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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Charles O. Omekwu and Ifeoma R. Echezona

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges and opportunities for librarians operating in a global information environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges and opportunities for librarians operating in a global information environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory research design is adopted and secondary data are also used. The method is to first examine the concept of globalization, the status of information and communication technology (ICT) in African countries and current issues in library practices with specific focus on digital technology, and internet use pattern across Africa. The next approach is to examine the challenges and opportunities for libraries and librarians in a global information environment.

Findings

The paper concludes that the critical challenge for information professionals from developing countries is to harness technological systems to globalize their information resources and services. The opportunities of doing so are boundless, borderless and beneficial in accessing the global information pool.

Practical implications

Nigeria libraries are critically situated at the crossroads of digital revolution that is creating new vistas for information service provision. But how far and how fast they move from the crossroads to the emerging digital threshold will define their quality as well as quantity of information services provision by all species of libraries.

Originality/value

The paper originality lies in its concise articulation of the boundless opportunities in a duality of a global information environment and the argument that librarians, who will manage information in the globalized environment, must acquire skills that will make global professionals rather than local champions. It is further contended that Nigerian libraries must join the march of civilization and the radical impact of the globalization process. This is because of the fact that in the garden of humanity, nothing is static; that which fails to grow will begin the process of gradual extinction and irrelevance. This paper looks at the library in a global information environment. It also examines the impact of ICT on global information network. The opportunities offered by the impact of ICT on globalization are also discussed. It articulates the challenges for librarians and libraries in global information environment.

Details

Library Review, vol. 58 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2015

Denise Kwan and Libi Shen

The purpose of this case study was to explore senior librarians’ perceptions of successful leadership skills in the 21st century. The data gathered from 10 senior library

Abstract

The purpose of this case study was to explore senior librarians’ perceptions of successful leadership skills in the 21st century. The data gathered from 10 senior library leaders consisted of demographic information and responses to six open-ended interview questions. From the NVivo 10 analysis, several significant themes emerged regarding successful library leadership skills in the 21st century at two levels: foundational and interpersonal. At the foundational level, technical and knowledge skills form the building blocks for the next level of interpersonal skills. Persuasion and collaborative skills are interwoven with these interpersonal skills, both of which are at the core of the postindustrial paradigm of leadership. These two levels of skills, with an emphasis on persuasion skills, should form the basis of succession planning programs for next generation librarians. Implementing such programs could lead to increased leadership diversity, greater job satisfaction, improved job performance and effectiveness, all of which help retain librarians and ease staff shortages. Further studies are recommended.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-910-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Sarah Long

Sarah Long’s Sister Library Program began as an initiative of her American Library Association Presidency and continues as a project of the American Library Association’s…

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Abstract

Sarah Long’s Sister Library Program began as an initiative of her American Library Association Presidency and continues as a project of the American Library Association’s International Relations Round Table. This article describes components of the ALA Presidential project and activities of model Sister Library relationships. It summarizes the results of a program at the IFLA Conference in Jerusalem in August 2000 that presented perspectives from various programs for global library pairings and reviewed what has been learned over the past few years about global partnerships.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

David Streatfield, Richard Abisla, Umut Al, Violeta Bunescu, Yulianto Dewata, Camila Garroux, Daniela Greeb, Artiom Maister, Jeremy Paley, Shipra Sharma, Tripti Sharma, İrem Soydal and Tâm Thị Thanh Trần

The purpose of this paper is to report on recent performance measurement and impact evaluation progress made in Brazil, India, Indonesia, Moldova, Turkey and Vietnam as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on recent performance measurement and impact evaluation progress made in Brazil, India, Indonesia, Moldova, Turkey and Vietnam as part of the last phase of the Global Libraries Initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

The country reports are presented as a series of case studies, in some cases supplementing those reported earlier in this journal.

Findings

Recent country-specific survey findings are reported and some conclusions are offered.

Research limitations/implications

This paper demonstrates how the adoption of a common approach to library service evaluation across several countries can strengthen research practice at country level beyond the Global Libraries Initiative itself.

Practical implications

This paper shares Global Libraries IPA learning at country level with people in other countries who may be contemplating public library evaluation at regional, national or local levels or who are interested in performance measurement and impact evaluation.

Social implications

The paper shows how focusing on the impact of public library services on users can enhance the understanding of community requirements and inform the development of more effective services to library users and communities.

Originality/value

These case studies reflect concentrated impact evaluation and performance measurement work at country level across a range of countries over more than 18 years.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Janet Sawaya, Tshepo Maswabi, Resego Taolo, Pablo Andrade, Máximo Moreno Grez, Pilar Pacheco, Kristine Paberza, Sandra Vigante, Agniete Kurutyte, Ugne Rutkauskiene, Jolanta Jeżowska and Maciej Kochanowicz

This paper aims to draw together the evidence‐based advocacy experience of five national programs focused on developing public access information and communications…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw together the evidence‐based advocacy experience of five national programs focused on developing public access information and communications technologies (ICT) via public libraries as grantees of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Global Libraries Initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe a common approach to strategic advocacy and to impact planning and assessment. They then outline the experience of each program in using a range of evidence to help meet specific advocacy objectives. They give particular attention to how each program is using specific evidence to convince key players of the importance of public access ICT provided by public libraries in meeting the objectives of the key players.

Findings

This collective experience shows that when advocating at the national level, statistical data and empirical evidence can demonstrate that public libraries contribute to stakeholders' goals. Such data can include technology skills that users have gained as well as how users improve their businesses, become better educated, and access government services. Common denominators from the programs include a disproportionate positive impact achieved (or anticipated) in rural communities and on relatively disadvantaged groups such as older workers, old people and unemployed people.

