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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Ashu Tiwari

The US-China trade war has brought forth the problem of balance of trade not only for them, but also for many other economies in the world. However, all the commodity…

Abstract

The US-China trade war has brought forth the problem of balance of trade not only for them, but also for many other economies in the world. However, all the commodity segments are not equally affected and thus, the segment-wise trade analysis of commodities can bring up many valuable insights, vital for policy formulation process. Despite this, existing literature barely covered this aspect as a focal research. Therefore, this chapter has carried out segment-wise analysis of commodity classes popular in international trade discussions for the United States and China since the trade dispute intensified between them. In this chapter, we have built an argument around three commodity-segments which are popular in international trade studies namely, the raw material segment, semi-finished goods segment, and finished goods segments. While doing this analysis, we majorly focused on monopolistic power of economies in different commodity segments. We found that while in the segment of raw material, mostly cost is driving the trade, in the finished goods segment, variety and innovations are the key drivers that can boost trade by discovering new consumption spaces.

Details

Productivity Growth in the Manufacturing Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-094-8

Keywords

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing.

Study level/applicability

This case may be used by instructors to teach undergraduate, post graduate and executive level programmes in management. It may be used in basic marketing, branding or marketing strategy courses. The case may serve as a platform for the instructor to discuss the concepts and issues related to positioning and repositioning.

Case overview

Tata Chemicals, a subsidiary of the Tata group, launched the “i-Shakti” brand six years ago for its low-cost “solar-evaporated” salt for rural customers. In 2010, the company extended the brand equity of i-Shakti to a premium segment and launched a new brand “Tata i-Shakti” with a range of unpolished pulses. Changing the brand name and customer base from “i-Shakti for rural market” to “Tata i-Shakti for premium market” created a dilemma among customers in the market. To overcome this problem, in October 2015, the company’s portfolio of pulses, gram flour and food grade soda under “Tata i-Shakti” label has migrated into a new brand “Tata Sampann”. The company also launched a range of spices under the brand name of “Tata Sampann”. This new brand “Tata Sampann” was launched to serve the premium segment with an aim to “enrich everyday meals with extra nutrition and extra joy”. Also, this brand recreation was made by the company with anticipation to make avenues for future launches in the staples and food segment under Tata’s consumer products business. It has been almost a year since Tata Sampann was launched in the market. Given the tough competition and expected growth of the spices market in India, it remained to be seen whether “Tata i-Shakti” was rightly rebranded or repositioned with “Tata Sampann”.

Expected learning outcomes

To make participants understand the basic concepts of branding such as umbrella branding, brand repositioning and rebranding. To make participants learn about various brand elements and how they contribute in communicating the value proposition of the brand. To make participants appreciate various marketing and brand related strategies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Chitra Singla, Akshay Yadav, Advait Gomkale and Aditya Shekhar Acharya

Rajan Overseas was founded by Rajan Makhija in the year 2014. It was into export of handloom products like rugs, throws, etc. Makhija wanted the company to grow from INR…

Abstract

Rajan Overseas was founded by Rajan Makhija in the year 2014. It was into export of handloom products like rugs, throws, etc. Makhija wanted the company to grow from INR 7.6 crores to 100 crores in the next five years. However, the plan hit a roadblock as one of the largest customer of Makhija wanted him to sign an exclusive contract. Makhija was evaluating various growth options in the light of this new hurdle. The case can be taught in courses on entrepreneurship, internationalization and strategy for SMEs to teach topics related to effectuation and challenges of international business.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Anne-Marie Lebrun, Quentin Neveu and Patrick Bouchet

The objective of this research is to understand and compare the perceived brand positioning of two football megabrands (Adidas and Nike) for a specific social group, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this research is to understand and compare the perceived brand positioning of two football megabrands (Adidas and Nike) for a specific social group, the registered amateur football players in France, using the social representation theory (SRT) as the theoretical framework and the free word associations as the main method.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted through face-to-face questionnaire among a convenience sample of registered amateur football players in France (n = 362) and for which 52 percent chose Adidas and 48 percent Nike.

