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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Grant Battersby

Grape types grown in Australia have changed as a reflection of changes in consumers' tastes. Theres have been major changes in the Australian wine market in recent…

Abstract

Grape types grown in Australia have changed as a reflection of changes in consumers' tastes. Theres have been major changes in the Australian wine market in recent decades. The proportion of fortified wines has fallen from 81 per cent to ten percent of production and the popularity of different types of wine has varied. This has led to rapid changes in the types of grapes planted. The pattern of grape type use from 1972–91 at a small, long‐established winery gives a perspective on the general market trends. This winery adapted its use of particular grape types more quickly than the national average and has now established a pattern reflecting its expertise with fortified and red wines and regional characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Virva Tuomala and David B. Grant

Access to food through retail supply chain distribution can vary significantly among the urban poor and leads to household food insecurity. The paper explores this…

Abstract

Purpose

Access to food through retail supply chain distribution can vary significantly among the urban poor and leads to household food insecurity. The paper explores this sustainable supply chain phenomenon through a field study among South Africa's urban poor.

Design/methodology/approach

Urban metabolic flows is the theoretical basis in the context of supply chain management (SCM). The field study comprised 59 semi-structured interviews in one South African township. Data were recorded, transcribed and translated, and coded using NVivo 12 to provide an inventory of eight themes categorized and patterned from the analysis.

Findings

Findings indicate societal factors play a significant role affecting food distribution, access and security from a spatial perspective of retail outlet locations and a nutritional standpoint regarding quality and quantity of food.

Research limitations/implications

The study is exploratory in one township, and while rigorously conducted, the generalizability of findings is limited to this context.

Practical implications

The study practically contributes by providing guidance for food retailers and policymakers to include nutritional guidelines in their distribution planning, as well as the dynamics of diverse neighbourhoods that exist in modern urban contexts.

Social implications

New forms of retail food distribution can provide better security and access to food for the urban poor, contributing to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 2 Zero Hunger and 11 Liveable Cities.

Originality/value

The study is interdisciplinary and contributes by linking UN SDGs and SCM through urban metabolic flows from development studies as an overarching framework to enable analysis of relationships between physical, social and economic factors in the urban environment.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1905

Referring to the question of the adulteration of brandy with silent spirit, the Standard recently observed that the question of obtaining, by legislation or otherwise, an…

Abstract

Referring to the question of the adulteration of brandy with silent spirit, the Standard recently observed that the question of obtaining, by legislation or otherwise, an improvement in the present system of public control over the purity of articles of food and drink has become one of great and even national importance. Many of the grosser kinds of adulteration, against which the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts were originally directed, are of far less frequent occurrence, but in their place has arisen a great variety of more subtle forms of adulteration, frequently very harmful, and always objectionable on account of the misrepresentation that the sophisticated article is the genuine product which the purchaser has asked for and has a right to expect. With adulteration of this kind the local authorities, whose business it is to enforce the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts, are often unable to deal satisfactorily, and this fact has been insisted upon by many scientific authorities who have interested themselves in the subject. The position of affairs with regard to spirits typifies the difficulty which constantly arises in connection with a large variety of articles of food and drink of both home and foreign manufacture. It is obvious that when cases relating to the additions of “preservative” chemicals to milk and butter, of glucose to marmalade, or the proportion of “esters” in a brandy, come before different magistrates, supported by a mass of conflicting evidence on both sides, the justices cannot be expected to come to consistent or satisfactory conclusions. Government policy in the matter seems so far to have been confined to appointing a series of committees or commissions, and afterwards doing nothing, or next to nothing, with their reports.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Barrie Gunter

Abstract

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Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Ilona E. De Hooge and Ynte K. van Dam

As one of the five concrete actions recommended for implementing sustainable development at universities (internal operations, institutional framework, research, education…

Abstract

Purpose

As one of the five concrete actions recommended for implementing sustainable development at universities (internal operations, institutional framework, research, education and capacity building), capacity building has received the least research attention. Although capacity building can be a tangible implementation of outreach that offers empowerment to universities, it is currently unclear how capacity building can be operationalised in concrete activities and which parties represent the university and the community. The purpose of this study is to provide the idea that capacity building can be organised through student training projects.

Design/methodology/approach

To provide support for our suggestion that student training projects can act as an implementation method for capacity building, an illustrative case study is presented. The case study concerns an academic consultancy training project for students in the domain of sustainable development.

