Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mark Jeffery, David Bibbs, Michael Dowhan, Daniel Grace, Lisa Jackson, Woody Maynard, Derek Yung and Steve Johnson

The case is based on a real supply chain outsourcing management decision at a major manufacturing company. The company has been disguised for confidentiality reasons. The…

Abstract

The case is based on a real supply chain outsourcing management decision at a major manufacturing company. The company has been disguised for confidentiality reasons. The case discusses different types of outsourcing, supply chain management, the benefits and risks of outsourcing, and various pricing models for outsourcing contracts. Students must make a management decision and answer these questions: Is supply chain outsourcing a viable option for DB Toys? What will the return on investment be? What is the best outsourcing model? What is the best pricing model?

Students learn the different types of outsourcing, supply chain management, the benefits and risks of outsourcing, and various pricing models for outsourcing contracts. Students also learn how to calculate the return on investment of supply chain outsourcing. Most important, the case enables students to understand the strategic context of outsourcing, and to decide which outsourcing model and pricing is appropriate.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Stavroula Kontovourki, Elisabeth Johnson and Grace Enriquez

Abstract

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Li Sun, Grace Johnson and Fuad Rahman

– The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the financial expertise of the chief financial officer (CFO) and concerns about corporate governance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between the financial expertise of the chief financial officer (CFO) and concerns about corporate governance.

Design/methodology/approach

Consistent with prior research, the authors used four variables, including certified public accountant (CPA) certification, Master of Business Administration degree, age of CFO and length of CFO tenure, to measure CFO’s financial expertise. The authors hypothesize a negative association between CFO expertise and concerns about corporate governance.

Findings

Regression analysis revealed that the CPA certification is negatively associated with governance concerns at a significant level. The results suggest that stakeholders show less concerns about a company’s corporate governance mechanism when the CFO has a CPA certification. In particular, the results support the recommendation by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants that a CFO of a public firm should have a CPA certification.

Originality/value

The study is important in the following ways. First, the study delivers new evidence on the link between CFO financial expertise and corporate governance. This contributes to the CFO financial expertise literature and the corporate governance literature. Second, according to Standard and Poor’s, equity index investing has grown more popular over the past 30 years. The study delivers useful information to index investors who invest in S & P SmallCap 600 Index. Third, regulators have put a large amount of resources to discover ways to strengthen firms’ corporate governance. Thus, the results should be of interest to policy makers who design and implement guidelines on corporate governance mechanisms.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Grace F. Johnson‐Page and R. Scott Thatcher

Reviews 149 business‐to‐consumer (B2C) Web sites in nine countries and across five industries. One wanted to identify patterns that would allow one to draw conclusions…

Abstract

Reviews 149 business‐to‐consumer (B2C) Web sites in nine countries and across five industries. One wanted to identify patterns that would allow one to draw conclusions about why companies chose to display data privacy policies on their Web sites. Presents an overview of the impact of business forces, telecommunications infrastructure, and culture on B2C Web site development. Having examined these sites, it is believed that the level of sophistication and development of a company’s Web site plays a role in whether a data privacy policy is displayed on the site. It was concluded that data privacy policies are more commonly found on B2C Web sites in countries where: consumers have greater access to and experience of using the Web, and there is an established market economy with clear business laws. These sites have a greater tendency to disclose detailed and conspicuously positioned policies to consumers about how their personal data will be used.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Ronald D. Snee

The purpose of this paper is to assess Lean Six Sigma to identify important advances over the last ten to 15 years and discuss emerging trends that suggest how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess Lean Six Sigma to identify important advances over the last ten to 15 years and discuss emerging trends that suggest how the methodology needs to evolve. The goal is to aid those who want to use the method to improve performance as well as assist those developing improvement methodologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The use and development of Lean Six Sigma is reviewed including the origins of the method, the what, why and benefits of the method, how the approach is different, the integration of Lean and Six Sigma, implementation mistakes made, lessons learned and developments needed in the future.

Findings

It is found that organizations have many different improvement needs that require the objectives and methods contained in the lean and Six Sigma methodologies. It is also found that deployment and sustaining improvements are major issues that can be overcome by building a sustaining infrastructure and making improvement a business process. Critical issues include using Lean Six Sigma to generate cash in difficult economic times, development of data‐based process management systems and the use of working on improvement as a leadership development tool.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that improvement is most effective when approached in an holistic manner addressing improvement in all parts of the organization using a holistic improvement methodology such as Lean Six Sigma. Improvement must address the flow of information and materials thorough processes as well as the enhancement of value‐adding process steps that create the product for the customer. This leads naturally to making improvement a business process that is planned for, operated and reviewed as any other important business process is.