Findings

Findings demonstrated that Adidas and Nike have a different perceived brand positioning for the registered amateur football players in France. Adidas is perceived as more typical and positioned “inside the football ground” through main characteristics of its football goods for training and competition. Nike is more positioned “outside the football ground” through their sportswear goods for daily life and fashion.

Originality/value

The interest of this research is to be primarily inductive and focus on a specific group (membership of registered amateur football players) to understand the perceived brand positioning in the football market. The method allows activating the belonging with this group (higher level of practice with these brands) by using the SRT method of free word associations. Thanks to this original approach, results could help managers of Nike and Adidas reinforce their brand positioning and gain market share, as well as build their specific brand community like both megabrands did for the runners in France.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Abstract

Details

Productivity Growth in the Manufacturing Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-094-8

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mitchell A. Petersen

Teuer Furniture is a privately owned, moderately sized chain of upscale home furnishing showrooms in the United States. By the end of 2012, it had regained its financial…

Abstract

Teuer Furniture is a privately owned, moderately sized chain of upscale home furnishing showrooms in the United States. By the end of 2012, it had regained its financial footing and a number of long-term investors, including several of Teuer’s original non-management investors, now want to sell their shares. At the request of the board, Jennifer Jerabek, the chief financial officer of the company, and her team put together an extensive valuation of Teuer based on a discounted cash flow analysis. When the model was presented to investors, a number of them disagreed with the results. Some investors considered the value too high; others considered it too low. Not surprisingly, some of the differences of opinion were correlated with whether or not the investors wanted to sell their shares of Teuer. Jerabek was instructed to build a valuation of Teuer using a multiples approach instead.

After reading and analyzing the case, students will be able to:

  • Estimate the value of a firm using a multiples approach

  • Select an appropriate group of comparable firms and defend the logic behind the selection

  • Select a correct set of valuation ratios and defend the logic behind the selection

  • Compare the valuations produced by a multiples and DCF approach and if the valuations do not match, explain why the two methods yield different valuations

Estimate the value of a firm using a multiples approach

Select an appropriate group of comparable firms and defend the logic behind the selection

Select a correct set of valuation ratios and defend the logic behind the selection

Compare the valuations produced by a multiples and DCF approach and if the valuations do not match, explain why the two methods yield different valuations

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Ling Gao, Marjorie J.T. Norton, Zhi‐ming Zhang and Chester Kin‐man To

The purpose of this paper is to investigate market segmentation of affluent Chinese consumers and develop profiles of identified segments for potential target markets for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate market segmentation of affluent Chinese consumers and develop profiles of identified segments for potential target markets for luxury fashion goods.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are from the 2006 edition of an annual survey called the “China's New Rich Study”. The respondents form a representative sample of affluent consumers, 18 to 45 years old, residing in China's 12 largest cities. A psychographic segmentation approach is employed to classify these consumers.

Findings

Five distinct market segments of affluent Chinese consumers are identified and profiled. Of these segments, three seem the most promising target markets for luxury fashion goods.

Practical implications

When companies understand the similarities and differences between consumer segments as well as the unique characteristics of segments, they have a meaningful basis for selecting receptive target markets and formulating and implementing effective marketing strategies. The findings of this study can be useful not only to companies that offer luxury fashion goods, but also to those targeting the upscale market with a plethora of products and services like yachts, luxury cars, high‐end electronics, resort vacations, and credit cards and other financial services.

