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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2013

Johan M.G. van der Dennen

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter contributes to comparative biopolitics and reviews primatological literature, especially about our nearest relatives, the Great Apes.

Design/methodology/approach – Biopolitics in this chapter means evolutionarily informed political science, with emphasis on power relations. I review the literature on intrasexual and intersexual dominance interactions among individuals and competitive and/or agonistic interactions among groups in the Great Apes (Hominidae, formerly Pongidae): orangutan (Pongo with two species and three subspecies), gorilla (Gorilla with four subspecies), bonobo (Pan paniscus), and common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes with four subspecies). In the final section I present some (speculative) thoughts on Pan prior or the modern human ancestor.

Findings – Not only Man is a political animal.

Originality/value – Impartial, objective, and as complete as possible review of the literature for the students of (comparative) politics, ethology, and psychology.

Details

The world of biology and politics: Organization and research areas
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-728-3

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Book part
Publication date: 14 June 2012

Judith Benz-Schwarzburg and Sophia Benz

Purpose – This study addresses the great apes' fatal situation in the wild by integrating perspectives from conservation biology, conflict research, and bioethics.

Abstract

Purpose – This study addresses the great apes' fatal situation in the wild by integrating perspectives from conservation biology, conflict research, and bioethics.

Design/methodology/approach – We introduce the great apes' red list status and describe habitat destruction and bushmeat commerce as main threats to their survival. We analyze the complex context in which great ape extinction takes place in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and thereby focus on a threatening factor that is interlinked with habitat destruction and bushmeat commerce: armed conflict.

Findings – The study shows that some characteristics of so-called “New Wars” are apparent in the DRC and that they directly or indirectly impact the great apes' situation. Because the human role in the animals' extinction is so severe and so obvious, ethical consequences become apparent. Animal ethics (the welfare as well as the rights approach) has to acknowledge the severity of the situation of the great apes in the wild. Implications for the human–animal relationship and the human identity come into play. After all, we have to ask ourselves what it means for us and for coming generations if our nearest relatives are going to be extinct one day.

Practical implications – It is argued that conservation policy has to include insights from conflict research. Likewise, peacemaking has to address ecological consequences of warfare.

Originality/value – Our findings promote an interdisciplinary approach. Armed conflict as a threatening factor to great ape survival has so far largely been neglected within the literature on conservation biology as well as in conflict research.

Details

Biopolicy: The Life Sciences and Public Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-821-2

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Grant Shirley, Emma Wylie and Wardlow Friesen

There are a large number of destinations in which post-conflict tourism (PCT) might be a relevant development option. This chapter considers four destinations which have…

Abstract

There are a large number of destinations in which post-conflict tourism (PCT) might be a relevant development option. This chapter considers four destinations which have opted to use the PCT brand as part of their strategies to attract tourists. These destinations – Cambodia, Nicaragua, Rwanda and Bougainville (within the country of Papua New Guinea) – are on four different continents, had conflicts which ended in the last decade of the twentieth century and represent tourism industries at different stages of development. They were also chosen because they are at low or medium levels of development and have relatively small populations of less than 20 million people. The chapter considers the different ways in which PCT is or might be used not only to provide economic opportunities for local residents, but also as a means towards reconciliation, healing and recovery after conflicts which have resulted in many casualties and divided the people against each other. Each of the case study destinations have attempted to turn a negative aspect of their histories into an opportunity for development, with differing levels of success.

Details

The Tourism–Disaster–Conflict Nexus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-100-3

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Liam Fahey

Abstract

Details

The Insight Discipline: Crafting New Marketplace Understanding that Makes a Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-733-4

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Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Forms the first of two articles examining how the unusual organizational culture contributes to business success at business‐transformation and people‐development company Impact.

Abstract

Purpose

Forms the first of two articles examining how the unusual organizational culture contributes to business success at business‐transformation and people‐development company Impact.

Design/methodology/approach

Focuses on some of the ways in which the company recruits and retains top talent. Details the 24‐hour selection events for possible new training consultants, the two‐week induction process, the culture of fairness the company emphasizes and the challenging projects it can offer to employees.

Findings

Reveals that staff turnover is low, at around 7 percent a year, and job satisfaction is high at this Financial Times Best Company to Work For organization.

Practical implications

Reaffirms that low employee turnover helps organizations to win and retain clients.

Originality/value

Gets inside an organization where “people are our greatest asset” is more than simply a mantra.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

J.R. Nicholls

The food industry's managerial response to the environmental change of EC accession is examined. Nine case studies had been carried out in the late 1970s and the same nine…

Abstract

The food industry's managerial response to the environmental change of EC accession is examined. Nine case studies had been carried out in the late 1970s and the same nine companies have been recently revisited to provide a longitudinal study. As we approach “1992”, EC issues have again become strategic.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2019

Ildephonse Musafili, Jean Chrysostome Ngabitsinze, Fidèle Niyitanga and Dave Weatherspoon

Policymakers and stakeholders lack empirical evidence on the effectiveness of community participatory management for agribusiness development and environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

Policymakers and stakeholders lack empirical evidence on the effectiveness of community participatory management for agribusiness development and environmental conservation. The purpose of this paper is to assess the management preferences, approaches and practices of farm communities in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park (VNP).

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data collected from 191 farmers were used. A choice experiment on current and potential park management practices and utilization levels was conducted along with a survey on socioeconomic, farm and institutional behavior characteristics.

Findings

Results show that farmers prefer preserving VNP resources for the production of agribusiness crops that are low input and environmental friendly and provide high income to farmers in addition to handcraft production to enhance cultural, plant and wild animal tourism development. Farmers highly value integrated stakeholder participatory decision making about the parks natural resources. High-income farmers prefer to restore traditional cultural heritage park sites for recreation, and ancestral intellectual and cultural property rights.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size limited the analysis to a conditional logit model.

Originality/value

This is the first study to assess the management preferences of farm communities in the VNP area.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Elio Frattaroli

Hamlet, Shakespeare's Everyman, is used to describe how paying heed to disturbing emotions can be used as a starting point for ‘healing the soul’. With reference to the…

Abstract

Hamlet, Shakespeare's Everyman, is used to describe how paying heed to disturbing emotions can be used as a starting point for ‘healing the soul’. With reference to the events of September 11 2001, the author explores how quick‐fix reactions are likely to bring only short‐term solutions, whereas resolving difficult problems requires a ‘blessed feeling of connectedness’ with deeper feelings.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Elizabeth Choinski

An average person's memory of the last biology book he or she has read is likely one of a dry tome lugged back and forth to a high school or college biology class. “Good…

Abstract

An average person's memory of the last biology book he or she has read is likely one of a dry tome lugged back and forth to a high school or college biology class. “Good books” and “biology” are not naturally linked in people's minds. This is an unfortunate occurrence, but one that is easily remedied. For anyone with a little curiosity about biology and a penchant for good books, the following bibliography provides some guidance. All but one of the authors included are or were trained as scientists. They all have a couple of traits in common, namely a passion for their work and a desire to share this passion with anyone who will listen. It is our good fortune that they are also excellent writers.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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