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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Maria Eliophotou Menon and Anastasia Athanasoula-Reppa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the problems faced by unemployed and underemployed graduate students in a small European country. It focusses on the way young…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the problems faced by unemployed and underemployed graduate students in a small European country. It focusses on the way young people adjust to unemployment and underemployment and on the specific strategies they use to enhance their employability. Various aspects of these strategies as they relate to student decision making and analysis are discussed. The role of new skills and competencies in managing graduate unemployment is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted with 15 graduate students of the Education Department of the University of Cyprus. In-depth interviews and focus-group interviews were used to collect data.

Findings

The results indicate that the main strategy used by respondents in order to enhance their prospects of employment is the acquisition of additional skills and competencies. A secondary strategy is the pursuit of employment opportunities abroad. Student decisions and perspectives appear to be optimistic, partially rational, placed within a short-term horizon and influenced by the belief in the investment value of education.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are qualitative and cannot be considered to be representative of the population. However, they allow an in-depth analysis of the way a group of students experiences and manages unemployment and underemployment.

Originality/value

The way young people deal with unemployment and underemployment has not been investigated in many studies, especially in relation to the degree to which graduates formulate specific strategies in order to manage the transition from the university to the world of work. Students’ and graduates’ perceptions regarding the association between skills and employment can provide the basis for more informed planning and policy making in higher education.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Macleans A. Geo‐Jaja

The structural links of non‐formal education tothe world of work and graduate unemploymentin Nigeria are examined. The role ofgovernment′s stop‐gap measures and…

Abstract

The structural links of non‐formal education to the world of work and graduate unemployment in Nigeria are examined. The role of government′s stop‐gap measures and the inadequacies of the formal educational institution are discussed. These policies resulted in the worsening of graduate unemployment, labour market segmentation and élite class formation, while only marginally increasing employment. Non‐formal education represented a more meaningful approach to solving graduate unemployment, and matching skills with job needs, than the contemporary approach.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2018

Rihab Khalifa

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigated the feasibility of a women-only professional accounting firm in the city of Al Ain in the United Arab…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigated the feasibility of a women-only professional accounting firm in the city of Al Ain in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) that could help reduce female graduate unemployment in the city. Practically, the study sought to find out if, and under what conditions, a women-only professional accounting firm in Al Ain might be useful in providing employment for women in professional accountancy and facilitating the entry of female graduates into the job market by providing them with professional training. Theoretically, the study sought to add to the literature on positive discrimination to help women’s job prospects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a qualitative research approach. It sought to show some specific connections between various professional, cultural, and economic factors by crystallising them through a hypothetical, innovative solution to the problem of local female unemployment, namely, a women-only professional accounting firm in a location of limited employment opportunities. It did so by investigating the views of male and female accounting graduates and other stakeholders.

Findings

The main finding is that the model women-only professional accounting firm could be used to overcome family objections to female graduate employment by removing the requirement that women work a long distance away from their families. The study also showed the deep cultural entrenchment of gendered stereotypes of female professionals.

Research limitations/implications

The study could have had a larger sample size with the survey, but it is important to note that this was not the focus of the study. However, the strength of the paper is in the qualitative aspect of canvassing views from various stakeholders.

Practical implications

The study brought to light key opportunities and challenges for policy makers who are seeking to address female graduate unemployment in economically remote locations.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the literature on positive discrimination for female job seekers in an adverse cultural and economic context.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Gordon Aitken

In 1993, the Responsive College Unit (RCU), an independent educationalmarket research organization based in Blackburn, was commissioned by theEast Lancashire Training and…

Abstract

In 1993, the Responsive College Unit (RCU), an independent educational market research organization based in Blackburn, was commissioned by the East Lancashire Training and Enterprise Council (ELTEC) to evaluate the labour market experiences of graduates from Lancashire. Describes the survey which followed almost 6,500 graduates; 40 per cent of the entire graduate cohorts for the period 1991‐93 returned questionnaires. Suggests that the results shed new light on the plight of graduates seeking employment in the current recession and also identified important factors which determine the extent to which local economies like Lancashire are able to retain the skills of their most qualified young people. Describes the main findings from the research and identifies the picture that emerged of the current realities of the transition from higher education to work.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1985

Jason Tarsh

This article is intended to give a detailed if summary account of recent statistics and research on the graduate labour market. The past five years have seen renewed…

Abstract

This article is intended to give a detailed if summary account of recent statistics and research on the graduate labour market. The past five years have seen renewed interest in links between higher education and the economy. Graduate manpower statistics can therefore be seen not just as records of graduate deployment but also as means of assessing claims that have been made about higher education and the labour market. Where possible this account of the statistics includes a brief reference to how they can be used in this type of debate.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Brownhilder Ngek Neneh

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether personality traits play a significant role in understanding students’ self-perceived employability and test if the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether personality traits play a significant role in understanding students’ self-perceived employability and test if the associations are influenced by the student’s job market appraisal. This is important as perceptions about one’s employability hold invaluable importance for students in uncertain job environments as they might need to form strategies to cope with unemployment until they find a job.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 296 using a questionnaire survey approach and analyzed using hierarchical regression to test the hypothesized associations.

Findings

The findings showed that agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness to experience are positive and significantly associated with self-perceived employability. Also, job market appraisal played a momentous role in predicting self-perceived employability both directly and via interaction with conscientiousness and openness to experience.