Originality/value

This is the first study on segmentation of Chinese consumers for potential target markets for luxury fashion goods. Results reveal heterogeneity among affluent urban Chinese consumers. Strategies for marketing luxury fashion goods to promising target markets in China are outlined on the basis of segment profiles and culturally based motivations for purchasing such goods.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Jihyun Kim

This research provides a comprehensive overview of the luxury brand cognitive and affective experience, category ownerships and consumption level of affluent adult…

1049

Abstract

Purpose

This research provides a comprehensive overview of the luxury brand cognitive and affective experience, category ownerships and consumption level of affluent adult consumers in the USA. The purpose of this study was to illuminate generational cohorts’ differences and/or similarities among the consumers regarding collecting behavior of, brand self-congruity toward and emotional brand attachment with fashion luxury brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional quantitative approach, the authors conducted a national, representative online survey, 443 usable responses were collected from four generational cohorts, namely, older boomers, younger boomers, Generation Xers and Millennials, who reported an annual household income of US$150,000 or more. Descriptive and multivariate statistical analyses were used to provide the empirical findings.

Findings

Findings suggest that there are significant differences in the luxury brands they owned the most; Millennials exhibited significantly more frequent purchases of luxury fashion goods for all retail types – both brick-and-mortar and online, as well as upscale and discount-image retailers, compared to older Baby Boomers; and there are clear distinctions of cognitive, affective and behavioral responses toward fashion luxury goods between Millennials and older Baby Boomers. For instance, Millennials are more emotionally attached to luxury fashion brands, they see themselves more aligned with the brand image, and they collect such goods significantly more, compared to the older Baby Boomers.

Originality/value

By providing empirical evidence of contrasting each generational group’s unique consumption behavior in terms of luxury brand goods such as ownership level (accessible vs high-end luxury), retail channel choice behavior, cognitive, affective and behavioral responses toward the luxury fashion goods, the authors provided clear strategies for the luxury brand managers regarding two distinctive segments in the luxury marketplace.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Gustavo Barboza

This paper’s main objective is to expand the demand-driven strategic field by developing a model where endogenization of consumers’ preferences for clean(er) products…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper’s main objective is to expand the demand-driven strategic field by developing a model where endogenization of consumers’ preferences for clean(er) products becomes the driver of the firm green corporate social responsible (GCSR) profit maximization behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The model proposes that in undifferentiated markets, firms using a conventional technology manage production-related negative externalities via information asymmetries. In turn, when consumer socially responsible individuals (CnSR) discover the nature of the information asymmetries, they then reveal their preferences. The building block of the model is that CnSR derive value both from intrinsic as well as extrinsic product features, and derive negative satisfaction from the production negative externalities. In turn, CnSR preferences offer a higher willingness to pay for a combined intrinsic (private good and direct utility) and extrinsic (public good and feel good–do good utility) product.

Findings

The model demonstrates that the firm’s GCSR behavior is a technological-driven process directly affecting the extrinsic component of the product through the development of a safe technology, and exclusively targeting CnSR type of consumers. The corollary of the model is that for the firm pursuing a GCSR behavior, the development of a competitive advantage with higher firm performance leads to profit maximization when exclusively serving the GCSR segment of the market. Thus, GCSR is the result of unusual innovation efforts.

Originality/value

This paper presents a model that expands the field of strategic management through the demand-driven incorporation and respective modeling. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first model to explicitly develop this relationship in this format.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Hans H. Stamer and Hermann Diller

This paper sets out to explore the degree to which consumer price segments can be generalized across product categories.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore the degree to which consumer price segments can be generalized across product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive segmentation framework of price‐related activating and cognitive inner processes and preferences is proposed to account for heterogeneity in consumer response to price. Large‐scale consumer survey data on price‐related attitudes in eight consumer goods categories (paper tissue, soap bar, chocolate bar, detergent, facial moisturizer, television set, washing machine, jeans) are used for cluster analysis.

Findings

On the aggregate level, five stable price segments across consumer goods categories are identified and described. On the individual level, it is found that price behavioural consistency is a function of the category context in terms of price uncertainty and quality uncertainty.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that price management should be concerned with price segment structures and their specific price needs. Price segmentation could particularly benefit retailers in order to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of consumer targeting.

Originality/value

The contribution of the study is to show that identical price segments can be identified across categories, whereas the individual segment membership depends on the nature and level of perceived risk in the category.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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