Search results

1 – 10 of over 175000
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Sarah Aust

This article explores the use of the Good Lives Model and its relevance to people with a learning disability and forensic needs. The article presents the rationale for…

981

Abstract

This article explores the use of the Good Lives Model and its relevance to people with a learning disability and forensic needs. The article presents the rationale for using the model; arguing that it has the potential to address the complexities of meeting both the person‐centred agenda in learning disabilities services and the public protection agenda in relation to the management of mentally disordered offenders, including those detained under the Mental Health Act (2007). The model is compared with other treatment models, such as the Risk‐Need‐Responsivity Model (RNR). The paper briefly explores how the model may be practically applied in a service for people with learning disabilities who have committed, or who are at risk of committing, sexual offences.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Mary Barnao

The Good Lives Model (GLM) is a new approach to offender rehabilitation that provides an integrative framework for assisting individuals to achieve their goals while…

Abstract

Purpose

The Good Lives Model (GLM) is a new approach to offender rehabilitation that provides an integrative framework for assisting individuals to achieve their goals while reducing their risk for reoffending. Recently it has been proposed that an augmented form of the GLM could provide a comprehensive conceptual, ethical and practice framework for rehabilitation within the specialty of forensic mental health. However, there is a paucity of published literature to guide practitioners on how to integrate the GLM into their practice with mentally disordered offenders. The aim of this article is to present a set of resources (the GLM tool kit) tailored for use with offenders with mental disorder.

Design/methodology/approach

Each of the five resources that comprise the tool kit will be described, the theoretical, methodological and practical considerations that influenced their development will be reviewed, and a case example demonstrating their clinical application, presented.

Findings

The tool kit can guide forensic mental health practitioners in assessment, case conceptualization and rehabilitation planning according to the Good Lives Model. It includes some practical resources that practitioners can use to help mentally disordered offenders understand themselves better, including the reasons why they came to offend, and to highlight what they need to change to live better lives.

Practical implications

The paper provides clinicians with some structure in applying the Good Lives Model within a forensic mental health team context.

Originality/value

Much of the GLM practice literature relates to non‐mentally disordered offenders. The paper builds on this literature by presenting a set of tools that have been designed specifically with mentally disordered offenders in mind.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Theresa A. Gannon, Tracy King, Helen Miles, Lona Lockerbie and Gwenda M. Willis

The main aim of this paper is to describe the content, structure and preliminary evaluation of a new Good Lives sexual offender treatment group (SOTG) for male mentally…

1535

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this paper is to describe the content, structure and preliminary evaluation of a new Good Lives sexual offender treatment group (SOTG) for male mentally disordered offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

As evaluation and work on the SOTG is necessarily ongoing, case study descriptions of each patient who attended the SOTG and of their progress throughout SOTG are described.

Findings

Overall, the case study progress reports suggest that mentally disordered male patients made some notable progress on SOTG despite their differential and complex needs. In particular, attention to each patient's life goals and motivators appeared to play a key role in promoting treatment engagement. Furthermore, patients with lower intelligence quotient and/or indirect pathways required additional support to understand the links between the Good Lives Model (GLM) and their own risk for sexual offending.

Research limitations/implications

Further evaluations of SOTG groups, that incorporate higher numbers of participants and adequate control groups, are required before solid conclusions and generalisations can be made.

Practical implications

Practitioners should consider providing additional support to clients when implementing any future SOTGs for mentally disordered patients.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to outline and describe implementation of the GLM in the sexual offender treatment of mentally disordered male patients group format. As such, it will be of interest to any professionals involved in the facilitation of sexual offender treatment within this population.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Clare-Ann Fortune, Tony Ward and Devon L.L. Polaschek

There is increasing interest in applying strength-based approaches to offender rehabilitation. The purpose of this paper is to use the Good Lives Model (GLM) as an example…

1253

Abstract

Purpose

There is increasing interest in applying strength-based approaches to offender rehabilitation. The purpose of this paper is to use the Good Lives Model (GLM) as an example to illustrate the fit that exists between strength-based approaches to offender rehabilitation and therapeutic communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors briefly describe the GLM before discussing the key themes that link the two perspectives; the authors argue they naturally fit together in a number of areas.