Practical implications

Both the general approach to evidence‐based advocacy described and the specific messages about targeting advocacy efforts on key players and on the service users who are most likely to benefit from public access ICT are of potential value to anyone planning a national, regional or local advocacy program focused on public libraries and their services.

Social implications

As the paper deals with global library advocacy issues, and impact planning, it is hoped it is a step towards more measurable social impact for libraries.

Originality/value

This is the first full public report of the Global Libraries approach to evidence‐based advocacy as conducted in the five countries represented in the paper. It is part of a steadily growing body of knowledge being amassed by Global Libraries about effective provision of public access ICT via public libraries in a range of countries.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Deborah Jakubs

The AAU/ARL (Association of American Universities/Association of Research Libraries) Global Resources Program was launched early in 1997 by the Association of Research…

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394

Abstract

The AAU/ARL (Association of American Universities/Association of Research Libraries) Global Resources Program was launched early in 1997 by the Association of Research Libraries, with funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Reviews the development of the related projects that preceded the establishment of the AAU/ARL Global Resources Program, describing the context for its creation and the goals it aspires to fulfil, and identifies some of the challenges the Program faces on the path to full implementation. It is hoped that the AAU/ARL Global Resources Program will encourage us to develop true international collaboration, branching out from accomplishments thus far, as the Program itself built on the efforts that preceded it.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Marcel Chiranov

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings from the pilot stage evaluation of the Global Libraries – Biblionet Romania project. The project involves…

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1997

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings from the pilot stage evaluation of the Global Libraries – Biblionet Romania project. The project involves introducing public access ICT via public libraries in Romania and the pilot evaluation was designed to ensure the adoption of an appropriate impact planning and assessment program for the main project.

Design/methodology/approach

Since the start of the Global Libraries – Biblionet Romania project, planning and managing for results have been the guiding philosophy. The team was concerned to find the right balance between what is too much for librarians in terms of data collection, and what precisely to promote as useful metrics with which the librarians are comfortable and which do not create too much extra work. A step‐by‐step approach has been used to involve librarians in decisions, facilitate consensus, and double‐check agreements, understandings and results. This involved phases of engagement with users in the pilot project areas, librarians, and the national professional body.

Findings

The pilot has revealed some of the key characteristics of library patrons as public access ICT users, some of the major factors in implementing public access computing through libraries and important elements of the capacity for change in the national professional body, all of which will inform the design and planning of the main project.

Research limitations/implications

Librarians in the 12 pilot sites had different levels of expertise and interest in data collection and different levels of understanding of the relationship between impact assessment and service development. The paper expresses how one can quantify the benefits of using computer and internet in public libraries. Handled skilfully, this approach can be a strong advocacy tool to communicating with public authorities and other local or national stakeholders. Although this was a pilot project, it was substantial in scale and provides useful insights into all facets of a major implementation program as well as important assessment data on Romanian public libraries.

Originality/value

The pilot project has already provided original evidence of the significance and value of public libraries in Romania. (The main project that will be designed on the basis of this evidence will in due course add a major and continuing further dimension to this process of assessment.)

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Aubrey Harvey Chaputula

The aim of this paper is to determine the impact of the global economic crisis on University of Malawi Libraries and Mzuzu University Library.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the impact of the global economic crisis on University of Malawi Libraries and Mzuzu University Library.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was adopted, and data were collected using both interview guides and questionnaires.

Findings

Findings show that libraries in this study were not affected much by the global economic crisis. Budgets of the libraries had registered steady increments, and this had positively impacted on collection development activities, staff recruitment and training, infrastructure development, and internal and external travels etc. Effects of the economic crisis, though minor, were evident by the stagnation of some college budgets and absence of scholarships for training abroad.

Research limitations/implications

The study covered four of the five libraries in the University of Malawi namely the Polytechnic, College of Medicine, Bunda College, Kamuzu College of Nursing and Mzuzu University. Chancellor College Library did not participate because the researcher faced challenges in getting permission from authorities. So much as the results do give a general picture of libraries under the University of Malawi, the findings may not necessarily apply to Chancellor College Library.

Originality/value

In light of the findings, libraries were encouraged to strengthen existing income generating activities, and also explore other ways of generating revenue to cover for shortfalls in the budget that may be prompted by withdrawal of donor funds and cuts in government subvention should the global economic crisis persist.

Details

Library Management, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Modern Information Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-525-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

David P. Atkins

International interlibrary loan remains a persistent and sometimes vexing topic in US libraries. Technology's advance allows libraries and library users to easily identify…

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1578

Abstract

Purpose

International interlibrary loan remains a persistent and sometimes vexing topic in US libraries. Technology's advance allows libraries and library users to easily identify resources from across the globe. This ease of discovery belies the difficulty of delivery. To contribute to the conversation, the ALA RUSA STARS International Interlibrary Loan Committee conducted a survey of US libraries regarding international interlibrary loan activity. The survey uncovered elements impacting ILL success and failure and identified opportunities for US academic libraries global ILL participation. Issues that concern the survey's participants included communications, copyright, customs, payment methods, shipping, and language barriers. US interlibrary loan librarians seek cooperative responses to these problems. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the current climate of international interlibrary loan from a US perspective and highlights efforts to use STARS survey results to inform international ILL programs and best practices.

Findings

To expand international interlending, STARS can build on today's extra‐OCLC resource sharing strategies and leverage survey results to focus programming and promotional efforts. At the same time, librarians must improve communications and foster international resource sharing communities which contributes to the international dialog essential for interlending success.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new initiative from the major professional association for North American librarians dedicated to resource sharing.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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