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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1989

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000004794. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000004794. When citing the article, please cite: Gordon E. Greenley, (1984), “An Understanding of Marketing Strategy”, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 18 Iss 6/7 pp. 90 - 103.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Gordon E. Greenley

This article focuses on the approaches that companies' marketing services take in the planning of their marketing operations, based on a recent survey of UK companies that…

Abstract

This article focuses on the approaches that companies' marketing services take in the planning of their marketing operations, based on a recent survey of UK companies that market services as opposed to physical products. Results indicated that the planning of the marketing operation in many service companies is not as well developed as it could be.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1986

Gordon E. Greenley and Alan S. Matcham

Focuses on a survey (and its results) carried out to investigate the marketing orientation of the companies who supply the UK's service of incoming tourism. Provides…

Abstract

Focuses on a survey (and its results) carried out to investigate the marketing orientation of the companies who supply the UK's service of incoming tourism. Provides indications from the survey results that there are indications of low levels of marketing orientation with the respondent companies in the service industry of incoming tourism relative to the UK. Presents four sections to add weight to the survey findings. First, outlines the results of a previous study as background to the present survey results. Second, discusses, briefly, the nature of the service of incoming tourism. Third, reports on the survey results and finally discusses and draws conclusions from the results and study. Summarizes and discusses the results in conclusion and considers that an initial base understanding has been developed by the surveys and urges further additional research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Gordon E. Greenley and Alan S. Matcham

Incoming tourism is one of Great Britain′s biggest revenue earners,but a previous study by the authors suggested that there was a low levelof marketing orientation in some…

Abstract

Incoming tourism is one of Great Britain′s biggest revenue earners, but a previous study by the authors suggested that there was a low level of marketing orientation in some of the companies which provide the service. The nature of incoming tourism is examined and a further study, by the authors, into the marketing orientation of some of the companies involved is reported. On the whole, this is found to be extremely low. The survey results are related to the nature of the industry itself. The question as to whether the marketing of service needs to be approached differently from the marketing of products is considered.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Gordon Greenley, Graham Hooley and John Saunders

There has been concern in the literature about the adequacy of the traditional model of marketing planning, which focuses on what decisions should be made and not on how…

Abstract

There has been concern in the literature about the adequacy of the traditional model of marketing planning, which focuses on what decisions should be made and not on how to make them. The aim of this article is a new conceptualisation that proposes key management processes about how marketing planning decisions are made in a dynamic context. The motives for this conceptualisation are to contribute to understanding by advancing the traditional model of marketing planning, to stimulate academic and practitioner debate about how marketing planning decisions are made, and to initiate new directions in marketing planning research. Two new competing models of marketing planning are developed, which address key management processes about how marketing planning decisions are made in a dynamic context, and research directions are proposed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Nick Lee and Gordon Greenley

The purpose of this editorial is to explicitly recognise the first issue of EJM completely made up of submissions received under the new editorial team of Lee and Greenley

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to explicitly recognise the first issue of EJM completely made up of submissions received under the new editorial team of Lee and Greenley, operating since January 2008. The authors also seek to make some broader points about academic review, and journal ranking.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide some conceptual thinking regarding journal review, and academic ranking of journals.

Findings

The authors propose that it is potentially dangerous to restrict the perception of top quality work to only that published in a limited selection of journals, and that research needs to be judged on its own merits.

Research limitations/implications

These thoughts are preliminary and intended to spark thinking and debate, not to represent editorial policy. Owing to space constraints, the coverage of many issues is necessarily brief.

Practical Implications

Marketing researchers should find these thoughts at the very least stimulating, and may wish to investigate these issues further.

Originality/value

The editorial should provide some interesting food for thought for marketing researchers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

Gordon E. Greenley

Investigates the understanding of marketing strategy and the differentiation and clarification of concepts used in conjunction with it. Carries out a search of the…

Abstract

Investigates the understanding of marketing strategy and the differentiation and clarification of concepts used in conjunction with it. Carries out a search of the literature revealing a wide variation in the understanding of marketing strategy. Develops a process for defining marketing strategy using three key levels: the overall strategic planning of the company; a framework developed from this from which marketing strategy should be developed; and the actual marketing strategy. Concludes that a firm needs to establish the strategic planning framework in defining its marketing strategy and its component parts. Suggests that failure to do so leads to ineffective definition, implementation and effectiveness of strategies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Graham Hooley, John Fahy, Gordon Greenley, József Beracs, Krzysztof Fonfara and Boris Snoj

The Narver and Slater market orientation scale is tested in the context of service firms in the transition economies of central Europe and found to be both valid and…

Abstract

The Narver and Slater market orientation scale is tested in the context of service firms in the transition economies of central Europe and found to be both valid and reliable. The survey examined levels of market orientation in 205 business to business services companies and 141 consumer services companies in Hungary, Poland and Slovenia. As predicted by the predominantly western marketing literature, those service firms with higher levels of market orientation; were more often found in turbulent, rapidly changing markets; were more likely to pursue longer term market building goals rather than short term efficiency objectives; more likely to pursue differentiated positioning through offering superior levels of service compared to competitors; and also performed better on both financial and market based criteria. A number of different business approaches, however, are evident in the transition economies suggesting that other business orientations may co‐exist with a market orientation creating a richer and more complex set of organizational drivers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Ian A. Combe and Gordon E. Greenley

Different forms of strategic flexibility allow for reactive adaptation to different changing environments and the proactive driving of change. It is therefore becoming…

Abstract

Different forms of strategic flexibility allow for reactive adaptation to different changing environments and the proactive driving of change. It is therefore becoming increasingly important for decision makers to not only possess marketing capabilities, but also the capabilities for strategic flexibility in its various forms. However, our knowledge of the relationships between decision makers' different ways of thinking and their capabilities for strategic flexibility is limited. This limitation is constraining research and understanding. In this article we develop a theoretical cognitive content framework that postulates relationships between different ways of thinking about strategy and different information‐processing demands. We then outline how the contrasting beliefs of decision makers may influence their capabilities to generate different hybrid forms of strategic flexibility at the cognitive level. Theoretically, the framework is embedded in resource‐based theory, personal construct theory and schema theory. The implications for research and theory are discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Ian N. Lings and Gordon E. Greenley

The purpose of this empirical paper is to investigate internal marketing from a behavioural perspective. The impact of internal marketing behaviours, operationalised as an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical paper is to investigate internal marketing from a behavioural perspective. The impact of internal marketing behaviours, operationalised as an internal market orientation (IMO), on employees' marketing and other in‐role behaviours (IRB) were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data measuring IMO, market orientation and a range of constructs relevant to the nomological network in which they are embedded were collected from the UK retail managers. These were tested to establish their psychometric properties and the conceptual model was analysed using structural equations modelling, employing a partial least squares methodology.

Findings

IMO has positive consequences for employees' market‐oriented and other IRB. These, in turn, influence marketing success.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides empirical support for the long‐held assumption that internal and external marketing are related and that organisations should balance their external focus with some attention to employees. Future research could measure the attitudes and behaviours of managers, employees and customers directly and explore the relationships between them.

Practical implications

Firm must ensure that they do not put the needs of their employees second to those of managers and shareholders; managers must develop their listening skills and organisations must become more responsive to the needs of their employees.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the scarce body of empirical support for the role of internal marketing in services organisations. For researchers, this paper legitimises the study of internal marketing as a route to external market success; for managers, the study provides quantifiable evidence that focusing on employees' wants and needs impacts their behaviours towards the market.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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