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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Necia France, Graham Francis, STEWART LAWRENCE and Sydney Sacks

The motivation for this paper is to better understand the strengths and limitations of quantitative performance measures in a changing environment. The context is one of…

Abstract

The motivation for this paper is to better understand the strengths and limitations of quantitative performance measures in a changing environment. The context is one of organisational change and innovative management. Using a case study approach, the paper presents a history of organisational change and focuses on attempts to drive and assess efficiency through performance measures in a public hospital‐based pathology laboratory. The various financial and non‐financial performance measures used in the laboratory are presented. A discrepancy between accounting reports and laboratory management analyses of costs is reported. The notorious difficulties of costing health services are examined through the dispute that arose about whether the mean cost‐per‐test was increasing or decreasing over a three‐year period. Competing representations of performance are analysed. Whilst the case study looks at a New Zealand example, many of the pressures facing pathology services are typical of medical laboratories worldwide. General issues of performance measurement are discussed.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Jackie Fry, Ian Humphreys and Graham Francis

This paper aims to explore the use of best practice benchmarking in civil aviation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the use of best practice benchmarking in civil aviation.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence was gathered from two international questionnaire surveys of the top 200 airlines and the top 200 airports. Supplementary evidence included interviews with airline and airport managers.

Findings

The profile of responses was a good match to the samples. Benchmarking was identified as the most used performance improvement technique for both airlines and airports. Larger airlines were more likely to engage in benchmarking. Ease of usage and the cost relative to other performance improvement techniques were important factors in determining benchmarking uptake. Problems of data comparability and competitive sensitivity were raised. Airports had a greater tendency to concentrate on benchmarking with similar organisations and placed a relatively greater emphasis on its use for performance measurement over process improvement.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should include a sample of detailed case studies to investigate exactly how different airlines and airports are using benchmarking.

Practical implications

Performance measurement has become increasingly important in aviation as markets become more competitive and the number of asymmetric shocks seems to increase.

Originality/value

The surveys revealed a very high utilisation of benchmarking, although a range of activities were actually being undertaken under the banner of benchmarking. The high uptake of benchmarking is probably due, to the turbulent nature of civil aviation that has placed significant economic pressures on managers.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Ian Straker, Stephen Ison, Ian Humphreys and Graham Francis

The purpose of this paper is to explore the process benefits and findings of a functional benchmarking exercise. It explores the issues surrounding the potential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the process benefits and findings of a functional benchmarking exercise. It explores the issues surrounding the potential introduction of a direct employee car parking financial incentive or disincentive measure at an airport, drawing on best practice from specific non‐airport organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is taken in which three different organisations are considered from a functional benchmarking perspective.

Findings

There are direct findings in terms of how to develop employee parking strategies/policies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper adds to the practical literature on functional benchmarking by presenting evidence from a benchmarking exercise of three case study organisations.

Practical implications

There are practical findings in terms of the potential benefits and limitations from a functional benchmarking exercise. There are also practical recommendations in terms of organisations seeking to develop and implement staff car parking strategies.

Originality/value

The paper provides an illustration of functional benchmarking in practice.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

GRAHAM JONES

In the bright summer of 1945 history lay with a heavy weight on the library of the British Museum.

Abstract

In the bright summer of 1945 history lay with a heavy weight on the library of the British Museum.

Details

Library Review, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Graham Francis and Ian Humphreys

Abstract

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Graham Francis

Abstract

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Laura E. Drake

This project focuses specifically on how intercultural negotiating differences are evidenced communicatively. Evidence suggests that negotiators deal differently with…

Abstract

This project focuses specifically on how intercultural negotiating differences are evidenced communicatively. Evidence suggests that negotiators deal differently with internationals than domestics. Therefore, it is important to move beyond within‐culture comparisons as a basis for predicting intercultural negotiation processes. This paper tests empirically the endurance of culturally‐associated negotiation styles in inter‐cultural negotiations between Americans and Taiwanese. Results suggest that culture does exert some global effects in face‐to‐face encounters with cultural outsiders. Other aspects of negotiation are managed locally, so that predicted cultural differences do not emerge in interaction.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Graham Francis and Stewart Lawrence

Abstract

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Mark Stevens and Jered Borup

The purpose of this chapter is to overview what extant research says about parental involvement in online learning environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to overview what extant research says about parental involvement in online learning environments.

Methodology/approach

The approach in this chapter is a systematic review of literature focusing on engagement frameworks.

Findings

Parents have the potential to be the key to overcoming key concerns about attrition and achievement in online settings. However, research has been silent as to how to engage parents more fully as learning coaches for their children.

Research implications

Research about parental involvement in online learning should consider the roles of both teacher and parent as they coordinate their efforts to improve student engagement. Research also needs to look at what parents need to know about helping their students be successful and how to provide the training and expertise to parents that will help them learn critical support skills.

Originality/value

This chapter is particularly timely in light of the dramatic growth in online learning and the resulting concerns about achievement and attrition that are particularly acute among at-risk populations.

Details

Exploring Pedagogies for Diverse Learners Online
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-672-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Jacky Holloway, Graham Francis and Matthew Hinton

This paper critiques the notion that a single approach to performance improvement can alone be responsible for significant organisational transformation. We draw on…

Abstract

This paper critiques the notion that a single approach to performance improvement can alone be responsible for significant organisational transformation. We draw on phenomenological case study evidence, placed in the context of an ongoing series of studies of the nature and prevalence of best practice benchmarking in the UK, including large‐scale questionnaire surveys and longitudinal case studies of the rich experiences of a number of practitioners and organisations. We argue that complex approaches to performance improvement such as benchmarking, however technically powerful they may be, are only as effective as the people who apply them and their compatibility with the organisational context in which they are used. The contribution of such methods is often difficult to separate from other variables. In addition to internal organisational characteristics, external contextual factors play an important part both in establishing a need to use such approaches, and encouraging commitment to their use. Some of the clearest examples of the distortion of the potential impact of new management practices by the wider policy context can be found in public services such as the National Health Service, from which examples are drawn in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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