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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Mohammad Arif Rohman

This study aims to investigate the government’s role in the development of toll road projects that adopt public-private partnership (PPP) schemes in Indonesia. In addition…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the government’s role in the development of toll road projects that adopt public-private partnership (PPP) schemes in Indonesia. In addition to investigating its role, this study also attempts to quantitatively assess its performance as the use of quantitative analysis in this area is still fairly limited. The analysis was developed from the perspectives of two main stakeholders involved: government and private sectors. The findings of this study are expected to help both government and private sectors to better understand the government’s role as well as its performance in PPP toll road projects in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was analysed by using statistical methods. Following the identification of the government’s role in PPP toll road projects from the literature, a preliminary survey involving 12 highway construction experts was conducted to verify the initial findings from the literature review. Subsequently, the authors conducted a survey of 146 respondents from both government and private sectors. To analyse the collected data, both descriptive and inferential statistics were used, which include analysis of means, analysis of reliability, as well as independent T-test. T-test was used to examine differences in perception between the two groups.

Findings

In total, 12 criteria from the literature were used to assess the government’s role and its performance in PPP toll road projects in Indonesia. Based on the analysis, the authors find that the government’s role in the development of PPP toll road projects can be considered moderate in its performance. In this respect, the author argue that, instead of focusing on meeting all the criteria, it would be better for government to focus on meeting only a number of them, which include realizing smooth land acquisition, selecting appropriate concessionaire, offering a solution to community protests over environmental issues, providing substantial government support, providing supervision, enforcing the law and eradicating corruption. The results of this study provide valuable information for international parties aiming to participate in PPP toll road projects in Indonesia, considering this country has been offering a wide opportunity for private sectors to be involved in developing infrastructure. Meanwhile, for the host government, the findings can be used as the basis for conducting improvements to attract private sectors’ involvement and to achieve more successful upcoming PPP toll road projects in Indonesia.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study might provide valuable information for the host government to evaluate its role and performance to achieve more successful PPP toll road projects in the future. Rather than focusing on all attributes, the improvements can be made by focusing only on the critical ones: those ranked high on the importance and low on its performance. In addition, this finding can also help private sectors to better understand both the role and performance of government in Indonesia as this country offers a great opportunity for infrastructure investment through PPP schemes.

Practical implications

The findings of this study might provide valuable information for the host government to evaluate its role and performance to achieve more successful PPP toll road projects in the future. Rather than focusing on all attributes, the improvements can be made by focusing only on the critical ones: those ranked high on the importance and low on its performance. In addition, this finding can also help private sectors to better understand both the role and performance of government in Indonesia as this country offers a great opportunity for infrastructure investment through PPP schemes.

Social implications

Text.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the body of knowledge on the criteria to assess the government’s role performance in the Indonesian PPP toll road projects. Whilst there is still limited research has been conducted regarding the government’s role in the PPP toll road projects in Indonesia, this study presented the criteria of the government’s role and showed how to assess and evaluate the host government’s performance based on these criteria in a more objective approach using quantitative method. This result can be used as the basis for improvements to achieve a more successful PPP toll road project in Indonesia and might be in other similar developing countries.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2015

P. W. Senarath Yapa and Sarath Ukwatte

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the reasons why Sri Lanka adopted International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) recently. Many less developed countries…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the reasons why Sri Lanka adopted International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) recently. Many less developed countries (LDCs) have introduced IPSAS during the recent past. However, little research has been conducted to study the New Public Financial Management and accrual accounting and their impact on LDCs.

Methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach, the methods of this paper consist of interviews, a documentary review and participatory observation in the Ministry of Finance and Planning (MOFP) and Auditor General’s Department of Sri Lanka, and present a critical interpretation supported by the perspective of globalisation.

Findings

The findings of the research indicate that the public sector reforms and the transition from cash accounting to accrual accounting in the public sector have been strongly affected by the global pressures imposed by international agencies such as International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board (IPSASB) and the World Bank (WB). Empirical evidence shows the dysfunctional impact of globalisation in the public sector accounting standards as there are major structural issues yet to resolve. There are increasing doubts over whether the change to accrual accounting is worth the costs and the additional risks involved.

Research limitations

The results of the interviews are based on the knowledge and past experiences of interviewees. What is generalisable is an understanding of the processes and mechanisms that relate to the way the public sector accounting functions.

Originality/value

This paper adds new literature on public sector accounting in LDCs, which recognises the nexus and interests of international agencies and practice of public sector accounting.

