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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kasra Ferdows

The purpose of this paper is to argue that operations management (OM) scholars ought to be among the thought leaders in research into the design and management of global

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that operations management (OM) scholars ought to be among the thought leaders in research into the design and management of global production networks, but too few of them currently are. It suggests possible reasons for what is holding them back and calls for ideas for removing the obstacles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a viewpoint. Nevertheless, it reports results of an indicative survey and uses example cases to illustrate and support its arguments.

Findings

The survey confirms the conclusions from previous studies that the number of publications specifically in leading OM journals focusing on management of global operations is small. Relatively high levels of detail and dynamic complexity and hysteresis of variables affecting the management of global operations are identified as the major hurdles. Applying analytical modeling, a popular research methodology among OM scholars, may be of limited use as it mandates making too many simplifying assumptions. Empirical research is also difficult because it is time consuming and requires access to often sensitive data and may require longitudinal studies. These are tough problems with no clear solutions.

Originality/value

The paper urges OM scholars to take on the broad and strategic problems in management of global operations. That would not only change how the OM discipline is viewed, but it would also benefit the firm, the economy, and the society.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sebastian Pashaei and Jan Olhager

The purpose of this paper is to explore how global operations of manufacturing companies influence the choice of product architecture decisions, ranging from integral to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how global operations of manufacturing companies influence the choice of product architecture decisions, ranging from integral to modular product designs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform a multiple-case study of three global manufacturing companies with integral and modular product architectures.

Findings

The authors find that the internal network capabilities, the number of capable plants, the focus of component plants, the focus of assembly plants, the distances from key suppliers to internal plants, and the number of market segments significantly influence the choice of integral vs modular architecture.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to three large manufacturing companies with global operations. However, the authors investigate both integral and modular products. The authors develop propositions that can be tested in further survey research.

Practical implications

The findings show that the type of global operations network influences the decision on product architecture, such that certain global operations characteristics support integral product designs, while other characteristics support modular designs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge this paper is the first study on the explicit impact of global operations on product architecture, rather than the other way around.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Stanley E. Fawcett, Laura Birou and Barbara Cofield Taylor

The development of co‐ordinated global manufacturing is animportant approach to enhancing competitiveness. However, globalmanufacturing strategies provide the greatest…

Abstract

The development of co‐ordinated global manufacturing is an important approach to enhancing competitiveness. However, global manufacturing strategies provide the greatest competitive advantage when they are appropriately supported through key value‐added logistics and purchasing activities. Examines the relationship between global manufacturing and strategic advantage, emphasizing the need to establish adequate logistics and purchasing support. Presents a conceptual overview of the topic and reports the results of a survey‐based empirical study. Objectives are to examine the state of current logistics and purchasing practice as they relate to supporting the global network, and to evaluate the performance of these key activities as they support global operations.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Jack Meredith and Aleda Roth

Relates the current situation with regard to operations management in the USA by reporting on journal submissions and course popularity. Notes that the areas most popular…

Abstract

Relates the current situation with regard to operations management in the USA by reporting on journal submissions and course popularity. Notes that the areas most popular in terms of journal submissions are supply chain management, operations strategy and quality management. Also notes that, in terms of course popularity, areas such as consulting, entrepreneurship, international business and project management are of great interest to students.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Mark Pagell, Jeffrey P. Katz and Chwen Sheu

The purpose of this study is to test the validity of national culture as an explanatory construct for international operations management decision‐making.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the validity of national culture as an explanatory construct for international operations management decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

National culture is multi‐dimensional thereby allowing for much finer grained comparisons than are possible when examining differences based purely on geography or the level of industrialization. This proposition is examined from the theoretical standpoint then empirically investigated using an existing database.

Findings

This article finds that national culture significantly explains international operations management behaviors among similar manufacturing plants in the same industry located in different cultures.

Originality/value

This study represents a first attempt at using national culture to explain differences of operations decision‐making.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2013

Rudolf R. Sinkovics and Olli Kuivalainen

The pervasiveness of the globalization phenomenon has triggered a significant number of studies related to the measurement of globalization and its implications for firms…

Abstract

The pervasiveness of the globalization phenomenon has triggered a significant number of studies related to the measurement of globalization and its implications for firms. Interestingly, most of the work is based on objective data, neglecting the importance of subjective and perceptual measures of degree of company globalization (DoCG). This study reviews the preliminary attempts to develop a subjective construct and a perceptual measurement tool for company globalization. Based on the work of Cavusgil, Yeniyurt, and Townsend (2004) a confirmatory factor analysis with partial least squares (PLS) path modeling illustrates relevant factors that capture the degree of globalization from a sample of multinationals. Post-hoc tests for the applicability of the generated framework are conducted to examine the consistency of results from the factor analysis. We also test the relationship between subjective and objective measures of company globalization. Although the small sample size does not allow the generalizability of the findings, this study contributes to the body of research aspiring to clarify the nature of a global company, offers a subjective measure for this phenomenon that can stimulate survey-based research with corporate elites, and thus provides a platform for further research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Satish Mehra and Surendra P. Agrawal

