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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Gordon H.G. McDougall and Douglas W. Snetsinger

Explains how tangibility can be a useful concept for the servicesmarketer, enabling a firm to identify its position relative tocompetition by measuring tangibility at…

Abstract

Explains how tangibility can be a useful concept for the services marketer, enabling a firm to identify its position relative to competition by measuring tangibility at various levels such as product class, brand, segment and thus develop specific strategies for improvement. Provides a scale, based on three empirical studies, for measuring tangibility and shows how the results can be used strategically.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000001507. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000001507. When citing the article, please cite: Gordon McDougall, (1989), “Barossa Winery: Penetrating the International Market”, International Marketing Review, Vol. 6 Iss 2.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Gordon McDougall

With the “internationalisation” of tastes amongst wineconsumers, the need to export wine has become ever more acute for wineproducers worldwide. As an example of how wine…

Abstract

With the “internationalisation” of tastes amongst wine consumers, the need to export wine has become ever more acute for wine producers worldwide. As an example of how wine producers have attempted to gain access to overseas markets, this case study examines the export drive of a major Australian winery.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Gordon H.G. McDougall and Terrence Levesque

This research investigated the relationship between three elements – core service quality, relational service quality‐ and perceived value – and customer satisfaction and…

Abstract

This research investigated the relationship between three elements – core service quality, relational service quality‐ and perceived value – and customer satisfaction and future intentions across four services. The results revealed that core service quality (the promise) and perceived value were the most important drivers of customer satisfaction with relational service quality (the delivery) a significant but less important driver. A direct link between customer satisfaction and future intentions was established. The relative importance of the three drivers of satisfaction varied among services. Specifically, the importance of core service quality and perceived value was reversed depending on the service. A major conclusion was that both perceived value and service quality dimensions should be incorporated into customer satisfaction models to provide a more complete picture of the drivers of satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Gordon McDougall and Larry Lockshin

The Tanunda Winery is a made‐up company facing a series of real world wine marketing issues. It has been successful domestically, but has not really looked to the global…

Abstract

The Tanunda Winery is a made‐up company facing a series of real world wine marketing issues. It has been successful domestically, but has not really looked to the global marketplace for growth. This case focuses on the decisions a medium sized winery must face when assessing the international marketplace and deciding which countries to enter. The case provides a reasonable amount of internal data for a medium‐sized (10,000–15,000 ton) winery, including financial and cost data. The case provides a great deal of information about the Australian wine industry and four of the most important wine export markets: the UK, the US, Canada, and Japan. Students can assess the opportunities available to Tanunda Winery and engage in real world cost‐benefit analysis in deciding which and how many countries to export to.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Terrence Levesque and Gordon H.G. McDougall

Points out that customer satisfaction and retention are critical for retail banks, and investigates the major determinants of customer satisfaction and future intentions…

Abstract

Points out that customer satisfaction and retention are critical for retail banks, and investigates the major determinants of customer satisfaction and future intentions in the retail bank sector. Identifies the determinants which include service quality dimensions (e.g. getting it right the first time), service features (e.g. competitive interest rates), service problems, service recovery and products used. Finds, in particular, that service problems and the bank’s service recovery ability have a major impact on customer satisfaction and intentions to switch.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Gordon H.G. McDougall, Terrence Levesque and Peter VanderPlaat

When designing a guarantee, service firms have a choice ‐the unconditional that guarantees customer satisfaction or the specific, which guarantees a major aspect of the…

Abstract

When designing a guarantee, service firms have a choice ‐the unconditional that guarantees customer satisfaction or the specific, which guarantees a major aspect of the service such as on‐time delivery. To date, this decision has been based primarily on anecdotal observations. This investigation examined consumer reactions to unconditional versus specific service guarantees in terms of risk reduction, preference, and trust in the service provider. In an experimental setting, respondents preferred firms which offered an unconditional guarantee. However, specific guarantees were favoured when subjects considered the ease of getting their money back. For a service firm, the implementation of an unconditional guarantee with a specific payout would have the broadest appeal in the market.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Harvir S. Bansal, Gordon H.G. McDougall, Shane S. Dikolli and Karen L. Sedatole

Prior work has examined antecedents and behavioral outcomes of satisfaction in an offline setting but few studies explore whether the findings hold for increasingly…

Abstract

Prior work has examined antecedents and behavioral outcomes of satisfaction in an offline setting but few studies explore whether the findings hold for increasingly important online settings. This paper extends the prior work to explore the antecedents of e‐satisfaction and the relations between e‐satisfaction and two new behaviorial outcomes related to an online setting; customers' stated purchasing behavior (i.e. conversion) and actual browsing behavior (i.e. stickiness). Using a sample of 145 predominantly multi‐channel retail firms, the paper highlights two main results. First, existing models that examine the antecedents and consequences of satisfaction in the offline setting, also apply to an online setting. Second, Web site characteristics had a significant impact on all three types of behavioral outcomes, while Web site customer service was a significant driver of only retention/referral outcomes. Further, Web site customer service may be a necessary but not sufficient condition to achieving favourable outcomes in online settings.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Chatura Ranaweera, Harvir Bansal and Gordon McDougall

A main focus in recent online consumer research has been on context specific trust, risk, and online buying experience. Despite the importance, their individual level…

Abstract

Purpose

A main focus in recent online consumer research has been on context specific trust, risk, and online buying experience. Despite the importance, their individual level “equivalents” – trust disposition, risk aversion, and technology readiness – have received limited attention. This research attempts to fill that gap by focussing on these crucial personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a survey‐based method to test a theoretically grounded set of hypotheses. The measurement model is tested using SEM and the hypotheses are tested using regression techniques.

Findings

The personality characteristics are found to have significant moderating effects on online purchase intentions. Interestingly, provided the consumers are satisfied, risk aversion is found to increase the likelihood of purchase. Moreover, while technology readiness increases the likelihood of online purchase, dispositional trust is found not to have a similar effect.

Research limitations/implications

Significant full and quasi moderator effects of three hitherto untested personality traits on online purchase behaviour are found. Results show that risk aversion, trust disposition, and technology readiness are fundamental to online consumer behaviour literature.

Practical implications

The results suggest that to be successful, relatively unknown web‐based service providers need to go beyond matching their large competitor and need to offer unique web sites to browsers. Results also indicate that personality traits pose both significant challenges as well as unexpected opportunities to online service providers in identifying inherently more loyal customers.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a set of hither to untested personality traits that have fundamental relevance to online consumer behaviour. It also offers practical recommendations to relatively unknown online service providers on how to compete with their better known competitors. Results are generalisable to online service providers in a number of industries.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Larry Lockshin and Gordon McDougall

A range of wine retailers identified critical incidents that had occurred with their suppliers. The resulting classification of the problems differed from previous…

Abstract

A range of wine retailers identified critical incidents that had occurred with their suppliers. The resulting classification of the problems differed from previous consumer studies by revealing primarily outcome problems, such as timeliness of delivery or delivery of complete order, rather than process‐based problems. The critical incident technique provided sufficient information to evaluate the suppliers’ recovery strategies. The effectiveness of recovery strategies was influenced by whether the problem was solved and the time and number of calls required to solve the problem. A major implication for managers in this industry was to anticipate potential difficulties and inform their customers. This proactive strategy would improve relationships with buyers and reduce defections.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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