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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Leonardi Louis, Ruth Fairchild and Anita Setarehnejad

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of alternative ingredients in three different gluten-free breads (GFBs) available in the UK market with regard to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of alternative ingredients in three different gluten-free breads (GFBs) available in the UK market with regard to their quality attributes and consumer preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different GFB samples purchased from a UK retailer were visually assessed. Their quality attributes and consumer acceptability were analysed via an untrained taste panel (n=35) on Day 1. Texture was compared using a texture analyser on Days 1 and 8, to examine the differences between samples and the effects of ingredients towards staling.

Findings

Results from visual inspection showed that ingredients affected the appearance of samples, in terms of crumb structure, and both crumb and crust colour. Firmness and springiness were significantly different (p<0.05, p=0.007) between samples on Days 1 and 8 although no significant difference existed within each individual sample. Sensory analysis showed no significant differences between samples with respect to denseness, chewiness, crumbliness, dryness and overall preference.

Research limitations/implications

The ingredient combination in each bread differed, and thus it is not clear if the results are due to the incorporation of individual ingredient or a combination of them.

Practical implications

Results of this study will help food industry to make an easier decision on gluten-free ingredients.

Social implications

It will help people with coeliac disease and those who wish to remove gluten from their diets.

Originality/value

Overall, the study showed that the use of different ingredients affected the appearance, firmness and springiness of three GFBs available in the UK market. However, it did not affect denseness, chewiness, crumbliness, dryness or consumer preference. This indicates that a number of ingredient combinations are possible in the manufacturing of acceptable GFB.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Estefania Julia Dierings de Souza, Aline Machado Pereira, Mauro Fontana, Nathan Levien Vanier and Marcia Arocha Gularte

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of rice flour obtained from rice grains with different levels of amylose on technological, nutritional and sensory…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of rice flour obtained from rice grains with different levels of amylose on technological, nutritional and sensory properties of cookies made with a blend of rice and cowpea flour.

Design/methodology/approach

The cookies preparation was set at a ratio of rice flour and cowpea beans 70:30. The studied formulations were: LA: low amylose rice flour; MA: medium-amylose rice flour; HA: high amylose rice flour. The quality of the obtained cookies was analyzed for proximate composition, in vitro protein digestibility, thickness, diameter, dispersion factor, texture, color, amino acid profile and sensory properties.

Findings

Proximate composition and in vitro protein digestibility showed no differences between the three studied formulations. The medium and low amylose rice flour cookies showed the lowest hardness values. The combination of rice and beans allowed a good balance of essential amino acids. The cookies formulated with high amylose rice flour presented lighter coloration, low hardness and greater sensory preference.

Originality/value

Rice and cowpea flours are an alternative source for the preparation of gluten-free bakery products, such as cookies. The high amylose content of rice flour has less negative interference in the texture characteristics of the cookies. The combination of rice and beans flour provides a balance of essential amino acids.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2012

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Rita Greer

Rita Greer describes her very successful, one woman research to produce attractive and appetising food for a gluten free diet. As an artist, her approach to the problem…

Abstract

Rita Greer describes her very successful, one woman research to produce attractive and appetising food for a gluten free diet. As an artist, her approach to the problem was unique. If an engraver can produce forgeries of bank notes, why, she asked herself, should not an artistic cook be able to produce forgeries of ordinary food to meet the needs of a special diet?

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 78 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Amanda Bagolin do Nascimento, Giovanna Medeiros Rataichesck Fiates, Adilson dos Anjos and Evanilda Teixeira

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet…

Abstract

Purpose

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet quality are scarce. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the availability, price, and nutritional composition of gluten-free products in retail stores of a Brazilian capital city.

Design/methodology/approach

All retail stores listed by the Brazilian Coeliac Association as gluten-free product selling places in the city of Florianópolis were visited. All available products were catalogued and their labels analysed for nutritional content. Similar gluten-containing products were systematically selected in order to allow comparisons. t-test, analyses of covariance, and cluster analysis were performed, all considering a 5 per cent significance level.

Findings

Availability and variety of gluten-free products was limited and prices were high. Cluster analysis found similarities in the nutritional content of gluten-free and conventional food products, suggesting that although raw materials different than wheat were being employed, the composition patterns are the same. Certain advantages in the composition of gluten-free products were observed, regarding mainly calories and sodium, however, protein and dietary fibre values were inferior.

Social implications

Results observed may negatively impact diet adherence and stimulate the intake of conventional products with harmful consequences to the quality of life and health of coeliac individuals.

Originality/value

This paper conducted a careful evaluation of nutrition composition of gluten-free products from different categories, available in retail stores, which is rare in researches on this topic. Moreover, results call attention to the need of better care in product formulation and dietary guidance for coeliac individuals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Sarah Hopkins and Jan Mei Soon

Coeliac disease (CD) is a life-long condition requiring strict adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet. Due to wide claims of availability and lower costs of gluten-free food…

Abstract

Purpose

Coeliac disease (CD) is a life-long condition requiring strict adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet. Due to wide claims of availability and lower costs of gluten-free food (GFF) and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England needing to save costs, access to prescriptions for patients with CD is being limited in England. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the availability and cost of GFF in an area where patients with CD have restricted access to prescriptions and to assess the nutritional composition of GFFs available in comparison with foods containing gluten (FCG).

