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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2013

Elena Corradini

Using document analysis and surveys this chapter presents a case study about a new master’s degree program in library and information science and its curriculum which was…

Abstract

Using document analysis and surveys this chapter presents a case study about a new master’s degree program in library and information science and its curriculum which was developed cooperatively from 2009 through 2012 by four EU higher education institutions for, and with, universities in three former Soviet countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia. Events that led to the collaboration are presented along with how faculty members were taught to teach new courses. It also discusses findings and results of an assessment of impact and satisfaction levels of the project. Stated project objectives and anticipated outcomes were compared with student expectations in order to provide a better understanding of the critical factors that might determine success of the new program. Although the project’s documentation was extensive, analysis and conclusions from it were limited to education and knowledge transfer goals of the program. Results from the study shed light on how to adjust course content to better meet student expectations and how to implement ongoing evaluation of courses at the international level. Since cooperation between institutions is always highly demanding, in particular when it is among institutions from different countries, the evaluation of this project will be of interest to anyone trying to improve cooperative agreements for educational purposes. Low response rates to the surveys limit the conclusions on general indications of effectiveness. This chapter provides only an early look at the impact of the program, and outcomes analysis based on a larger sample remains to be done.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1970

Fenton Atkinson, L.J. Karminski and Gordon Willmer

October 24, 1969 Factory — Statutory duty — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving work‐piece and…

Abstract

October 24, 1969 Factory — Statutory duty — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving work‐piece and stationary bar — Automatic cooling device — Danger arising from coolant applied by hand — Practice known to employers — Whether foreseeable — Whether duty to fence — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c. 34), s. 14(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Anne Cohn Donnelly and Charlotte Snyder

In January 2012, the Jane Addams Hull House Association—one of Chicago's largest and oldest social service agencies and arguably its most iconic—announced that it might…

Abstract

In January 2012, the Jane Addams Hull House Association—one of Chicago's largest and oldest social service agencies and arguably its most iconic—announced that it might have to close in the spring due to financial difficulties. Just days later, the 122-year-old organization stunned the philanthropic world when it laid off its employees without notice, declared its intention to liquidate in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and shut its doors forever. In the weeks that followed, more and more people began to ask: What had happened to the board? Had bankruptcy really been inevitable? This case chronicles the organization's final decade and enables students to step into the shoes of the chairman of the board, Steve Saunders, as he led the board through its last two years. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of effective boards and determine how internal and external factors contributed to Hull House's demise.

After reading and analyzing the case, students will be able to:

  • Describe the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards

  • Determine when the board is not performing its job and what the implications are for the organization

  • Evaluate ways in which the board might change in order to do a better job

  • Diagnose when external environmental factors threaten the security of a nonprofit and how the board itself might diagnose and work with such threats

Describe the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards

Determine when the board is not performing its job and what the implications are for the organization

Evaluate ways in which the board might change in order to do a better job

Diagnose when external environmental factors threaten the security of a nonprofit and how the board itself might diagnose and work with such threats

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Ian M. Johnson

This paper aims to review traditional forms of international support for developing schools of librarianship and information sciences, and traditional approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review traditional forms of international support for developing schools of librarianship and information sciences, and traditional approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The review draws evidence from the literature and the author's extensive international experience.

Findings

The study notes that the traditional approaches have not been entirely successful, and that the sources of support for these approaches are changing. In the light of the growth in the number of schools in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, it suggests that traditional approaches may not be practicable. Alternative approaches suggested in the past have included making teaching materials available, including access to them over the internet, but these may be no more appropriate or practicable. The paper then draws on recent research into the emergence of electronic publishing in Latin America. Whilst there are still flaws in the electronic publishing system, it may suggest a possible new way forward.

Practical implications

The challenge now is to determine how to facilitate similar support for developing schools of librarianship and information sciences internationally.

