types of learning that do not meet traditional, “academic” criteria and of the vocationally‐referenced pedagogies that promote them.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Edward J. McCaughan

This paper presents a comparative analysis of artwork produced in the context of social movements waged by Mexicans and Chicanos (U.S. inhabitants of Mexican descent…

Abstract

This paper presents a comparative analysis of artwork produced in the context of social movements waged by Mexicans and Chicanos (U.S. inhabitants of Mexican descent) during the two decades between the mid-1960s and the mid-1980s. Despite the fact that activists in these movements shared many elements of Mexican culture and history, were part of the same generation of radical social movements born in the 1960s, and experienced some significant interchange among movement participants from each side of the U.S.-Mexico border, an examination of movement art reveals significant differences in key elements of the movements’ collective identity and expression of political citizenship. Analysis of the artwork also highlights different aesthetic choices made by movement artists, particularly with regard to the deployment of formal elements associated with the “Mexican School” of art made famous by artists associated with the Mexican Revolution of the early 20th century. Variations in the representational strategies developed by movement artists reflect the distinct relationship of movement constituents in Mexico and the U.S. to each nation's prevailing regimes of accumulation and modes of regulation. The analysis is based on an examination of 374 pieces of art.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1318-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Eleanor S. Block

While the spread of mass media culture in the United States has often been measured in terms of the number of television sets in each home, the camera and the photograph…

Abstract

While the spread of mass media culture in the United States has often been measured in terms of the number of television sets in each home, the camera and the photograph have been almost as pervasive. Once the province of the professional photograher or the special studio, cameras of the same type are found today in all but a very few homes in the United States. Even rarer would be a home without its collection of photographs to record the family's events, joys, triumphs and tragedies as well as the everyday mundane record of events.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1977

Elizabeth B. Pollard

Art publishing this year has been as bountiful as ever, and the scholars who provide art reference sources have been even more creative than usual. While art librarians…

Abstract

Art publishing this year has been as bountiful as ever, and the scholars who provide art reference sources have been even more creative than usual. While art librarians have at times been swamped by an embarrassment of riches, certain sources and some art publishers have been conspicuously consistent in providing the most systematic, most current reference works.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Liorah Golomb

The purpose of this paper is to encourage and assist collection of adult‐level, graphic novels and book‐length comics by women, and to demonstrate the breadth and depth of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to encourage and assist collection of adult‐level, graphic novels and book‐length comics by women, and to demonstrate the breadth and depth of such work.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a brief history of women and independent comics, tracing the medium's development from the 1970s underground comix movement to the present day. Individual creators and their works are discussed.

Findings

In the early years of independent comics, many of the women creating them were consciously reacting to an overwhelmingly male‐dominated profession. There was a high degree of shock value in these early works. As time went on the comics still tended towards the autobiographical, but storytelling gained importance. Most of the women creating comics today are still doing so from a woman's point of view, but their target audience seems more universal.

Originality/value

Graphic novels are in increasing demand, both for scholarly and leisure reading. Guides to collecting graphic novels exist; however, the vast majority of the artists included in these guides are men. This paper fills a gap by introducing librarians to several women graphic novelists who have been overlooked thus far.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Simona De Iulio and Carlo Vinti

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the Americanization of European advertising in the post‐war years as a phenomenon of cultural transfer and it aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the Americanization of European advertising in the post‐war years as a phenomenon of cultural transfer and it aims to explore the interaction between the USA and Italian advertising traditions during the 1950s and the 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is in two parts. First, the role of those cross‐cultural mediators who contributed to changing marketing communication strategies of many Italian companies during the 1950s and the 1960s is studied. Second, the ways in which US advertising rules and patterns are combined with the local tradition in order to fit the Italian context of the post‐war years are looked at. The research is based on a study of the main USA and Italian marketing and advertising literature of the post‐war years, and on an analysis of press campaigns and TV commercials.

Findings

This research shows that during the 1950s and the 1960s, the conflict between the American approach and the Italian approach to advertising did not prevent interaction and negotiation. In the post‐war years, the USA know‐how and practices, are re‐interpreted through the process of transfer to Italy, creating original, and unexpected solutions.

