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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb024733. When citing the…

4236

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb024733. When citing the article, please cite: Gordon C. Bruner II, Richard J. Pomazal, (1988), “PROBLEM RECOGNITION: THE CRUCIAL FIRST STAGE OF THE CONSUMER DECISION PROCESS”, Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 2 Iss: 3, pp. 43 - 53.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Gordon C. Bruner and Richard J. Pomazal

Since 1910, when John Dewey first introduced the five‐stage decision process, it has been a widely accepted concept and still serves as the central pillar of a popular…

4862

Abstract

Since 1910, when John Dewey first introduced the five‐stage decision process, it has been a widely accepted concept and still serves as the central pillar of a popular consumer behavior model. These stages are Problem Recognition, Information Search, Alternative Evaluation, Choice, and Outcomes. The importance of these stages is attested to by the considerable attention devoted to most of them in numerous textbooks and journal articles. Such attention, however, has not come to the Problem Recognition stage. While some texts provide hypothetical descriptions of this “trigger” of the decision process, theoretical discussion and empirical support are surprisingly lacking. Journal literature fares even worse, with articles on the topic almost non‐existent. Lack of information on the topic is even more ironic when one considers that a purchase cannot occur unless a problem is recognized! The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed explanation of the Problem Recognition process. The results of the few empirical studies that have been done will be examined. In addition, a proposed model of the Problem Recognition process is presented. The implications of this material will be discussed as it relates to marketing.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Gordon C. Bruner and Richard J. Pomazal

Explains how little attention has traditionally been given to thestage of Problem Recognition, one of the five stages of the decisionprocess evaluated by John Dewey…

1974

Abstract

Explains how little attention has traditionally been given to the stage of Problem Recognition, one of the five stages of the decision process evaluated by John Dewey, finding this lack of information even more ironic when it is remembered that a purchase will not occur unless a problem has been identified. Provides a detailed explanation of the Problem Recognition process and examines the results of the few empirical studies which have been carried out. Proposes a model for the Problem Recognition process. Concludes with a discussion of the implications of the material for marketing and advocates further research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Gordon C. Bruner

The paper presents a simplified explanation of a rather complex mathematical approach to communication called information theory. This theory maintains that all…

Abstract

The paper presents a simplified explanation of a rather complex mathematical approach to communication called information theory. This theory maintains that all information can be quantified. The implications of this theory for advertising are discussed along with strategic and tactical suggestions. The conclusion is that knowledge of the information content of an advertisement helps to determine the optimum exposure level for an audience while maximizing promotional influence and minimizing advertising wearout.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

D.J. Wasmer and Gordon C. Bruner

Considers how recent concerns with service quality have led toincreased awareness of the importance of the role of the front‐lineemployee, the service provider. Describes…

1345

Abstract

Considers how recent concerns with service quality have led to increased awareness of the importance of the role of the front‐line employee, the service provider. Describes how internal marketing has been instrumental in raising service providers′ performance. Develops a method, drawing on organizational literature, for identifying segments of the service organization which can be targeted by internal marketing. Argues that the service marketer should view employees as “customers” who can be analysed using marketing techniques, thereby enabling the enhancement of service quality. Includes detailed recommendations and an appendix.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Songpol Kulviwat, Gordon C. Bruner II and James P. Neelankavil

This paper aims to examine whether self-efficacy plays an important role in shaping the effect of cognition and affects in high technology adoption. It also examines…

2278

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether self-efficacy plays an important role in shaping the effect of cognition and affects in high technology adoption. It also examines whether cognition and affect mediate the effect of self-efficacy on attitude toward adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental survey to collect data, subjects performed two different tasks (utilitarian and hedonic) to make sure that they had cognitive and affective experiences to draw upon as they developed attitudes toward the focal innovation. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the model.

Findings

The result shows that self-efficacy influenced cognitive perceptions and emotional reactions. Specifically, self-efficacy was found to play a substantive role in shaping individuals’ attitudes via a cognitive route (perceived usefulness and ease-of-use) and an affective one (pleasure, arousal and dominance).

Research limitations/implications

The study of self-efficacy as an external variable provides further insights into the process and is expected to increase the explained variance of the theoretical model.

Practical implications

This study confirms that a belief about something besides the product also plays a key role; it is the confidence consumers have in their own abilities to understand and effectively use a new piece of technology.

Originality/value

The research makes important contributions to our understanding of technology acceptance and has implications for marketing managers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Scott Thorne and Gordon C. Bruner

The purpose is to examine the behaviors of consumers engaged in fan activity and determine if there are attitudinal and behavioral characteristics common across the…

7805

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to examine the behaviors of consumers engaged in fan activity and determine if there are attitudinal and behavioral characteristics common across the differing fan subcultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The characteristics affecting fan behavior are examined through the literature and a series of structured interviews with fans which are then evaluated for the presence or lack of the sought for characteristics of fanaticism.

Findings

The research indicates that there are certain common characteristics to be found in fans interested in different topics and that these characteristics influence the behaviors of those involved in fan behavior.

Research limitations/implications

Given the prevalence of fan influences in popular and consumptive culture, opportunity exists for research beyond the exploratory work done here including larger interview populations from a greater number of fan subcultures.

Practical implications

Marketing professionals may use the identified characteristics as a guide in marketing popular culture to those markets best attuned to accept and embrace it.

Originality/value

This paper provides exploratory research in an area of popular culture that has previously been examined as categories of fans, rather than as an inclusive subculture of fanaticism.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

D. Randall Brandt and Kevin L. Reffett

Proposes that service quality can be improved by focusing on customer problems. Describes aproblem‐centred research program used to establish the types and pervasiveness…

1487

Abstract

Proposes that service quality can be improved by focusing on customer problems. Describes a problem‐centred research program used to establish the types and pervasiveness of customer problems and to evaluate the effect of each on customer satisfaction. Makes it possible to identifycritical problem areas and to establish service priorities accordingly. Offers recommended guidelines for designing and conducting problem‐centred consumer research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Marvin D. Troutt

This paper calls attention to the profound differences between personal inventory decision making and the corresponding decision making of business organizations. It is…

Abstract

This paper calls attention to the profound differences between personal inventory decision making and the corresponding decision making of business organizations. It is argued first that the motivations and criteria being used by consumers are vastly different from the assumptions of models such as the well known EOQ (Economic Order Quantity) model. Next the implications for marketing are discussed. A research agenda is then proposed for filling in some of what is currently unknown.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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