Originality/value

The paper challenges orthodox thinking about support for new schools of librarianship and information sciences in developing countries, and invites consideration of how new communications media could play a part in this process.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Ian M. Johnson

This paper identifies six major challenges facing the information profession as the “information society” emerges: assisting users to deal with information overload; the…

Abstract

This paper identifies six major challenges facing the information profession as the “information society” emerges: assisting users to deal with information overload; the high level of technical skills required to manage the new information and communication technologies; the competition with other professions for the management positions in converged library, information, and computing services; the need to incorporate a broader range of knowledge and skills, drawn from those traditionally seen as separate sectors of the information industry such as publishing; the need to develop a higher level of skills in teaching and facilitating the use of information; and the need for a greater ability to work with other people. It points to some solutions which have been adopted by schools of librarianship in the UK, many of them involving collaboration with other disciplines to produce the required depth of knowledge. It also calls for changes in the schools’ approach to teaching, learning, and research, and in the practitioner community’s support for education in general and continuing professional development in particular. Finally, it points to the dangers of inertia.

Details

Library Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2005

Tuula Gordon

Ethnographers in the field aim to familiarise themselves with processes and practices of local cultures in their chosen research setting. This usually means that they…

Abstract

Ethnographers in the field aim to familiarise themselves with processes and practices of local cultures in their chosen research setting. This usually means that they collect a wide range of data using diverse, multiple methods such as participant observation, interviewing and document collection. As we have suggested previously, the gaze of ethnographers often tends to be drawn to visible and audible activities; therefore, we also wanted to ask how to observe, record and analyse silence. We argued that it is more difficult for participant observers to focus on mundane everyday practices and stillness and silence than it is to record the use of voice and movement during lessons and breaks (Gordon, Holland, Lahelma, & Tolonen, 2005). Here, I shift the focus and examine how a researcher looks at what is eventful and striking in the field. Usually, in the course of a school day there are numerous incidents that are clearly visible to the ethnographer's gaze or loudly audible to her ears. I ask what strikes the researchers as particularly symptomatic among the many observations they make in the course of the day; why and how are some incidents interpreted as laden with significant meanings.

Details

Methodological Issues and Practices in Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-374-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

GORDON JOHNSON

OPERATING a mobile library service is not a subject currently considered in library schools to any great extent. Perhaps this is as things should be, for what the…

Abstract

OPERATING a mobile library service is not a subject currently considered in library schools to any great extent. Perhaps this is as things should be, for what the librarian in charge needs ideally is a course in transportation management, including a basic grounding in the mechanical aspects of vehicles.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1971

Gordon Johnson

IT WAS QUITE AN EVENT when the Americans brought off that tremendous gamble in 1969 and succeeded in landing two men on the moon and bringing them safely back. It was even…

Abstract

IT WAS QUITE AN EVENT when the Americans brought off that tremendous gamble in 1969 and succeeded in landing two men on the moon and bringing them safely back. It was even more of an event to find science‐fiction writers such as Ray Bradbury and Brian Aldiss brought specially on to TV programmes to add their comments on this feat. Ten or twenty years ago, this would have seemed ridiculous, an unheard‐of thing, as science‐fiction writers were obviously just pie‐in‐the‐sky dreamers who wrote imaginative rubbish!

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1973

Gordon Johnson

BOTH BRADBURY AND ASIMOV write science fiction. That statement is like saying that both the Financial Times and the News of the World are newspapers; they are worlds…

Abstract

BOTH BRADBURY AND ASIMOV write science fiction. That statement is like saying that both the Financial Times and the News of the World are newspapers; they are worlds apart. However, the contrast between the two may give some idea of the range in ideas, attitudes and approach to their subject.

Details

Library Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Gordon Johnson

MOST PEOPLE in the library world at some time in their lives get around to investigating the old family tree, partly out of some hope of finding an interesting hero or…

Abstract

MOST PEOPLE in the library world at some time in their lives get around to investigating the old family tree, partly out of some hope of finding an interesting hero or villain to brag about, and also as some kind of self‐imposed test of one's professional expertise. I am no exception.

Details

Library Review, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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