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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Graham H. Roberts

To evaluate the chances of success for Auchan in Russia, and draw conclusions for retail internationalisation theory.

4481

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the chances of success for Auchan in Russia, and draw conclusions for retail internationalisation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a comprehensive analysis of the Russian retail landscape and emerging patterns of consumption, especially in the capital Moscow.

Findings

The success of Auchan's Russian venture will depend on the extent to which the retailer is able to leverage its three sources of competitive advantage in its domestic market, namely the hypermarket concept, the channel mix, and the environmental context. This in turn will be a function of its ability to exploit its retail marketing skills, distribution abilities, unique retail formula, strong retail brand, or a combination of these.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is not built on empirical data, but is speculative.

Originality/value

The paper's primary value lies in the call which it contains for a more eclectic conceptual framework underpinning retail internationalisation theory. Such a framework would reflect the importance of a firm's capital structure, and also pay greater attention to organisational dynamics. Attention to these issues would enable researchers to reflect more accurately the reality of the retail internationalisation process in emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2016

Abstract

Details

Multi-Channel Marketing, Branding and Retail Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-455-6

Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2016

Abstract

Details

Multi-Channel Marketing, Branding and Retail Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-455-6

Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Michael L. Roberts and Theresa L. Roberts

This chapter examines how public attitudes and judgments about tax fairness reflect distributive justice rules about proportionality/contributions, needs, and equality;…

Abstract

This chapter examines how public attitudes and judgments about tax fairness reflect distributive justice rules about proportionality/contributions, needs, and equality; fairness issues that influence voluntary tax compliance (Hofmann, Hoelzl, & Kirchler, 2008; Spicer & Lundstedt, 1976). Most public polls and some prior research indicate the general public considers progressive income tax rates as fairer than flat tax rates, a reflection of the Needs rule of distributive justice theory; our 1,138 participants respond similarly. However, two-thirds of our politically representative sample of the American public actually assign “fair shares” of income taxes consistently with fairness-as-proportionality above an exempt amount of income, consistent with the Contributions rule of Equity Theory. We argue experimental assignments of fair shares of income taxes can best be understood as a combination of the Needs rule, applied by exempting incomes below the poverty line from income taxation (via current standard deductions) and taxing incomes above this exempt amount at a single tax rate (i.e., a flat-rate tax) consistent with the Proportionality/Contributions rule. Viewed in combination, these two distributive justice rules explain the tax fairness judgments of 89% of our sample and indicate surprising general agreement about what constitutes a fair share of income taxes that should be paid by US citizens from the 5th percentile to the 95th percentile of the income distribution. The joint application of these fairness rules indicates how seemingly competing, partisan distributive justice concerns can inform our understanding of social attitudes about tax fairness across income classes.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1974

PETER WHITFIELD and CHRIS GRAHAM

In the March issue, John Wellens reviewed Roberts, White and Parker's study of THE CHARACTER‐TRAINING INDUSTRY. One of the statements in the book with which issue may be…

Abstract

In the March issue, John Wellens reviewed Roberts, White and Parker's study of THE CHARACTER‐TRAINING INDUSTRY. One of the statements in the book with which issue may be taken was that course organisers ‘proved rather ambivalent about having their schemes assessed by outsiders.’ In the first part of the following article, Peter Whitfield, a recent graduate from the MA course in Organisational Psychology at the University of Lancaster, presents some of the findings of just such an outside assessment of the Brathay Hall Month Course which was initiated at Brathay's request in 1973. The main findings of this specific assessment are at variance in many instances with the general conclusions drawn by the Roberts team, and a more detailed report is being prepared for publication elsewhere. In the second part, Chris Graham, Brathay's Development Tutor, reviews key issues determining current and future developments at the centre in the light of Peter Whitfield's work and in the context of Roberts, White and Parker's conclusions.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Mohammad Nurunnabi

The study aims at reviewing a synthesis of disclosure, transparency, and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) implementation in an attempt to provide…

Abstract

The study aims at reviewing a synthesis of disclosure, transparency, and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) implementation in an attempt to provide directions for future research. Prior research overwhelmingly supports that the IFRS adoption or effective implementation of IFRS will enhance high-quality financial reporting, transparency, enhance the country’s investment environment, and foreign direct investment (FDI) (Dayanandan, Donker, Ivanof, & Karahan, 2016; Gláserová, 2013; Muniandy & Ali, 2012). However, some researchers provide conflicting evidence that developing countries implementing IFRS are probably not going to encounter higher FDI inflows (Gheorghe, 2009; Lasmin, 2012). It has also been argued that the IFRS adoption decreases the management earnings in countries with high levels of financial disclosure. In general, the study indicates that the adoption of IFRS has improved the financial reporting quality. The common law countries have strong rules to protect investors, strict legal enforcement, and high levels of transparency of financial information. From the extensive structured review of literature using the Scopus database tool, the study reviewed 105 articles, and in particular, the topic-related 94 articles were analysed. All 94 articles were retrieved from a range of 59 journals. Most of the articles (77 of 94) were published 2010–2018. The top five journals based on the citations are Journal of Accounting Research (187 citations), Abacus (125 citations), European Accounting Review (107 citations), Journal of Accounting and Economics (78 citations), and Accounting and Business Research (66 citations). The most-cited authors are Daske, Hail, Leuz, and Verdi (2013); Daske and Gebhardt (2006); and Brüggemann, Hitz, and Sellhorn (2013). Surprisingly, 65 of 94 articles did not utilise the theory. In particular, four theories have been used frequently: agency theory (15), economic theory (5), signalling theory (2), and accounting theory (2). The study calls for future research on the theoretical implications and policy-related research on disclosure and transparency which may inform the local and international standard setters.

Details

International Financial Reporting Standards Implementation: A Global Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-440-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1959

THE Correspondence columns of The Times always make interesting reading, but never so much as in the last four weeks, for librarians anyway. We understand that there are…

Abstract

THE Correspondence columns of The Times always make interesting reading, but never so much as in the last four weeks, for librarians anyway. We understand that there are people who do not read The Times (bottom people ?) and it is a regrettable fact that many libraries do not take The Times. For them and for recapitulation and comment we summarise the letters arising from the editorial comment on the Report of the Roberts Committee.

Details

New Library World, vol. 60 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1908

EVERYONE interested in the British library movement will learn with sorrow and regret that one of its greatest friends and strongest champions has passed away, in the…

Abstract

EVERYONE interested in the British library movement will learn with sorrow and regret that one of its greatest friends and strongest champions has passed away, in the person of Thomas Greenwood, the kind‐hearted and generous advocate of libraries, who won the respect and regard of every English libiarian. From one of his own periodicals the following particulars are abstracted:—

Details

New Library World, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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