Practical implications

The present study is valuable to different stakeholders such as educators, employers and students as it identifies the personality dispositions that should be encouraged among students while also indicating the need for fostering student’s reappraisal of uncertain job markets.

Originality/value

This study presents new evidence on the application of the appraisal theory by indicating the interaction between personality traits and cognitive appraisal. This advances the current theoretical understanding of the mechanism through which personality traits can best explain individual differences in self-perceived employability.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2013

Fernando Lourenço, Tony G. Taylor and David W. Taylor

This paper seeks to highlight the role of entrepreneurship education in encouraging the growth of graduate entrepreneurship in the UK to help overcome the over‐supply of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight the role of entrepreneurship education in encouraging the growth of graduate entrepreneurship in the UK to help overcome the over‐supply of university graduates in a very difficult employment market. This paper aims to discuss the design principle for entrepreneurship education that facilitates graduate entrepreneurship, and the design methodology that allows multi‐faculty collaboration in the provision of entrepreneurship programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper begins with the conceptualisation of design principles and frameworks based on current concepts found in the literature, followed by practitioner‐based reflection to shed insights into the process of developing entrepreneurship education in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Findings

The authors have developed the “30/70 methodology” to guide the future design of entrepreneurship education, and the “80/20 methodology” to support cross‐faculty entrepreneurship programmes to serve non‐business students. Factors that impede or support academic entrepreneurship and effective integration of entrepreneurship programmes in HEIs are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper shares the authors' experiences, and their unique design principles and methodology to support the development of education for entrepreneurship.

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Steffen Müller and Renate Neubaeumer

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how long-run unemployment of former apprentices depends on the size of their training firm and their ability.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how long-run unemployment of former apprentices depends on the size of their training firm and their ability.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a large administrative data set that follows graduated apprentices during their working life. They show that training in large and medium-sized firms is associated with considerably less unemployment. This, however, may simply be the result of sorting processes, i.e. larger training firms with higher wage levels attract and choose the most able young workers. Therefore, the authors use a proxy for ability to estimate and control for the impact of ability on long-run unemployment. They assume that rank-order tournaments for the most attractive training positions take place and take into account an institutional peculiarity of the German training system, the empirically observable regional immobility of apprentices. Accordingly, they use a region-specific ranking based on training plants’ size or median wages, respectively, to proxy for apprentices’ ability.

Findings

The negative association between training plant size and long-run unemployment is muted but still statistically well determined even after controlling for the rank of an individual’s training firm in the local plant size distribution or the local wage distribution, respectively. Thus, the rank itself is a predictor for long-run unemployment of apprentices. The fact that the position in the local size distribution matters conditional on plant size shows that there is a local competition for training places.

Practical implications

Lacking mobility may increases aggregate unemployment, as mobility reduces the risk of unemployment.

Social implications

The results imply that supporting regional mobility of young workers, e.g., by informing them better about existing mobility subsidies and dormitories for apprentices and by creating additional mobility incentives is warranted.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate long-run unemployment of former apprentices. Furthermore, the authors develop new variables to proxy for ability.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2020

Innocent Otache, Dorcas Omanyo Oluwade and Ele-Ojo Jeremiah Idoko

Undergraduate students have two opposing employment intentions, viz. self-employment intentions and paid-employment intentions (SEIs and PEIs). While a plethora of studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Undergraduate students have two opposing employment intentions, viz. self-employment intentions and paid-employment intentions (SEIs and PEIs). While a plethora of studies have explored the links between entrepreneurship education (EE) and SEIs, it has been noted that previous studies have ignored the effects of PEIs on the relationship between EE and SEIs. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to empirically explore the effects of PEIs on the relationship between EE and SEIs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a descriptive research design and a self-reported questionnaire was administered to collect data from a randomly selected sample of 95 accounting students from two polytechnics in Nigeria. To test the hypotheses formulated, partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was performed using SmartPLS.

Findings

The results of Model 1 showed that EE had a significantly positive link with SEIs. On the other hand, the analysis of Model 2 revealed an inverse relationship between PEIs and SEIs. Furthermore, it was observed that the impact of EE on SEIs did not only reduce significantly when PEIs was added to Model 1 but also the relationship between EE and SEIs that was erstwhile statistically significant became nonsignificant.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for EE curriculum developers, governments and career guidance counsellors.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to provide empirical evidence of the effects of PEIs on the relationship between EE and SEIs. The findings provide important insights into the fundamental issue, which underlies the problem of graduate unemployment.

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Rabah Noui

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the policy of massification as a characteristic of the higher education system influences the quality of education? and what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the policy of massification as a characteristic of the higher education system influences the quality of education? and what higher education model can the authors adopt to reconcile flow and quality?

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted is based on a questionnaire survey of a population of young graduates divided between graduates with a conventional license and LMD license, either in the process of preparing for a diploma or in unemployment or work. But also, the qualitative dimension which, although secondary in this survey, the authors mobilized it through the analysis of open questions relating to the perceptions and representations that young graduates have of their situations.

Findings

The higher education reforms are perceived differently by higher education actors. The results found show that university massification has had the opposite effect by training graduates doomed to unemployment and expatriation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample for this study is very limited, the results of this finding cannot be generalized to the entire university student as a whole.

Originality/value

This study emphasizes the duality of flow and quality in higher education. The authors have shown the different perceptions of stakeholders in higher education and that despite the multiple reforms of this system the authors still cannot find the best model.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

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