Findings

Both perspectives emphasise the importance of creating a safe and trusting therapeutic environment in which capacities (e.g. skills) can be developed that assist individuals to go on to live lives which are personally meaningful, and in which all their needs are met, enabling them to live offence free. Both also place importance on the role of personal responsibility.

Originality/value

The authors conclude the GLM could usefully contribute to improving outcomes for those transitioning into the community after leaving a Therapeutic Community, through developing clear life goals that are personally meaningful, and identifying practical steps for achieving these goals.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Jenna Zeccola, Sally Fiona Kelty and Douglas Boer

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy of good lives model (GLM) interventions on the recidivism outcomes of convicted offenders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy of good lives model (GLM) interventions on the recidivism outcomes of convicted offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

The review adhered to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis and Cochrane guidelines. Digital databases were searched and articles reporting outcomes of the GLM amongst convicted offenders and outcomes including recidivism data and pre-post measures of dynamic risk were included in a narrative synthesis.

Findings

Of 1,791 articles screened, only six studies met the criteria for review. Key findings were: in half the reviewed studies, GLM did not increase recidivism risk; in half the reviewed studies, only when the correct treatment dosage was applied that some evidence of risk reduction was found; there was limited support for GLM increasing or sustaining motivation for resistance from reoffending. Research for the review was limited and support for the GLM in reducing recidivism rates was not established.

Practical implications

In this 2021 review, the authors examined the efficacy of the GLM in reducing recidivism. This addresses a gap in the literature. The authors found that there is insufficient evidence to suggest that the GLM can reduce recidivism. This has implications for practitioners who wish to deliver evidence-based practices in prison/community settings. There is currently not enough peer-reviewed evidence to unequivocally confirm the efficacy of the GLM. The authors recommended additional quality programme outcome research be carried out.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to assess quantitative and qualitative studies on the efficacy of the GLM and provides foundations for future research.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Max Ward and Pamela Attwell

The purpose of this paper is to gauge service user’ perspectives on the effectiveness of two community outreach forensic psychological services in London for people with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gauge service user’ perspectives on the effectiveness of two community outreach forensic psychological services in London for people with personality disorder and serious mental illness who pose a risk of sexual and violent offending. Both services are guided by principles of the Good Lives Model and circles of support and accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was mixed qualitative and quantitative, incorporating thematic evaluation of semi-structured interviews with service users and a rating-scale constructed specifically for this purpose.

Findings

Outcomes suggest both services are broadly successful in achieving their aims to: first, enhance psychological well-being and general quality of life; second, promote links with other agencies and broader social inclusion; and third, monitor and manage risk of re-offending.

Research limitations/implications

However, there are limitations. Cause and effect cannot be inferred and outcomes are not generalizable to other contexts partly as a result of the small sample size. Another possible issue is that participants spoke favorably about their care through fear of being evaluated negatively or through fear of compromising the support they receive. To control for these and other possible confounding variables, further more rigorous research is required.

Practical implications

The current findings can be used as a guide to help services engage and manage people with personality disorder and serious mental illness who are at risk of further serious offending.

Originality/value

It is suggested here that the current findings contribute to the body of evidence supporting initiatives that aim to address recidivism by enabling offenders to develop a more positive identity through social and community inclusion and integration.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Heather Straughan and Michael Buckenham

This paper reports outcomes from a holistic, recovery‐based, user‐led group training for people with DSM‐IV bipolar disorder. Drawn from professional therapies and…

Abstract

This paper reports outcomes from a holistic, recovery‐based, user‐led group training for people with DSM‐IV bipolar disorder. Drawn from professional therapies and personal experience of the illness by the user‐researcher, the training was delivered over 12 weekly sessions. Using a case‐study approach, an experimental design incorporated pilot (eight participants), main study (five) and control groups (six). Self‐report scales measured mood, coping, empowerment and quality of life pre‐, post‐ and six months post‐training. Semi‐structured interviews noted individual change within the same time frame. Interviews with mental health professionals, medical note analysis and user‐researcher observations also informed the study. Findings from self‐report questionnaires indicated that participants experienced improved mood stability, symptom severity, coping and quality of life and greater empowerment. Out of the six controls, two indicated slight but slow recovery, four continued to use poor coping skills, and two of these four experienced major relapses.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2010