Findings

The case study analysis reveals that, as an implementation method, student training projects can provide benefits for both universities and communities. It appears that student training projects do not depend on individual engagement, on individual university staff members or on research grants and that they provide community members with access to resources, expertise and experiences of academics. Moreover, student training projects overcome the major challenges of both power distance and continuity.

Originality/value

To summarise, student training projects may provide a new, promising avenue as an implementation method for capacity building that provides substantial benefits and overcomes the challenges of other methods mentioned in the existing literature.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1966

THE country is condemned to a new economic dispensation as full of difficulties as a hedgehog is of spines, and in general just as prickly. Time's crucible will resolve…

Abstract

THE country is condemned to a new economic dispensation as full of difficulties as a hedgehog is of spines, and in general just as prickly. Time's crucible will resolve some of them but there are others for which such protracted recuperation is too slow.

Details

Work Study, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1950

The Right Hon. Earl De La Warr, P.C., J.P., in his inaugural address to the Congress, expressed his appreciation at being elected President for the ensuing year. He…

Abstract

The Right Hon. Earl De La Warr, P.C., J.P., in his inaugural address to the Congress, expressed his appreciation at being elected President for the ensuing year. He continued : “ Your task, whether you be members or officers of local authorities or members of other professions, is to prevent sickness and disease, rather than to cure it, or, rather, I should put it more positively by saying that you give us the conditions which we need for living healthily. . . . As an agriculturist I cannot but notice your interest in both farming and veterinary problems. You have given time to them in your discussion programme and also in the arrangements that you have made for visiting neighbouring farms. Three years ago I set myself the task of having an all tuberculin tested estate and I am proud to tell you that three‐quarters of my tenants have already achieved that happy state of affairs. Perhaps you will allow me to mention one point here. The cleaning up of our dairy herds and of our milk supplies is of first‐rate importance in any scheme for improving the national health. I hope that in your travels round you will see something of the progress that has been made in clean milk production. The proportion of milk produced on T.T. farms is increasing; this is shown by the fact that the percentage was 18?4 in 1947, 22?2 in 1948 and 25?9 in 1949. It has risen by over 100 million gallons even during the last statistical year, and the first six months of this year look like giving us an almost equally large increase. The inspection of cowsheds has now become the responsibility of the Ministry of Agriculture, but you can still help to encourage clean milk production by your influence on the distributive and consumer side. Not all consumers, by any means, realise the significance of designated milk. You could give them guidance. It is very important also that farmers and landowners should feel that you are their friends and that you consider their efforts to improve this milk to be worth while. If the impression was ever given that doctors and public health authorities rely so much on pasteurisation that it does not really matter very much what sort of milk is produced, great harm might be done. The decision to enter the T.T. scheme involves quite a considerable risk of cows failing in the test, and a considerable initial expenditure of both effort and money. Nobody is ever the worse off for a bit of encouragement, and if you feel able to give it, so much the better for us all. Certainly I for one have a possibly old‐fashioned feeling that, pasteurised or not, I should prefer my milk to start its life clean, all the more so in view of the fact that by no means every pasteurising plant is completely infallible and independent of the care with which human beings operate it. . . . I close by offering you the consolation of not being very much in the news, of not receiving the thanks or gratitude that is due to all the services that you administer, for the sound and simple reason that you are doing them too well to attract attention.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 52 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Kath Woodward and Sophie Woodward

This article aims to develop the methodological and intellectual approach taken in the authors' co‐authored book to explore the synergies and disconnections in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to develop the methodological and intellectual approach taken in the authors' co‐authored book to explore the synergies and disconnections in the experience of being in the academy at different historical moments using the inter‐relationship between different feminisms in the context of the authors' lived experiences as a mother and daughter whose experience of the academy has crossed second‐wave feminism into third wave. There have been significant demographic, cultural and legislative shifts, but the authors' conversations demonstrate the endurance of imbalances of power and the continuing need for a feminist politics of difference which can engage with contemporary life in the academy.

Design/methodology/approach

This is primarily a theoretical paper that adopts feminist approaches to reflection and dialogue. The article is designed to bring together lived experience across generations, feminist theories and methodologies and the implications for activism. The paper uses the device of “I‐Kath I‐Sophie” as part of an autoethnographic approach to the cross‐generational conversation.