Design/methodology/approach

Eight food categories that were representative of a range of commonly purchased GFFs were selected. Availability and cost of the cheapest and most expensive branded and non-branded GFFs and gluten containing equivalents were surveyed at physical stores (n=19) and online stores (n=8). The nutritional composition of some of the widely available GFFs identified (n=190) and comparable FCGs (n=218) were calculated using MyFitnessPal.

Findings

None of the budget stores or corner shops surveyed stocked any of the surveyed cereal-based GFFs. Online stores had more availability than physical stores; however, there was no significant difference in cost. GFFs cost, on average, 2.18 times more than FCG. When making nutritional comparisons with gluten-containing food, protein content was lower across 55 per cent of GFF categories. There was significantly less sugar in GF brown bread, crackers, and wholegrain pasta compared with those containing gluten (CG). Another main finding was GF ready-meals contained significantly less salt than ready-meals CG.

Originality/value

Limited resources and perceived wide availability of GF products resulted in reduced GF prescriptions to patients in England. The findings in this study revealed that there is no availability of cereal-based GFFs in budget stores, high cost and limited access to prescriptions can influence adherence to a GF diet and is most likely to affect patients from deprived groups. This study recommends that the prescription of GFF to patients with CD should be continued.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Katira da Mota Huerta, Caroline Pagnossim Boeira, Marcela Bromberger Soquetta, Jamila dos Santos Alves, Ernesto Hashime Kubota and Claudia Severo da Rosa

The preparation of gluten-free bread is a challenge because the gluten in wheat is the main ingredient responsible for the retention of the gases which cause the bread to…

Abstract

Purpose

The preparation of gluten-free bread is a challenge because the gluten in wheat is the main ingredient responsible for the retention of the gases which cause the bread to rise. This paper aims to develop breads without gluten and fat, and to evaluate the effect of the use of chia (Salvia hispanic L.) flour on the physical, nutritional and sensory properties of the breads that were developed.

Design/methodology/approach

Three formulations were developed with different proportions of chia flour (2.5, 5 and 7.5%), fat-free. Physiochemical, sensorial analyses were performed out in three repetitions (p-value = 0.05).

Findings

In the nutritional assessment, the results demonstrated that 7.5% chia showed higher levels of protein (15.1%), lipid (3.43%), total fiber (7.04%) and lower levels of carbohydrates (22.49%), with significant nutrient enrichment (p-value = 0.05). The specific volume and the elevation of the dough decreased with the addition of chia flour. In the sensorial analysis, the treatments with chia flour showed no significant difference regarding flavor and texture when compared to the standard. The addition of chia improved the nutritional and sensory properties (p-value = 0.05).

Originality/value

The chia flour improved the nutritional characteristics of the breads, in the reduction of carbohydrate content and the increase in the content of protein, minerals and fiber. It presented good acceptability and good nutritional characteristics, providing a healthy and differentiated variation in this segment.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Edward D. Hess

This case could be used in entrepreneurship, strategy, and small-business courses. It presents classic issues regarding successful start-ups such as how to choose from a…

Abstract

This case could be used in entrepreneurship, strategy, and small-business courses. It presents classic issues regarding successful start-ups such as how to choose from a multitude of growth opportunities; how to pace growth so as not to dilute quality control and financial risk tolerance; and how to choose a strategic focus.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Richard Emmett

This paper highlights the effectiveness of TCS (the Teaching Company Scheme) in improving the performance and competitiveness of companies in the food‐processing industry…

Abstract

This paper highlights the effectiveness of TCS (the Teaching Company Scheme) in improving the performance and competitiveness of companies in the food‐processing industry. The industry is swinging towards the more efficient production of safe, high‐quality foods, a change propelled by UK and EC legislation and by market forces. Developing and implementing new process procedures and systems, exploring and developing novel ingredients, new products and market sectors are projects that require heavy investment of time, resources and personnel. However, many small and medium‐sized food‐processing companies lack the resources necessary to carry out such strategic projects. TCS is a highly successful government scheme that stimulates innovation and facilitates technology and knowledge transfer in most business and industry sectors, including the food industry, by supporting partnerships between companies and the UK’s knowledge base (universities and research organisations and institutions). It also enables companies to recruit and train high‐calibre graduates seeking careers in industry.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 2016

Paul Coughlan, David Coghlan, Denise O’Leary, Clare Rigg and Doireann Barrett

The chapter describes and reflects upon an EU-funded research initiative, TRADEIT, which has attempted to develop a learning network among European traditional food…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter describes and reflects upon an EU-funded research initiative, TRADEIT, which has attempted to develop a learning network among European traditional food producers as one way of contributing to the economic sustainability of the ventures, the social sustainability of the food’s regional character and the environmental sustainability of food production through the use of traditional methods.

Methodology/approach

The chapter describes TRADEIT before moving on to an exploration of learning in organizations and networks. It outlines the action learning research methodology developed and implemented to explore the development of a learning network in TRADEIT. A single case history is presented to illustrate the engagement of a small food producer in the network.

Findings

The discussion reflects on the application of action learning in supporting sustainability evident in TRADEIT.

Originality/value

The chapter focuses on the application of action learning in the development of a learning network among traditional food producers across Europe.

Details

Organizing Supply Chain Processes for Sustainable Innovation in the Agri-Food Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-488-4

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