Details

The Public Sector Accounting, Accountability and Auditing in Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-662-1

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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Channing Arndt, Sam Jones and Finn Tarp

We consider the relationship between external aid and development in Mozambique from 1980–2004, identifying the specific mechanisms through which aid has influenced the…

Abstract

We consider the relationship between external aid and development in Mozambique from 1980–2004, identifying the specific mechanisms through which aid has influenced the developmental trajectory of the country. We undertake both a growth accounting analysis and review the intended and unintended effects of aid at the micro-level. Sustained aid flows to Mozambique, in conflict and post-conflict periods, have made an unambiguous, positive contribution to rapid growth since 1992. However, proliferation of donors and aid-supported interventions has burdened local administration, indicating a need for deeper domestic government accountability. To sustain growth, Mozambique must maximize benefits from natural resources while promoting constructive international market integration.

Details

Theory and Practice of Foreign Aid
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-52765-3

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Kai Liu

What is the relation between the land system with Chinese characteristics and the country's high-speed economic growth in the past decades? There is a lack of rigorous…

Abstract

Purpose

What is the relation between the land system with Chinese characteristics and the country's high-speed economic growth in the past decades? There is a lack of rigorous academic research based on the general equilibrium theory of macroeconomics on this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

By building a multisector dynamic general equilibrium framework with land system, this paper explores how the land supply mode with Chinese characteristics affects China's economic growth as well as its transmission mechanism.

Findings

This paper confirms the importance of land system with Chinese characteristics in explaining the mystery of China's high-speed economic growth. Counterfactual analysis shows that if China adopts a land system similar to that of other developing countries, GDP will drop 36% from the current level under the baseline model.

Originality/value

As the industrial sector shrinks relatively and the output elasticity of infrastructure decreases, this inhibitory effect will become more apparent. China should improve its land supply mode, especially expand the supply of commercial and residential land and reduce the cost of land in the service sector. This can promote better economic development in the future and thus improve household welfare and the structure of aggregate demand, replace “land-based public finance” and thus inhibit the “high leverage” risks of local governments.

Details

China Political Economy, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-1652

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Cedric Pugh

It was not until the late 1960s that housing attracted much attention from academic social scientists. Since that time the literature has expanded widely and diversified…

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1534

Abstract

It was not until the late 1960s that housing attracted much attention from academic social scientists. Since that time the literature has expanded widely and diversified, establishing housing with a specialised status in economics, sociology, politics, and in related subjects. As we would expect, the new literature covers a technical, statistical, theoretical, ideological, and historical range. Housing studies have not been conceived and interpreted in a monolithic way, with generally accepted concepts and principles, or with uniformly fixed and precise methodological approaches. Instead, some studies have been derived selectively from diverse bases in conventional theories in economics or sociology, or politics. Others have their origins in less conventional social theory, including neo‐Marxist theory which has had a wider intellectual following in the modern democracies since the mid‐1970s. With all this diversity, and in a context where ideological positions compete, housing studies have consequently left in their wake some significant controversies and some gaps in evaluative perspective. In short, the new housing intellectuals have written from personal commitments to particular cognitive, theoretical, ideological, and national positions and experiences. This present piece of writing takes up the two main themes which have emerged in the recent literature. These themes are first, questions relating to building and developing housing theory, and, second, the issue of how we are to conceptualise housing and relate it to policy studies. We shall be arguing that the two themes are closely related: in order to create a useful housing theory we must have awareness and understanding of housing practice and the nature of housing.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 13 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Michael Johnson

Recent changes in the UK political landscape have brought about cuts in public sector spending. Local authorities, in common with other public sector agencies, are…

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1922

Abstract

Purpose

Recent changes in the UK political landscape have brought about cuts in public sector spending. Local authorities, in common with other public sector agencies, are required to make significant cost savings over the coming years. Procurement is an area of public sector administration characterised by considerable costs and inefficiency where the adoption of innovative technologies, such as e‐markets, can be deployed to effect significant costs savings. However, there are many barriers to the adoption of such technologies. The purpose of this paper is to explore and expound the factors that impede local authorities from adopting e‐markets and to present a learning opportunity for procurement managers and other stakeholders involved in technology adoption in local government and the wider public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study based on in depth interviews with 17 senior level executives in e‐markets and local authorities on barriers to e‐market adoption in the local government sector is presented. The interviews were transcribed and subsequently coded and analysed using the qualitative data analysis software QSR N6.

