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Article

Weidong Zhu, Yufei Tian, Xue Hu, Quan Ku and Xiaoya Dai

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the pattern between government innovation funding and enterprise value creation. Many factors, including government innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the pattern between government innovation funding and enterprise value creation. Many factors, including government innovation funding, R&D ability, corporate governance and some company characteristics significantly affected the efficiency of firm value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposed a novel methodology based on clustering-rough sets to explore the characteristics of enterprise value creation behavior, and map the relationship between government innovation funding and enterprise value creation. The agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) algorithm were used to classify firm performance and get two types of value creation efficiencies and to discretize condition attributes because the rough set theory cannot deal with continuous attributes. This paper utilized the rough sets method to realize data mining and get rules of government innovation funding and enterprise value creation.

Findings

R&D ability, proportion of independent directors, remuneration of directors, operating revenue, number of employees, price-earnings ratio, quick ratio, capital intensity and ROA were important to identify firm value creation efficiency when government funded the firms. Firms of high level of government innovation funding, high lagged R&D ratio, high remuneration of directors, low price-earnings ratio, low quick ratio, moderate capital intensity and high ROA were more likely to have high efficiency of value creation.

Originality/value

Since China implemented the innovation-driven development strategy, facilitating enterprise innovation has become an important way to achieve high-quality economic growth. With constantly increasing of Chinese government innovation funding, studying on the effect of government innovation funding on firm’s value creation is significant to improve the efficiency of government resource allocation. It is valuable to reveal the pattern between government innovation funding and enterprise value creation based on the value added theory. The rules obtained could be used to provide decision-making support to improve the efficiency of government innovation funding and prevent waste of government resources effectively.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article

Craig Campbell and Lyndsay Connors

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the history of national education policy through an interview with one of its significant makers and critics, Lyndsay Connors, a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the history of national education policy through an interview with one of its significant makers and critics, Lyndsay Connors, a former Australian Schools Commissioner.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper occurs as an interview. The text is based on a revised conversation held as an event of the Australian and New Zealand History of Education Conference held at the University of Canberra, on 26 September 2017.

Findings

Australian educational policy is peculiarly complex, and apparently “irrational”. This appears especially so in relation to the government, tax-raised, funding of government and non-government schools. A combination of the peculiarities of Australian federalism in relation to education, political expediency, popular exhaustion with the “state aid” debate, the power of entrenched interest groups and the distancing of democratic decision making from the decision-making process in relation to education all play a part.

Originality/value

The originality of this contribution to a research journal lies in its combination of autobiography with historical policy analysis.

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Article

Deborah Kelly and Alfred Lewis

This article aims to examine the dynamic nature of the sources of funding for not‐for‐profit (NPs) organizations with particular reference to NPs in the human service…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine the dynamic nature of the sources of funding for not‐for‐profit (NPs) organizations with particular reference to NPs in the human service sector NPs in the US.

Design/methodology/approach

The universe of NPs include government and so‐called third sector organizations which such as charities, healthcare organizations, educational institutions and disaster relief organizations. Specifically the authors examined the human service sector of NPs with the aim of analyzing the relationships between government subsidy and the level of commercial activities of NPs.

Findings

The expectation is that NPs with greater level of commercial of for‐profit type activities are better managed than NPs that are solely reliant on government subsidies.

Originality/value

This article examines the dynamic nature of the sources of funding for not‐for‐profit (NPs) organizations with particular reference to NPs in the human service sector NPs in the US.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article

Brendan O'Dwyer and Roel Boomsma

The purpose of this paper is to deepen and advance the understanding of the construction of accountability within the relationship between government funders and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen and advance the understanding of the construction of accountability within the relationship between government funders and development non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study examining the process through which an influential Dutch development NGO, Oxfam Novib, constructed its own accountability while simultaneously seeking to influence shifts in government funder accountability requirements. It enrols a combination of comprehensive archival data on the Dutch government’s financing scheme for NGOs from 1965 to 2012 and in-depth interviews with Oxfam Novib managers and Dutch government officials. The co-evolution in accountability within Oxfam Novib and the government funding scheme is conceptualised using the notions of imposed, felt and adaptive accountability

Findings

The case unveils the dynamics through which accountability within a major government funding scheme for NGOs was co-constructed by Oxfam Novib and the Dutch government’s development aid department. In particular, it reveals how this process was influenced by an internal evolution in Oxfam Novib’s organisational approach to accountability and an institutional context characterised by consensus-based economic and social policy making. The case also unveils the process through which Oxfam Novib’s influence declined as more demanding, narrowly focused government accountability requirements emerged in a setting that was increasingly critical of NGOs.

Originality/value

The paper presents a rare example of a context where development NGOs have proactively sought and secured influence over the accountability demands of a key donor. It is unique in combining consideration of the internal evolution of accountability within an individual NGO (conceptualised as an evolution from felt to adaptive accountability) with a progression in the form of accountability required by governmental funders. The paper unveils the conditions under which NGO-preferred conceptions of accountability may gain (and lose) influence among key funders.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Rose B. Okiy

To address the issue of poor government funding for Nigerian libraries. This situation has led many librarians over the years to explore the possibility of raising…

Abstract

Purpose

To address the issue of poor government funding for Nigerian libraries. This situation has led many librarians over the years to explore the possibility of raising additional funds from alternative sources of income.

Design/methodology/approach

Explores the current levels of funding for Nigerian academic libraries and identifies some alternative funding sources. On identifying these sources, the success of alternative sources of income is presented and suggestions are made for funding in the future.

Findings

Funding for libraries and information centers in Nigeria is largely through government allocations to the overseeing ministries or institutions. Government funding has been poor, requiring libraries to look for alternative sources of income in order to meet the increasingly sophisticated demand of library users for electronic information services. Several methods for generating income have been identified, explored by many libraries, and discussed in library literature, but have yielded little in the way of additional funding.

