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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Eliav Danziger and Leif Danziger

This chapter analyzes the effects of introducing a graduated minimum wage in a model with optimal income taxation in which a government seeks to maximize social welfare…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the effects of introducing a graduated minimum wage in a model with optimal income taxation in which a government seeks to maximize social welfare. It shows that the optimal graduated minimum wage increases social welfare by increasing the low-productivity workers’ consumption and bringing it closer to the first-best. The chapter also describes how the graduated minimum wage in a social welfare optimum depends on important economy characteristics such as the government’s revenue needs, the social welfare weight of low-productivity workers, and the numbers and productivities of the different types of workers.

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Transitions through the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-462-6

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Abstract

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Transitions through the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-462-6

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Abstract

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Transitions through the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-462-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2012

Lorenzo Corsini

This article studies the evolution of the wage differentials between graduate (skilled) and non-graduate (unskilled) workers in several European countries from the…

Abstract

This article studies the evolution of the wage differentials between graduate (skilled) and non-graduate (unskilled) workers in several European countries from the beginning of the 1990s to the beginning of this century. The starting point is that all European countries show a common increase in the relative supply of skilled workers but different evolution of wage differentials. Economics theory usually relates the evolution of wage differentials not only to relative supply but also to skill-biased technological progress. I complement this explanation providing a theoretical model of wage bargaining where wage differentials are determined also by labour market institutions. My empirical findings show that both technological progress and labour market institutions are important in the determination of wage differentials. As for the former, I find that differentials depend on the pace and intensity at which technological progress takes place. As for labour market institutions, their effect, though important, is not always straightforward. In fact, some aspects of institutions, like minimum wage and the duration of unemployment benefits, favour unskilled workers while other aspects, like bargaining power and replacement rates from unemployment benefits, may magnify the differences in outside options and actually increase wage differentials.

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Research in Labor Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-358-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Vasiliki Koutsogeorgopoulou

Examines the employment effects of minimum wage regulation on Greekmanufacturing for the period 1962‐87. The empirical analysis is carriedout in three steps. First…

Abstract

Examines the employment effects of minimum wage regulation on Greek manufacturing for the period 1962‐87. The empirical analysis is carried out in three steps. First, estimates the effect of the minimum wage on the average wages of adult male and female industrial workers to derive estimates of wage elasticities of each type of labour with respect to the minimum wage. Second, estimates labour demand equations for the two types of labour to derive the employment elasticities with respect to the corresponding average wage. Finally, provides estimates on the employment effects of the minimum wage by combining the results derived in the first two stages. The results provide some indications that the minimum wage plays a more significant role in the employment of female than male workers in manufacturing, and suggest that minimum wages positively affect the average real wage of both types of workers examined.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 15 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2001

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Edwin Seligman's Lectures on Public Finance, 1927/1928
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-073-9

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Gil S. Epstein, Dalit Gafni and Erez Siniver

Economic outcomes are compared for university graduates in Israel belonging to four different ethnic groups. A unique data set is used that includes all individuals who…

Abstract

Purpose

Economic outcomes are compared for university graduates in Israel belonging to four different ethnic groups. A unique data set is used that includes all individuals who graduated with a first degree from universities and colleges in Israel between the years 1995 and 2008 and which tracks them for up to ten years from the year they graduated. The main finding is that education and experience appear to have a strong effect on earnings in the long run and that an ethnic group can improve its position relative to certain groups while there is no effect relative to other groups. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider three of the main factors determining the success of assimilation: size of the ethnic group; cultural differences between groups and skin color; and examine how these factors affect economic outcomes. The authors use a unique data set that includes all individuals who graduated with a first degree from universities and colleges in Israel between the years 1995 and 2008.

Findings

The results obtained in this study show that on average native Jews attain the best economic outcomes, followed by FSU immigrants, Israeli Arabs and finally Ethiopian immigrants. Education and experience appear to have a strong effect on earnings in the long run. An ethnic group can improve its position relative to other groups as they accumulate work experience.

Originality/value

This is the first time that the Ethiopian immigrants where taken into account.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 25 February 2016

Elena Crivellaro

While there has been intense debate in the empirical literature over the evolution of the college wage premium in the United States, its evolution in Europe has received…

Abstract

While there has been intense debate in the empirical literature over the evolution of the college wage premium in the United States, its evolution in Europe has received little attention. This paper investigates the causes of the evolution of the college wage premium in 12 European countries from 1994 to 2009, assessing the relevance of the supply factor as a determinant of the college wage premium. I use cross-country variation in relative supply, demand, and labour market institutions to examine their effects on the trend in wage inequality. I address possible concerns of endogeneity of the relative supply using an IV strategy exploiting the differential legislations of university autonomy and their variations over time. Results show that the strong increase in the relative supply that European countries have experienced has decreased the college wage premium. The most relevant institution is the minimun wage, which significantly decreases college wage premium.

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Inequality: Causes and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-810-0

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Nur Hidayah Che Ahmat, Susan Wohlsdorf Arendt and Daniel Wayne Russell

This study aims to generate novel insights about minimum wage policy implementation through a joint assessment of the mediating roles of work motivation, work engagement…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to generate novel insights about minimum wage policy implementation through a joint assessment of the mediating roles of work motivation, work engagement and job satisfaction in predicting outcomes such as turnover intention and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from hotel employees in Malaysia using an electronic survey. A total of 239 responses were used in analyzing direct and indirect effects.

Findings

Results reveal that work motivation, work engagement and job satisfaction significantly mediated the relationship between employee compensation satisfaction and employee turnover intention. Work motivation was found to mediate the relationship between employee compensation satisfaction and employee work engagement. Additionally, work engagement and job satisfaction mediated the relationship between employee work motivation and employee turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

Missing data are inevitable in survey research. Due to data missing for some of the demographic questions, the moderating effect of certain demographic characteristics (e.g. sex) could not be assessed.

Practical implications

Given recent minimum wage policy implementation in Malaysia, it is imperative that Malaysian hotel operators understand to what extent employee compensation satisfaction influences how employees perceived their jobs and to what extent work motivation, work engagement and job satisfaction mediate employee compensation satisfaction and employee turnover intention.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to the hospitality compensation research area, specifically regarding the impact of compensation on how employees perceived their jobs after minimum wage implementation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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