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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1969

L.J. Danckwerts, John Stephenson J. and Gordon Willmer

May 6, 1969 Building — Safety regulations — Application — “Affect” — Workman's presence in particular place not reasonably foreseeable by employer — Whether workman…

Abstract

May 6, 1969 Building — Safety regulations — Application — “Affect” — Workman's presence in particular place not reasonably foreseeable by employer — Whether workman affected by regulations — Workman not expressly forbidden to go to place in question — Whether impliedly authorised or permitted to be there — Workman's presence there unforeseeably foolish — Whether resulting accident entirely own fault — Liability of employers — Building (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations, 1948 (S.I. 1948, No. 1145), regs. 4(1), 27(2), 28(1).

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Managerial Law, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1970

Fenton Atkinson, L.J. Karminski and Gordon Willmer

October 24, 1969 Factory — Statutory duty — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving work‐piece and…

Abstract

October 24, 1969 Factory — Statutory duty — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving work‐piece and stationary bar — Automatic cooling device — Danger arising from coolant applied by hand — Practice known to employers — Whether foreseeable — Whether duty to fence — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c. 34), s. 14(1).

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Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1970

L.J. Winn, L.J. Karminski and Gordon Willmer

March 19, 1970 Building — Safety Regulations — Scaffold — Left “partly … dismantled” — Workman properly provided with trestles — User of scaffold for balancing — Whether…

Abstract

March 19, 1970 Building — Safety Regulations — Scaffold — Left “partly … dismantled” — Workman properly provided with trestles — User of scaffold for balancing — Whether scaffold “capable of being used” — Construction (Working Places) Regulations, 1966 (S.I. 1966, No. 94), regs. 4, 7, 12.

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Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

Denning, L.J. Megaw and Gordon Willmer

November 7, 1972 Industrial Relations — Unfair dismissal — Statutory compensation — Month's notice of dismissal given before coming into force of statutory protection …

Abstract

November 7, 1972 Industrial Relations — Unfair dismissal — Statutory compensation — Month's notice of dismissal given before coming into force of statutory protection — Notice expiring after provisions in force — Whether contract of employment terminated when notice given or when expiring — Whether jurisdiction to award compen‐sation for unfair dismissal where period of notice straddling date of coming into force of statutory protection — Act with retrospective effect — No room for interpreting clear words to avoid retrospective effect — Industrial Relations Act 1971 (c.72) ss. 22,23(2)(a)(3), 167.

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Managerial Law, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1969

M.R. Denning, Edmund Davies and Gordon Willmer

October 14, 1969 Master and Servant — Negligence — Duty of care — Workman required to work with detergents — Risk of dermatitis — Foreseeability — Employer's duty.

Abstract

October 14, 1969 Master and Servant — Negligence — Duty of care — Workman required to work with detergents — Risk of dermatitis — Foreseeability — Employer's duty.

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Managerial Law, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1971

Hailsham L.C. of St. Marylebone, Hodson, Viscount Dilhome, Donovan and Gardiner

October 21, 1970 Factory — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving workpiece and imperceptibly…

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Abstract

October 21, 1970 Factory — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving workpiece and imperceptibly moving boring bar — Automatic cooling device — Coolant applied by hand — Practice known to employers — Workman's hand caught in “nip” — Whether duty on employers to fence boring bar — Whether dangerous part of machinery — Danger of accident foreseen by employers — Whether foreseeable — Workman unable to establish exactly how accident happened — Materiality — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c.34), s.14 (1).

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Managerial Law, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1970

J. Rees

June 26,1970 Damages — Personal injuries — Assessment — Nervous shock and personality change — Man crushed by crane being operated by plaintiff in course of employment …

Abstract

June 26,1970 Damages — Personal injuries — Assessment — Nervous shock and personality change — Man crushed by crane being operated by plaintiff in course of employment — Liability for accident admitted by plaintiffs employers — Effect on plaintiff — Loss of amenities and depressive illness — Appropriate sum to be awarded as general damages.

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Managerial Law, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Fumes, grit, dust, dirt—all have long been recognized as occupational hazards, their seriousness depending on their nature and how they assail the human body, by…

Abstract

Fumes, grit, dust, dirt—all have long been recognized as occupational hazards, their seriousness depending on their nature and how they assail the human body, by ingestion, absorption, inhalation, the last being considered the most likely to cause permanent damage. It would not be an exaggeration to state that National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) provisions, now contained in the Social Security Act, 1975, with all the regulations made to implement the law, had their birth in compensating victims of lung disease from inhalation of dust. Over the years, the range of recognized dust disease, prescribed under regulations, has grown, but there are other recognized risks to human life and health from dusts of various kinds, produced not from the manufacturing, mining and quarrying, &c. industries; but from a number of areas where it can contaminate and constitute a hazard to vulnerable products and persons. An early intervention by legislation concerned exposed foods, e.g. uncovered meat on open shop fronts, to dust and in narrow streets, mud splashed from road surfaces. The composition of dust varies with its sources—external, atmospheric, seasonal or interior sources, uses and occupations, comings and goings, and in particular, the standards of cleaning and, where necessary, precautions to prevent dust accumulation. One area for long under constant scrutiny and a subject of considerable research is the interior of hospital wards, treatment rooms and operating theatres.

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British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1966

L.J. Willmer, L.J. Winn and J. Scarman

June 27, 1966 Damages — Personal injuries — Future uncertainty — Brain damage — Minor epilepsy controlled by drugs — 50/ 50 chance of major epilepsy developing — Whether…

Abstract

June 27, 1966 Damages — Personal injuries — Future uncertainty — Brain damage — Minor epilepsy controlled by drugs — 50/ 50 chance of major epilepsy developing — Whether £8,000 proper sum — No prognosis until five years after accident — Suitable case for postponement of hearing — R.S.C., Ord.36, r.34; Ord.35b, r.2.

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Managerial Law, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

M.A.P. WILLMER

The traditional measure of detective performance is the clear‐up rate. Though this has the merit of being easy to calculate, it is not without certain disadvantages. At…

Abstract

The traditional measure of detective performance is the clear‐up rate. Though this has the merit of being easy to calculate, it is not without certain disadvantages. At present, a detective may take great pains with work generally considered to be of a high standard only to find that his efforts are reflected by no change in the clear‐up rate—or even by a decrease in the clear‐up rate. This paper shows how concepts drawn from information theory may be used as the basis of a measure that does not suffer from such inconsistencies.

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Kybernetes, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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