Originality/value

On evaluating all the sources of income available to Nigerian academic libraries, this paper suggests that the most stable and reliable source of funds remains with allocations from the federal government. As the support from the government has not been adequate, suggestions are included on areas where the government could raise taxes to support education in general, and libraries specifically, within Nigeria.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Book part

Cass Hausserman, Susan Jurney and Timothy Rupert

We experimentally investigate how the level of government (either federal or state) and whether funding is being allocated to enforcement or service efforts in a revenue…

Abstract

We experimentally investigate how the level of government (either federal or state) and whether funding is being allocated to enforcement or service efforts in a revenue agency affects trust in the agency, as well as support for the funding initiative. We find that the two independent variables interact, such that trust in the state agency is not affected by whether the proposed funding would be allocated to service or enforcement efforts. But, at the federal level (the Internal Revenue Service), trust in the agency is significantly higher when the proposed funding is to hire additional service employees as opposed to hiring additional enforcement employees. We also find that the level of government moderates the mediating effect of trust in the agency on the relation between the use of funds and support for the funding.

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Book part

Joshua Sarpong, Sean Sturm and Cathy Gunn

In the era of the knowledge economy, universities are expected to contribute to the economic development of their countries. Therefore, their research agendas must be…

Abstract

In the era of the knowledge economy, universities are expected to contribute to the economic development of their countries. Therefore, their research agendas must be relevant to the local context and geared, though not uncritically, to the national educational agenda. To do this diligently requires research autonomy. However, due to the low government investment in research on the African continent, universities have had to rely on other sources of funding, which usually come with strings attached. Our study investigates the case of Ghana, in particular, the University of Ghana, the leading research university in the country. We drew on resource dependence theory, which suggests that, despite external pressures on universities, they can enhance their autonomy through the implementation of strategic measures. Primarily, we analyzed documents such as research reports, journal articles and speeches in the light of Clark’s (1998) model of the “entrepreneurial university,” which, if adapted with care and in a localized form in Ghana, may contribute to the research autonomy of its universities. We found that, although research autonomy in Ghanaian universities is limited due to their over-reliance on external donor funding, it is likely to be strengthened if the government of Ghana follows through on plans to increase research funding and universities continue with measures to diversify their funding sources.

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Article

Helen Irvine and Christine Ryan

In the context of the Australian Government’s attempts to impose budget austerity measures on publicly funded universities in its higher education sector, the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of the Australian Government’s attempts to impose budget austerity measures on publicly funded universities in its higher education sector, the purpose of this paper is to assess the sector’s financial health.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi-dimensional study is based on seven years of government financial data from all 39 publicly funded Australian universities, supplemented by information from universities’ annual reports. Using a financial health model that reflects vulnerability, viability and resilience, the authors examine sector data using a suite of metrics. The authors analyse differences between those universities in the Top 10 and Bottom 10 by revenue, as a window into the financial health of the sector at large.

Findings

While mostly financially viable, the sector shows signs of financial vulnerability, particularly in the areas of expense control and financial sustainability. Possibly in response to an uncertain funding environment, universities are managing long-term liquidity by growing reserves. Debt represents largely untapped potential for universities, while differences between the Top 10 and Bottom 10 universities were most evident in the area of revenue diversity, a strong predictor of financial viability.

Research limitations/implications

Focussing on a specific set of financial metrics limits the scope of the study, but highlights further research possibilities. These include more detailed statistical analysis of data, financial case studies of individual universities and the implications of revenue diversification on academic standards.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to higher education literature, providing empirical evidence of universities’ finances. It highlights the importance of universities’ financial resilience in an uncertain funding environment.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Obiageri Monica Ugwu-oju, A. Vincent Onodugo and Chigozie Paulinus Mbah

This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of government funding schemes for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of government funding schemes for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey method of inquiry was adopted, wherein a structured questionnaire was used to generate data. Using Guilford and Flruchter (1973) formula, a sample size of 276 was derived from a population of 890 registered SMEs. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 20.0 tools.

Findings

The results of the analysis reveal that a significant number of SMEs were aware of government funding schemes, but insignificant number succeeded in accessing the funds. It further reveals that the nature and conditionality of the funds and management capacity of SMEs were major hindrances to the effectiveness of the funding schemes.

Originality/value

The inquiry is completely original and has the potency of influencing policy formulation and implementation in the area of industrial funding.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article

Lee Hue Kyung, Youm Hyun Duk, Kim Si Jeoung and Suh Yoon Kyo

This paper aims to determine the mediating effects of government-funded research and development (R&D) projects in the relationship between the competence factors of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the mediating effects of government-funded research and development (R&D) projects in the relationship between the competence factors of universities and the performance of university–industry cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has been conducted to analyze the mediating effect of government- and enterprise-funded R&D projects in consideration of the performance during university–industry cooperative projects. In this study, a three-step analysis of the mediating effects (Baron and Kenny, 1986) and Sobel Test are taken for the empirical analysis.

Findings

In the result, R&D funding from the central government partially mediates the performance of university–industry cooperation when the research capacity of the full-time faculty and the size of the Technical Licensing Office (TLO) are taken as independent variables. R&D funding from the central government does not mediate university–industry cooperation when the size of the center for university–industry cooperation is an independent variable. However, R&D funding from a local government does not mediate the performance of university–industry cooperative projects for any chosen independent variables. The results of this study suggest a direction for governmental funding in R&D projects to promote performance during university–industry cooperation. Another requirement is for universities to expand their research capacity and the operations of their TLO.

Originality/value

The majority of former research studies on university–industry cooperation and its performance have focused on the university’s research capacity, the competence of the TLO and the traits of the university.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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