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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09576069610129874. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09576069610129874. When citing the article, please cite: Udayan Nandkeolyar, Amrik S. Sohal, Graham Burt, (1996), “Computer-aided design system upgrade process: a case study”, Integrated Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 7 Iss: 5, pp. 60 - 71.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 97 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Udayan Nandkeolyar, Amrik S. Sohal and Graham Burt

Reports on the computer‐aided design (CAD) upgrade implementation process at PBR Automotive Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Australia. Views the implementation as successful since…

Abstract

Reports on the computer‐aided design (CAD) upgrade implementation process at PBR Automotive Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Australia. Views the implementation as successful since many of the desired outcomes have been achieved or surpassed. The key success factors were detailed planning, user involvement and vendor support. These combined to create an atmosphere of excitement in the project and success. Reports on the future plans that include the development of an integrated information system at PBR which will involve customers and suppliers in addition to internal personnel. The CAD system upgrade serves as a launching board for the development of such a system.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Robert Gulbro and Paul Herbig

Suggests that, in this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiations are becoming increasingly important in the management and marketing process of many…

Abstract

Suggests that, in this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiations are becoming increasingly important in the management and marketing process of many companies. Compares the cross‐cultural negotiation behaviour and differences in the perceived processes between product‐oriented and consumer‐product firms. Reports on significant differences between the two groups and provides analysis.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 96 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Antonis C. Simintiras and Andrew H. Thomas

States that the involvement of a sales organisation in international business requires sales interactions that transcend national boundaries. Understanding the…

Abstract

States that the involvement of a sales organisation in international business requires sales interactions that transcend national boundaries. Understanding the complexities of cross‐cultural sales negotiations is most important and is a difficult task for sales managers. States that despite the importance and complex nature of cross‐cultural negotiations, the literature is normative and largely disjointed. By using the negotiation process as an analytical framework, this study examines the relevant literature, offers research propositions and indicates additional areas necessitating further research.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Ian Burt and Theresa Libby

This paper aims to examine whether increasing the salience of the internal auditor’s professional identity, defined by the expectations of their professional group…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether increasing the salience of the internal auditor’s professional identity, defined by the expectations of their professional group, increases internal auditors’ judgments of the severity of internal control concerns when their organizational identity is high.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper tests the hypothesis using a laboratory experiment with internal auditors as participants.

Findings

The results support the hypothesis that professional identity salience moderates the relation between organizational identity and the assessed severity of identified internal control weaknesses. Increasing the salience of professional identity results in a more severe assessment of identified internal control weaknesses when organizational identity is high than when it is low.

Originality/value

Prior research in the lab and in the field provides mixed results about the impact of organizational identity on internal auditors’ judgments of the severity of identified internal control concerns. This paper contributes to the discussion on this issue. In addition, the results have implications for the debate about the benefits and costs of in-house versus out-sourced internal audit functions.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2016

Matthew E. Brashears and Laura Aufderheide Brashears

Balance Theory has accumulated an impressive record of empirical confirmation at both the micro- and macro-levels. Yet, it is unclear why humans consistently prefer…

Abstract

Purpose

Balance Theory has accumulated an impressive record of empirical confirmation at both the micro- and macro-levels. Yet, it is unclear why humans consistently prefer balanced relations when imbalance offers the opportunity to reap material rewards. We argue that balance is preferred because it functions as a “compression heuristic,” allowing networks to be more easily encoded in, and recalled from, memory.

Methodology/approach

We present the results of a novel randomized laboratory experiment using nearly 300 subjects. We evaluate the independent and joint effects of degree of balance/imbalance and presence/absence of kin compression heuristics on network recall.

Findings

We find that memory for relationship valence is more accurate for balanced, rather than imbalanced, networks and that relationship existence and relationship valence are separable cognitive elements. We also use comparisons between kin and non-kin networks to suggest that humans are implicitly aware of the conditions under which imbalanced networks will be most durable.

Research limitations/implications

We show that the tension/strain postulated to generate mental and behavioral responses to increase balance likely stems from cognitive limitations. More broadly, this connects balance theory to models of human cognition and evolution and suggests that human general processing ability may have evolved in response to social, rather than physical, challenges.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-041-1

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Gerald R. Ferris, John N. Harris, Zachary A. Russell, B. Parker Ellen, Arthur D. Martinez and F. Randy Blass

Scholarship on reputation in and of organizations has been going on for decades, and it always has separated along level of analysis issues, whereby the separate…

Abstract

Scholarship on reputation in and of organizations has been going on for decades, and it always has separated along level of analysis issues, whereby the separate literatures on individual, group/team/unit, and organization reputation fail to acknowledge each other. This sends the implicit message that reputation is a fundamentally different phenomenon at the three different levels of analysis. We tested the validity of this implicit assumption by conducting a multilevel review of the reputation literature, and drawing conclusions about the “level-specific” or “level-generic” nature of the reputation construct. The review results permitted the conclusion that reputation phenomena are essentially the same at all levels of analysis. Based on this, we frame a future agenda for theory and research on reputation.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-824-2

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Lily Morse, Jonathan Keeney and Christopher P. Adkins

In this chapter, we explore the importance of morality in groups. We draw from decades of research from multiple perspectives, including psychology, neuroscience…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the importance of morality in groups. We draw from decades of research from multiple perspectives, including psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, and organizational science, to illustrate the range of ways that morality influences social attitudes and group behavior. After synthesizing the literature, we identify promising directions for business ethics scholars to pursue. We specifically call for greater research on morality at the meso, or group, level of analysis and encourage studies examining the complex relationship between moral emotions and the social environment. We ultimately hope that this work will provide new insights for managing moral behavior in groups and society.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Robert Gulbro and Paul Herbig

In this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiation is becoming an increasingly important part of the management and marketing process for nearly every firm…

Abstract

In this age of the global economy, cross‐cultural negotiation is becoming an increasingly important part of the management and marketing process for nearly every firm. Compares the cross‐cultural negotiation behaviour and differences in the perceived processes between those firms which consider themselves North American‐focused and those firms which report a worldwide or international outlook. Proposes several hypotheses, reports significant differences between the two groups and provides analysis.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Johan Anselmsson, Niklas Bondesson and Frans Melin

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between an organization’s human resource management (HRM) image and its customer-based brand equity. Research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between an organization’s human resource management (HRM) image and its customer-based brand equity. Research into HRM in relation to branding has mostly dealt with how to attract and maintain employees through employer branding. The present study attempts to link HRM directly to marketing and branding aimed at customers as an altruistic dimension of the brand image and as something that applies to customers’ sociological needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a survey of Swedish customers in two different retail categories: groceries and home decoration.

Findings

The results show that HRM image is distinct from a more traditional service image and that there is a significant relationship between favourable customer perceptions of an organization’s HRM and customers’ willingness to buy and pay a premium for products provided by the retail chain. This finding leads to the conclusion that HRM is not only relevant for employer branding, internal branding and operations management but also plays a significant role in building customer-based brand equity. The results show that further integration of HRM and brand management is needed, both in theory and practice.

Originality/value

This study takes a holistic approach to marketing and is one of the first attempts to incorporate HRM and employer branding into the customer-based brand equity framework. Implications for future research, retailing and other businesses are discussed in the conclusion.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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