Originality/value

The roadmaps, guiding principles, and deployment pitfalls identified will be of value to those initiating and operating improvement processes in their organizations enabling them to rapidly create useful and sustainable improvements. The discussion of needed enhancements will be of value to those who are working to improve the effectiveness of the approach.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1969

THE greatly increased interest in historical studies since the second world war has been, I hope, a welcome challenge to librarians, but it has been very difficult to meet…

Abstract

THE greatly increased interest in historical studies since the second world war has been, I hope, a welcome challenge to librarians, but it has been very difficult to meet it. That the librarians of our new universities should have had little research material to offer was only to be expected. Unfortunately, research scholars have discovered that our older libraries were also deficient, that source materials had either not been purchased, in the years when they were readily available, or had been acquired only to be discarded at a later date. Recently, therefore, both old libraries and new have found themselves in competition for a small and dwindling supply of out‐of‐print publications.

Details

New Library World, vol. 70 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1966

THINGS have travelled full circle. There was a time when the Swedes were busy learning from our enterprise and experiences, especially in the fields of industry and…

Abstract

THINGS have travelled full circle. There was a time when the Swedes were busy learning from our enterprise and experiences, especially in the fields of industry and commerce; now the position is somewhat reversed and we are eager to profit from them in such diverse fields as social welfare, labour relations, modern design generally, and what is more relevant here, librarianship. Sweden has also much to offer from its cultural life through its novelists, poets, artists and musicians, many of whom deserve wider audiences both here and in other countries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Åsmund Hermansen and Tove Midtsundstad

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on developments in Norwegian companies’ active-ageing policies, and hence offer insight into what characterises those Norwegian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on developments in Norwegian companies’ active-ageing policies, and hence offer insight into what characterises those Norwegian companies offering measures to retain their older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research questions are investigated using data from two surveys carried out among a representative sample of Norwegian companies in 2005 and 2010. The two data sets are analysed both separately and jointly, being merged to obtain a pooled cross-section data set. Both multivariate logistic and linear regression are applied.

Findings

The proportion of companies offering retention measures, as well as the extensiveness of their retention efforts (the number of different measures offered), has increased considerably from 2005 to 2010. What characterises these companies however is surprisingly similar in 2005 and 2010. The retention efforts of Norwegian companies seem to be part of a holistic approach to active ageing. Offering a number of different retention measures is more common among companies having initiated “measures to facilitate lifelong learning” and “measures to prevent health problems or reduced work capacity”. The financial incentives embedded in the contractual early retirement scheme seem also to have a significant impact on retention efforts.

Originality/value

The employers’ perspective has received little attention in previous research and the authors are the first to report on developments in Norwegian companies’ retention efforts over time. Knowledge about what characterises employers offering such measures will be important for future efforts to increase employments rates among older workers, which is an aim for most European countries.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1956

THE great advantage the contemporary librarian enjoys is the opportunity of meeting his fellows at so many library assemblies. It might almost be wondered whether, in such…

Abstract

THE great advantage the contemporary librarian enjoys is the opportunity of meeting his fellows at so many library assemblies. It might almost be wondered whether, in such opulence, the one great Conference in September is really necessary: a wonder that is immediately modified by the thought that no other meeting can give a representation of what the profession as a whole is doing or hoping to do; the many parts of the whole come together briefly then. It is the more necessary that the Conference makes this annual revelation, and does it manifestly. This is “much easier said than done”. Looking back on the almost complete disregard by the Press of the Folkestone meeting, in spite of our own statement that we had sought publicity for at least half a century in vain, we are compelled to think that renewed efforts should be made to attract the newspapers, radio and T.V. in the service of libraries. We are assuming that such notoriety is desirable, an assumption which some deny. If it is, our programmes must be ready sooner, advance matter of papers should be in the hands of editors before they are read, paragraphs for the B.B.C. and other public address organizations should be prepared and distributed even longer, before the newspapers get them. All this, however, must be based upon the proceedings themselves which, as we have affirmed often, should with a few inspirational exceptions be based upon the programme of service every type of library gives to the community.

Details

New Library World, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1970

Function libraries, and indeed the majority of organisations, especially those operating on a commercial basis or utilising public funds, consist of material and human…

Abstract

Function libraries, and indeed the majority of organisations, especially those operating on a commercial basis or utilising public funds, consist of material and human structures. The leaders of the human structure utilise personnel and materials in the pursuit of certain goals. Brech itemises four main elements in this process of planning and regulating enterprise activities. They comprise:

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of over 1000