Findings

Far from being redundant, the authors argue that feminist critiques of inequalities that are often manifest in women's invisibility and silence even in the academy in the twenty‐first century – there is still the need to support a politics of difference and to explore ways of giving women a voice. The persistence of inequalities means that feminist battles have not been entirely won. The authors argue for dialogue between the feminisms of mothers and daughters.

Research limitations/implications

Feminist concepts and arguments from what has been called the “second wave” are still useful, especially in relation to maintaining the category woman as a speaking subject who can engage in collective action.

Practical implications

The authors' arguments support the continuation of spaces for women to share experience within the academy, for example in feminist reading groups and through women's networks.

Social implications

Feminist theories and activism remain important political forces for women in the academy today and post feminism is a questionable conceptualisation and phenomenon. In times when feminist battles may seem to have been won there remain issues to explore in relation to a new problem with no name.

Originality/value

The article is original in its authorship, methodological approach to a conversation that crosses experience and theoretical frameworks across generations and in its support for a twenty‐first century politics of difference.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1950

During the past few years the British Food Journal has reported a great many prosecutions under the Food and Drugs Act in respect of “ foreign bodies ” in food. Examples…

Abstract

During the past few years the British Food Journal has reported a great many prosecutions under the Food and Drugs Act in respect of “ foreign bodies ” in food. Examples have been cigarette ends and pieces of metal or wood in bread, rat dirt and mouse dirt in cereals, nails or small pieces of metal in sausages, splinters of glass in milk, and a host of similar instances. Some of the prosecutions have been for selling food unfit for human consumption, but many have been for selling food not of the substance demanded. I confess that I have always had some doubt whether a loaf is entirely unfit for human use merely because it contains a clean piece of metal quite easily seen and removed. Still, justices never seem to have any difficulty in convicting the vendor under one Section or another. The older readers of the British Food Journal will remember that until the Act of 1938 came into force it was impossible to institute proceedings under the “ prejudice to the purchaser ” Section unless there was a Public Analyst's certificate. I laboured for many years to get this restriction eliminated. First, I was able to persuade my colleagues on the Departmental Committee on the Composition and Description of Food (which reported in 1934) to make a recommendation in that direction, although it was rather doubtful whether it fell within the terms of reference. Then, contrary to the strong representations of the Society of Public Analysts, but with the approval of the Ministry of Health, I persuaded the Joint Committee of Lords and Commons on the Bill of 1938 to enact that a Sampling Officer should be entitled at his discretion to submit or not to submit a sample for analysis. What I had in mind was this: first, that it was sheer waste of time and money to consult an Analyst when an offence could be quite effectively proved without an analysis. Secondly, a wide range of cases in which what was sold was not of the nature demanded could be better proved by an Inspector or by trade evidence than by analysis in a chemical laboratory. Examples particularly in my mind were the substitution of haddock for hake, witches for lemon soles, sheep's liver for calves' liver, the sale of foreign produce as home‐grown, the sale of apples, plums and other fruit of different kinds from those under whose names they were sold, the sale of margarine for butter when the facts were admitted by the vendor, the improper description of wines which could better be proved by skilled tasters than by analysts, and, of course, though to a minor extent, the inclusion of foreign bodies such as those mentioned above. I had always felt that the public needed vastly better protection than could be given by chemical analysis alone, and that the scope of the Act was quite unduly restricted. But I do not pretend that I anticipated such a spate of prosecutions in respect of the accidental and careless admission of foreign bodies in loaves and the rest. One evident cause for this is that the public, through their association with the local Food Office, have become enforcement conscious. In the old days a normal purchaser of a loaf containing a piece of wood did not dream of taking more drastic action than remonstrating with the baker. Now, everyone's first instinct is to repair to the Food Office or the Town Hall with official complaint. Now that I am on the shelf and no longer concerned either with enforcing the Food and Drugs Act or with defending those charged with offences, I find it interesting to contrast present‐day practice with that of forty odd years ago.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 52 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

SINCE the world is so replete with institutes of various kinds it is unlikely to welcome another without a close scrutiny of its intentions, even when launched with all…

Abstract

SINCE the world is so replete with institutes of various kinds it is unlikely to welcome another without a close scrutiny of its intentions, even when launched with all the eclat of a House of Commons dinner attended by distinguished figures from the industrial and organizational fields.

Details

Work Study, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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