Originality/value

Although some research has been conducted on the Italian advertising scene during the post‐World War II years, the few existing contributions did not focus on the interaction between the imported American model and the local traditions. This paper provides a good overview of the ways in which notions, methodologies, and strategies coming from the USA are implemented.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1913

IN all probability it will not cheer the heart of the librarian to know that 1912 has been a record year in British publishing. Nevertheless the “Analysis of books…

Abstract

IN all probability it will not cheer the heart of the librarian to know that 1912 has been a record year in British publishing. Nevertheless the “Analysis of books published in 1912,” appearing in The Publishers' Circular, gives many facts that are both interesting and informative. During the year 12,067 books were published, an increase of 1,153 on the figure for 1911 (the previous highest). The totals for the various classes of literature are set forth in a table arranged according to the recommendations of the International Congress of Librarians at Brussels in 1910, and each class is sub‐divided into “new books,” “translations,” pamphlets,” and “new editions.” The totals for the various classes are as follows:—

Details

New Library World, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Thomas Mejtoft

For several hundreds of years printing has been the only effective channel for spreading mass communication. During the 1900s several new media channels have been invented…

Abstract

For several hundreds of years printing has been the only effective channel for spreading mass communication. During the 1900s several new media channels have been invented and, with the addition of the Internet, this has both changed the way media is consumed and has increased the competition between different channels. This qualitative case study of 37 firms reports on how relationships are used in the printing industry to relieve some of the impact of the competitive forces from new, and easily accessible, media as a means for marketing and, furthermore, on the impact on the printing industry as an industry. The results from the case study show that there are both internal and external effects of forming relationships and those vertical, as well as horizontal, relationships are of great importance to create a sustainable competitive situation for the printing industry. Relationships are used to increase both the strategic flexibility of the firm and the flexibility of the print media channel. Furthermore, the study illustrates that the printing industry, and print as a medium of communication, is drifting gradually away from the actual customer due to the new paradigm of value creation.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Michelle O. Fletcher Claville, Sainath Babu, Brandon C. Parker, Emorcia V. Hill, Eric W. Claville and Michelle Penn-Marshall

The Nanoscience Project at Hampton University (NanoHU) responds to the international call for more workers in the field of science, technology, engineering, and…

Abstract

The Nanoscience Project at Hampton University (NanoHU) responds to the international call for more workers in the field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) who are nano-savvy and prepared for engagement in the fourth industrial revolution. The project’s initial intent to answer statewide and national initiatives was congruent with Hampton University’s (HU) desire for increased diversification of research interests across HU and enhanced the preparation of its students for doctoral degrees. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the five-year project (2012–2017) purposed to develop and systematically implement an integrated, multidisciplinary STEM research and education program in nanoscience at HU. Evidence of NanoHU’s success is demonstrated in the following accomplishments at the University: (1) a new Nanoscience Minor, (2) a new “Introduction to Nanoscience” course that has had a total enrollment of 82 students from STEM and non-STEM fields, (3) the NanoHU Scholars Program that has prepared 23 Scholars for entry into graduate programs and 12 NanoHU Fellows for similar pursuits, (4) a Faculty Development Program that has supported a total of 20 STEM and non-STEM faculty members, (5) a NanoHU Seminar Series that has informed the HU community about the science, business, legal, and ethical topics pertaining to nanoscience and nanotechnology, and (6) a viable outreach program that has prepared high school students (NanoHU Pioneers) for successful matriculation as STEM majors at the college level and stimulated STEM interest in the surrounding community. It is worth emphasizing that execution of the project also resulted in engagement between STEM and non-STEM constituents of the University, establishing a platform for a formal science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) institutional initiative. Efforts to communicate the importance of nanoscience to the HU community through seminars resulted in an infusion of nanoscience modules in STEM and non-STEM courses including courses in English, Journalism, Ethics, and other pre-law courses. Although NanoHU is specific to the needs of HU, its collaborative construct promises to be an innovative model for STEM and STEAM programs at other institutions with a similar construct.

Details

Broadening Participation in STEM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-908-9

Keywords

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