Findings

A number of factors (risk perception, knowledge deficits, trust, firm size, and organisational readiness) pertaining to Johnson's framework of e‐market adoption barriers were found to affect e‐market adoption and use in the local government sector. Importantly, the study also found factors that are idiosyncratic to the sector that impinged on e‐market adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the study is limited to examining such barriers from a buy‐side local authority perspective, the findings of which may have implications for the adoption of e‐markets and other e‐procurement technologies in the wider public sector and beyond. The paper also makes a contribution to the literature on e‐market adoption by adding to the body of knowledge relating to institutional theory.

Practical implications

The case study can help local authority and other public sector procurement managers, academic researchers, practitioners, consultants and other professionals involved in technology adoption better understand, and find practical ways to offset, the barriers that impinge on the adoption of e‐markets and other innovative technologies that can reduce costs within public sector organisations.

Originality/value

E‐market adoption has the potential to realise a number of significant cost saving benefits within and between organisations. However, such benefits cannot be realised if there are barriers to their adoption and full utilisation. To date, research on the dynamics of e‐market adoption has largely focused on private sector enterprises with few studies examining this phenomenon in public sector environments. Therefore, e‐market adoption in the public sector has received limited attention in the literature over the past decade. This study examines, and provides empirical evidence of, barriers to e‐market uptake and usage in the local government sector in order to act as a starting point to creating better understanding of such barriers among academic and practitioner audiences.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

John R. Calvert

Public sector bargaining in Canadian labourrelations, placed in the wider context of the federalpolitical system, is examined. The developmentof public sector trade…

Abstract

Public sector bargaining in Canadian labour relations, placed in the wider context of the federal political system, is examined. The development of public sector trade unionism over the past two decades is discussed and its impact on the wider labour movements is assessed. It is argued that the prospects for public sector unionism look bleak, as both provincial and federal governments are expected to establish a more favourable investment climate for the private sector, thus curtailing public spending, restraining wages of public employees and rights of public sector unions.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Tri Jatmiko Wahyu Prabowo, Philomena Leung and James Guthrie

This paper examines whether public sector reforms in a developing country is consistent with the principles of new public management (NPM). It examines whether Indonesian…

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1926

Abstract

This paper examines whether public sector reforms in a developing country is consistent with the principles of new public management (NPM). It examines whether Indonesian public sector reforms from the late 1990s to 2015, specifically the adoption of accrual accounting, are motivated by NPM philosophy. Reviewing and analysing Government regulations and reports, the study finds that the reforms are an attempt to implement NPM, specifically in relation to five financial management aspects (i.e. market-oriented, budgeting, performance management, financial reporting and auditing systems). However, the reforms are inconsistent with the NPM philosophy of efficiency and effectiveness in public service provisions. By requiring the use of the existing system, the reforms actually created inefficiency. This research is novel in investigating the gap between 'ideal concepts' and examining practices in an emerging country context.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Zakareya Ebrahim and Zahir Irani

To provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government that represents the alignment of IT infrastructure with business process management in public sector

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14408

Abstract

Purpose

To provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government that represents the alignment of IT infrastructure with business process management in public sector organisations and classify the barriers that might complicate the implementation of the proposed architecture framework. The study will help IT practitioners in the public sector learn how to use and manage information technologies to revitalise business processes, improve decision‐making, and gain a competitive advantage from the adoption of e‐government. The proposed architecture framework for e‐government adoption will reduce confusion surrounding e‐government infrastructure in the public sector through understanding the implementation processes, identifying requirements of information and communications technology tools, highlighting the importance of the organisational management resources and the impact of barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of earlier studies have been critically examined and analysed to provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government adoption that can address and identify the standards, infrastructure components, applications, and technologies for e‐government. The authors have divided the architecture framework into four layers; access layer, e‐government layer, e‐business layer, and infrastructure layer; each layer addresses a particular aspect of e‐government architecture. This paper then presents a critical analysis of barriers experienced in public sector organisations, which prevent the successful adoption of e‐government; such barriers being presented in a taxonomy.

Findings

Defined organisational and technological requirements that will be necessary for the adoption of e‐government in public sector organisations through construct an integrated architecture framework for e‐government. The difficulties and barriers that have been experienced in public sector organisations which complicate the implementation process of e‐government have been analysed and then identified and presented in a taxonomy.

Originality/value

The paper provides architecture framework for e‐government adoption that can help to guide IT managers recognise the technological and organisational requirements for e‐government adoption in public sector organisations. The framework can also help the decision makers to set a vision statement and strategic action plan for future direction in the information technology age through identifying key elements and stages for action. The authors also identify and classify the perceived barriers that might complicate the implementation process of e‐government projects. The awareness of these barriers is important for any e‐government project since they will alert the e‐government project team with any problems or challenges might be existed during the implementation process so they will be ready to overcome them.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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