Michael Petrunik and Adina Ilea

Purpose – This chapter explores claims of social problem workers in criminal justice and mental health with regard to how to manage males who are identified as or…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores claims of social problem workers in criminal justice and mental health with regard to how to manage males who are identified as or self-identify as both victims and perpetrators (V/Ps) of sexual abuse. We also examine the claims of V/Ps with regard to how they manage their dual status.

Methodology – This chapter is based on an action research project on intervention services for V/Ps in Ontario, Canada. Our data include literature reviews, interviews with intervention professionals, V/P narratives, and a transcription of a stake-holder's workshop.

Findings – Intervention workers whose mandate is offender risk management state they give little attention to victimization-related issues of V/Ps, whereas workers in victims’ services often state that adult V/Ps are not covered under their mandate. This suggests that the status of offender is the master status for adult V/Ps. Our V/P narratives recount efforts at self-management and some V/Ps and intervention professionals have expressed interest in the possibility of developing programs specially designed for V/Ps.

Practical Implications – An examination of issues related to the dual status of sexual abuse V/Ps suggests that V/Ps may require special services that cannot be provided by existing programs for perpetrators and victims.

Originality/Value of Paper – Studies of social problem work might benefit from considering not only professionals’ viewpoints but also those of their clients. This chapter explores new intervention models (GLM and RJ) that incorporate ethical concerns based on a rights perspective (“moral repair”) and the experiential concerns of V/Ps.

Details

New Approaches to Social Problems Treatment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-737-0

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Gary Manders

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of moral conversations (MCs) within the context of youth justice as a potential resource for the process of change towards…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of moral conversations (MCs) within the context of youth justice as a potential resource for the process of change towards desisting from crime among a group of young offenders. It is centred on engagement with the perceptions and values of youth offenders in seeking to engage and work effectively with them, to consider in what ways the art of MCs and using askesis or practice to develop oneself can enable or constrain young people in their endeavours.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 young offenders to ascertain their beliefs and values in relation to their attitude to offending.

Findings

The research found that an examination of an individual’s worldview through a MC enables practitioners to identify the potential and motivation for change. It can identify both the enablers and barriers to change, and elicit a young person’s real attitudes to offending. Crucially, the research found that through this process individuals can begin to think more about the possibility of transformation and the steps needed to modify their offending behaviour, in order to move away from crime and to begin to implement an alternative future.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a small sample of 40 young offenders. However, the findings suggest that further research should be conducted in this area.

Social implications

The research raises questions about how the issue of beliefs and values in relation to young offenders is navigated within the youth justice system.

Originality/value

The research examines an area of research that is often neglected and which has previously received little attention. The findings are of interest for academics and practitioners concerned with recidivism and the factors that contribute to changes in behaviour for young offenders.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Hannah Merdian, Danielle Kettleborough, Kieran McCartan and Derek E. Perkins

Increasing numbers of convictions for the use of child sexual exploitation material (CSEM) call for enhanced measures to prevent this type of offending. Strength-based…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing numbers of convictions for the use of child sexual exploitation material (CSEM) call for enhanced measures to prevent this type of offending. Strength-based approaches such as the good lives model have made significant contributions to the management of offenders who have sexually abused against children. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study explored the application of these models to the rehabilitation and desistance behaviour of CSEM users, based on a thematic analysis of the self-managed desistance strategies employed by 26 offenders.

Findings

The findings confirmed the value of strength-based approaches in understanding self-management strategies used to enhance desistance behaviour in CSEM users.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical and theoretical findings were then combined into a conceptual framework aimed to enhance preventative efforts and interventions targeted at undetected CSEM users.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first conceptual and empirical model of prevention and desistance behaviour specific to CSEM offending.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 175000