Total quality has been acclaimed as an organizational philosophy to enhance global competitiveness. However, changing paradigms in global business operations require that…

Abstract

Total quality has been acclaimed as an organizational philosophy to enhance global competitiveness. However, changing paradigms in global business operations require that quality concepts like TQM be revised to reflect the changing nature of global competitiveness. This paper, using the existing literature and interactions with the real world managers, presents a conceptual quality framework that can be deployed to enhance the competitiveness of businesses operating in global environments. Specifically, this paper details those quality elements that can affect quality improvement efforts through a variety of cultural differences that one may encounter while managing global operations. Also, proposed are managerial guidelines for implementing quality in the global arena.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 20 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Krisztina Demeter

The purpose of this paper is to shortly overview the research in international operations management (OM), to provide background to the papers published in this special section.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shortly overview the research in international operations management (OM), to provide background to the papers published in this special section.

Design/methodology/approach

As a literature review, the paper investigates the past, present, and future of international OM. It is not a systematic review; the paper just highlights the most important international operational management research networks, streams and concepts in the field.

Findings

The paper finds that there is a time lag in the field of international OM compared to other research areas within international business and management. It provides some ideas for the future to be researched.

Originality/value

The paper gives a focused review on international research networks which has not been done before. It also identifies two different streams of researches in international OM: the stream investigating OM differences among geographical areas, and the stream dealing with issues of international manufacturing networks.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Stewart Miller, Jayanth Jayaram and Kefeng Xu

The purpose of this paper is to examine predictors of obtaining global certification (ISO 9000) in an emerging market by focusing on ownership structure and total quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine predictors of obtaining global certification (ISO 9000) in an emerging market by focusing on ownership structure and total quality management (TQM) commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adapts the theory of planned behavior to explain organizations that obtain global certification in an emerging market (China). Using 269 service firms at different stages of ISO 9000 certification (a proxy for goal-directed behavior/excellence by organizations), the study examines the influence of ownership structures (a proxy for perceived behavioral control) and TQM commitment (a proxy for attitude toward a behavior), using a probit model.

Findings

The results showed that ownership structures that were state-owned enterprises, privately owned enterprises and township-village enterprises (TVEs) had a lower probability of obtaining global certification. However, TQM commitment moderates the relationship between ownership structure and obtaining ISO 9000 certification for POEs and TVEs. The study found stronger results for a subsample of organizations that intended to obtain ISO 9000 certification. Among organizations without ISO 9000 certification, we examined organizations that began the learning process for ISO 9000 and those that had not, and found differences based on competitive pressures, ownership structures, and the moderating effect of TQM commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may consider manufacturing organizations and other countries to further validate the findings of our study.

Practical implications

Creating strong TQM commitment can be an effective means for POEs and TVEs to obtain ISO 9000 certification.

Originality/value

This study is the first to adapt the theory of planned behavior for an organization-level analysis of ISO 9000 certification, especially in the service operations setting. The study found that TQM commitment selectively moderates ownership structures in explaining the probability that an organization obtained ISO 9000 certification.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Udechukwu Ojiako, Stuart Maguire and Shuting Guo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the key practical factors that confront global businesses as they attempt to improve all aspects of their operations including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the key practical factors that confront global businesses as they attempt to improve all aspects of their operations including emerging areas of the customer experience. The paper focuses on the way various organisational capabilities such as information systems/information technology have been adopted in order to provide an enhanced operational and strategic control over key areas of business.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a case‐based participation observation study which explores the global operations of a major restaurant brand. This approach enables it to explore several concepts which examine the behaviour of global operations at a time of major change.

Findings

The paper has focused on the application of change principles in the restaurant and hospitality industry and its importance for business performance and marketing strategy. The paper shows how adapting business strategy to incorporate key cultural sensitivities can pay major dividends for organisations. This strategy appears to be contrary to the general approach of standardisation adopted by other franchises in this key market sector.

Research limitations/implications

It will be necessary to increase the range of this research to ensure any real certainty regarding its implications.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a number of interesting changes to preconceived ideas of standardising product portfolios in the restaurant sector. It shows the need for a balanced “mix” of menu products to satisfy local and national requirements.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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